Splendor in the Grass Reviews

  • Jul 20, 2019

    Wood's Best, Blobbo have big crush. (5 blobs up.)

    Wood's Best, Blobbo have big crush. (5 blobs up.)

  • May 04, 2019

    One of the greatest movies EVER, in my opinion. I saw it when I was a teenager pretty much like Deanie... so much love, so much incapacity of letting it be expressed out. I was around 22 then and SOBBED while watching it, felt compassion for everyone in that movie and also for myself, haha. Now I'm 37 and I watched again and LOVED IT STILL. Cried... all that (and also appreciated more how artistic movies were back then). Maybe it hit me so much because since I saw it so young and so in love, it feels like it is personally talking to me. Anyway, great history (maybe a little extreme), great actors and actresses, great escenografy, TOTAL QUALITY IN MY BOOK <3

    One of the greatest movies EVER, in my opinion. I saw it when I was a teenager pretty much like Deanie... so much love, so much incapacity of letting it be expressed out. I was around 22 then and SOBBED while watching it, felt compassion for everyone in that movie and also for myself, haha. Now I'm 37 and I watched again and LOVED IT STILL. Cried... all that (and also appreciated more how artistic movies were back then). Maybe it hit me so much because since I saw it so young and so in love, it feels like it is personally talking to me. Anyway, great history (maybe a little extreme), great actors and actresses, great escenografy, TOTAL QUALITY IN MY BOOK <3

  • Jun 29, 2018

    Strange but interesting.

    Strange but interesting.

  • Nov 26, 2017

    Taking a line as the title, Elia Kazan relates poignantly the quintessence of naïveté lost but enlightenment gained in William Wordsworth's Ode to Intimations of Immortality with a doomed romance starring Oscar-nominee Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty in his acting film debut.

    Taking a line as the title, Elia Kazan relates poignantly the quintessence of naïveté lost but enlightenment gained in William Wordsworth's Ode to Intimations of Immortality with a doomed romance starring Oscar-nominee Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty in his acting film debut.

  • Jul 21, 2017

    A decent psychological drama that takes too long to end, but Wood and Beatty are great throughout.

    A decent psychological drama that takes too long to end, but Wood and Beatty are great throughout.

  • Jun 10, 2017

    Splendor in the Grass is one phenomenal teen romantic drama which deals with its subject of sexual repression in a tragic and very dramatic manner. The performances are very good with Natalie Wood being fantastic, it has a wonderful ending and a couple of tragic scenes while being moving and relatable throughout its runtime. It is a movie that was very modern and sensual owing to its two very good looking actors and thematically bold for its time and it should be regarded better nowadays.

    Splendor in the Grass is one phenomenal teen romantic drama which deals with its subject of sexual repression in a tragic and very dramatic manner. The performances are very good with Natalie Wood being fantastic, it has a wonderful ending and a couple of tragic scenes while being moving and relatable throughout its runtime. It is a movie that was very modern and sensual owing to its two very good looking actors and thematically bold for its time and it should be regarded better nowadays.

  • Jun 25, 2016

    Thoughtful and emotionally moving. A very satisfying experience. A must-see flick. Powerful and shockingly revealing treatment of teen sexuality, repression, and especially mental illness. It even exposes the American Dream with its underside of false hopes, crushing expectations, and the weird demands overly ambiguous parents put on their children bc of societal norms. If you are willing to follow everything despite the Technicolor flourishes and the sometimes overwrought emotions, this is a surprisingly satisfying story. There is a thoughtful, naturalistic element to the acting here, and it speaks volumes to the craft of acting, and it rings true. 5 out of 5

    Thoughtful and emotionally moving. A very satisfying experience. A must-see flick. Powerful and shockingly revealing treatment of teen sexuality, repression, and especially mental illness. It even exposes the American Dream with its underside of false hopes, crushing expectations, and the weird demands overly ambiguous parents put on their children bc of societal norms. If you are willing to follow everything despite the Technicolor flourishes and the sometimes overwrought emotions, this is a surprisingly satisfying story. There is a thoughtful, naturalistic element to the acting here, and it speaks volumes to the craft of acting, and it rings true. 5 out of 5

  • Jun 09, 2016

    A real masterpiece by Kazan. Nuanced and intelligent performances by all of the actors, a perfect cast really. Wonderfully complex themes on love, growing up, letting go of childhood, waking up to the flaws of adults, reconciling your parents as fellow humans, and what I like to call the condition of being female in society. I'm sure in '61 all of the women in this movie were easy to dismiss as the stereotypes they all as characters play into, but in 2016 it's hard not to see all of them as layered, relatable and misunderstood. There's never a moment in which Kazan dismisses any of these women, they all have their moment of sympathy and empathy from the camera and the script. What a sad, beautiful film. Not to mention some really shocking scenes (especially for '61) that still make you gasp.

    A real masterpiece by Kazan. Nuanced and intelligent performances by all of the actors, a perfect cast really. Wonderfully complex themes on love, growing up, letting go of childhood, waking up to the flaws of adults, reconciling your parents as fellow humans, and what I like to call the condition of being female in society. I'm sure in '61 all of the women in this movie were easy to dismiss as the stereotypes they all as characters play into, but in 2016 it's hard not to see all of them as layered, relatable and misunderstood. There's never a moment in which Kazan dismisses any of these women, they all have their moment of sympathy and empathy from the camera and the script. What a sad, beautiful film. Not to mention some really shocking scenes (especially for '61) that still make you gasp.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    May 27, 2016

    Such a heartbreaking tale of teenage angst and tragic love. Natalie Wood is stunning and in a story with some real weight to it, performs brilliantly. The film 'introduces' Warren Beatty, who's no slouch himself, and finer looking couple I don't think you'll ever see. The film opens with the two of them making out heavily while parked by a waterfall (the crashing falls a little heavy in their symbolism), and her stopping him, much to his frustration. Once home, her mother cautions her about going too far, and then tells her that not only do good girls save themselves for marriage, but they don't have those urges at all(!) Meanwhile, he goes home to a father who tells him he'll have to marry her if he gets her pregnant, and then rams his vision for the boy's future down this throat, which is Yale followed by a job in his oil business, all without pausing to listen to him. Both go to bed understandably frustrated. Their parents have spoken to them out of love, but not in an open-minded way, and one that's hopelessly outdated. You really feel for Wood in this film. Her looks of love into Beatty's eyes are intensely endearing. Frustrated, he tests his power over her by pushing her to her knees and saying "at my feet, slave", and makes her tell him how much she loves him. She says she would do anything for him, and we believe it, but understand she won't do *that*. It drives Beatty crazy and he wants to marry her, but his father insists that he wait until after college, and encourages him to go after a "different kind of girl" to relieve his frustrations(!) The well-meaning but bad parenting abounds. Ultimately Beatty breaks it off with Wood despite their love for one another, and from there, her spiral begins. Wood has three fantastic scenes that earned her an Academy Award nomination. In the first, her teacher forces her to recite a poem from William Wordsworth; the words clearly relate to her heartbreak: "What though the radiance which was once so bright Be now for ever taken from my sight, Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower, We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind..." The second has her in the bathtub, where her mother's only concern is whether he "spoiled" her, and her emotional reaction, expressing her grief and frustration of it all, "spoiled?? I'm not spoiled, mom! I'm not spoiled, mom! I'm just as fresh and viriginal as the day I was born, mom!" her voice and emotion rising. We really feel the hypocrisy of the double standard - girls are either "bad" or "good" - and the horrible position this puts them in. In the third scene, Wood throws herself at Beatty, saying she's not a nice girl, and he resists, sensing her desperation and knowing they shouldn't do it in her state of mind. He asks her where's her pride, and she erupts, "My pride?! I haven't any pride! I just want to die!" Did I mention heartbreaking? They part, Beatty to a life of dissipation at Yale, Wood to a mental institution in Virginia. They never forget one another, but their time is past. The ending is brilliantly balanced. A couple of years later she sees him for closure; he's married with a child, and she's engaged. She asks him whether he's happy, and he replies, "I guess so. I don't ask myself that question much ... What's the point, ya gotta take what comes." So poignant. One thing I've always found a little odd is how Beatty's bohemian, somewhat wild sister, played very well by Barbara Loden, disappears after some great scenes, the last of which has her drinking too much out of frustration at a New Year's party, 1929. She underscores the double standard and the desire to freely pursue one's destiny, wanting to go to California and study art, and saying she's a "freak in this town". The other small knock I have is that while the film is set in 1928, aside from the old car and some elements of the set, it really feels like 1961, the year it was made, based on the appearances of the characters and the story itself. No matter, though. This is a timeless story of heartache and passion, and yet in the end, maturity in working through breaking up over a love that (unfairly) couldn't be. Kazan directs it well, bringing out great performances and emotion, without being overly melodramatic. He's also daring - what Beatty (and Wood) want is abundantly clear - while at the same time being honest, and real. Definitely recommended.

    Such a heartbreaking tale of teenage angst and tragic love. Natalie Wood is stunning and in a story with some real weight to it, performs brilliantly. The film 'introduces' Warren Beatty, who's no slouch himself, and finer looking couple I don't think you'll ever see. The film opens with the two of them making out heavily while parked by a waterfall (the crashing falls a little heavy in their symbolism), and her stopping him, much to his frustration. Once home, her mother cautions her about going too far, and then tells her that not only do good girls save themselves for marriage, but they don't have those urges at all(!) Meanwhile, he goes home to a father who tells him he'll have to marry her if he gets her pregnant, and then rams his vision for the boy's future down this throat, which is Yale followed by a job in his oil business, all without pausing to listen to him. Both go to bed understandably frustrated. Their parents have spoken to them out of love, but not in an open-minded way, and one that's hopelessly outdated. You really feel for Wood in this film. Her looks of love into Beatty's eyes are intensely endearing. Frustrated, he tests his power over her by pushing her to her knees and saying "at my feet, slave", and makes her tell him how much she loves him. She says she would do anything for him, and we believe it, but understand she won't do *that*. It drives Beatty crazy and he wants to marry her, but his father insists that he wait until after college, and encourages him to go after a "different kind of girl" to relieve his frustrations(!) The well-meaning but bad parenting abounds. Ultimately Beatty breaks it off with Wood despite their love for one another, and from there, her spiral begins. Wood has three fantastic scenes that earned her an Academy Award nomination. In the first, her teacher forces her to recite a poem from William Wordsworth; the words clearly relate to her heartbreak: "What though the radiance which was once so bright Be now for ever taken from my sight, Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower, We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind..." The second has her in the bathtub, where her mother's only concern is whether he "spoiled" her, and her emotional reaction, expressing her grief and frustration of it all, "spoiled?? I'm not spoiled, mom! I'm not spoiled, mom! I'm just as fresh and viriginal as the day I was born, mom!" her voice and emotion rising. We really feel the hypocrisy of the double standard - girls are either "bad" or "good" - and the horrible position this puts them in. In the third scene, Wood throws herself at Beatty, saying she's not a nice girl, and he resists, sensing her desperation and knowing they shouldn't do it in her state of mind. He asks her where's her pride, and she erupts, "My pride?! I haven't any pride! I just want to die!" Did I mention heartbreaking? They part, Beatty to a life of dissipation at Yale, Wood to a mental institution in Virginia. They never forget one another, but their time is past. The ending is brilliantly balanced. A couple of years later she sees him for closure; he's married with a child, and she's engaged. She asks him whether he's happy, and he replies, "I guess so. I don't ask myself that question much ... What's the point, ya gotta take what comes." So poignant. One thing I've always found a little odd is how Beatty's bohemian, somewhat wild sister, played very well by Barbara Loden, disappears after some great scenes, the last of which has her drinking too much out of frustration at a New Year's party, 1929. She underscores the double standard and the desire to freely pursue one's destiny, wanting to go to California and study art, and saying she's a "freak in this town". The other small knock I have is that while the film is set in 1928, aside from the old car and some elements of the set, it really feels like 1961, the year it was made, based on the appearances of the characters and the story itself. No matter, though. This is a timeless story of heartache and passion, and yet in the end, maturity in working through breaking up over a love that (unfairly) couldn't be. Kazan directs it well, bringing out great performances and emotion, without being overly melodramatic. He's also daring - what Beatty (and Wood) want is abundantly clear - while at the same time being honest, and real. Definitely recommended.

  • May 20, 2016

    I was skeptical at first but I found this to be a great film that battles a lot of today's issues with young love and the coping skills young teens lack. How young heartache can cause so many issues mentally. Not only in the category of love but in the loss of those we are close to in many ways, not just romantically. Natalie Woods gave a stellar performance! Warren Beatty was also great in his first film debut.

    I was skeptical at first but I found this to be a great film that battles a lot of today's issues with young love and the coping skills young teens lack. How young heartache can cause so many issues mentally. Not only in the category of love but in the loss of those we are close to in many ways, not just romantically. Natalie Woods gave a stellar performance! Warren Beatty was also great in his first film debut.