Zmruz oczy (Squint Your Eyes) Reviews

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    Mark A Super Reviewer
    Feb 07, 2011

    A nearly incomprehensible mish-mash that left this viewer scratching his head. There were some very cute scenes in here, and the humor was of the more subtle variety, but the story, the glue that would make it all hang together, was sorely lacking. One at times had the feeling that the subtitles were incomplete, or poorly translated to the point that it became difficult to understand what was happening and why. It is astounding to think that this film has won awards. The relationship between the caretaker, Jasiek (Zbigniew Zamachowski), and the young girl, Mala (Ola Proszynska), was touching but largely unexplained until well into the second reel. Several questions nag long after the movie ended. Why was the girl so disaffected with her parents? Where did she acquire an eagle, and where did it fly off to? Where did all of the various children come from, if this farm, or factory, or whatever it was, was so far out in the country? Was there some history between Jasiek and the mother? None of this was sufficiently explained for this viewer and distracted from being able to just enjoy what was presented.

    A nearly incomprehensible mish-mash that left this viewer scratching his head. There were some very cute scenes in here, and the humor was of the more subtle variety, but the story, the glue that would make it all hang together, was sorely lacking. One at times had the feeling that the subtitles were incomplete, or poorly translated to the point that it became difficult to understand what was happening and why. It is astounding to think that this film has won awards. The relationship between the caretaker, Jasiek (Zbigniew Zamachowski), and the young girl, Mala (Ola Proszynska), was touching but largely unexplained until well into the second reel. Several questions nag long after the movie ended. Why was the girl so disaffected with her parents? Where did she acquire an eagle, and where did it fly off to? Where did all of the various children come from, if this farm, or factory, or whatever it was, was so far out in the country? Was there some history between Jasiek and the mother? None of this was sufficiently explained for this viewer and distracted from being able to just enjoy what was presented.

  • Aug 09, 2010

    Director Andrzej Jakimowski applies the Polish post-communist trauma as backdrop for his excellent debut picture Zmruz Oczy, set in a Polish countryside not really in synch with the present, and where absurdly comical situations ensue as a result from it's encounters with new materialistic ways of life. There's also a less agreeable philosophical theme throughout the movie, which becomes tolerable through Zbigniew Zamachowski's natural and quietly funny rendition. Jakimowski apparently did some excellent writing for the movie, since both characters and complex backstory unfolds harmonically without the need for exposition. The cinematography is of superb quality with great wideangle shots of the landscape. Zmruz Oczy is a rare Polish treat, playing like a Kusturica-movie without ADHD-tendencies.

    Director Andrzej Jakimowski applies the Polish post-communist trauma as backdrop for his excellent debut picture Zmruz Oczy, set in a Polish countryside not really in synch with the present, and where absurdly comical situations ensue as a result from it's encounters with new materialistic ways of life. There's also a less agreeable philosophical theme throughout the movie, which becomes tolerable through Zbigniew Zamachowski's natural and quietly funny rendition. Jakimowski apparently did some excellent writing for the movie, since both characters and complex backstory unfolds harmonically without the need for exposition. The cinematography is of superb quality with great wideangle shots of the landscape. Zmruz Oczy is a rare Polish treat, playing like a Kusturica-movie without ADHD-tendencies.

  • Oct 26, 2008

    My favourite Polish film. Beautiful.

    My favourite Polish film. Beautiful.

  • Jul 02, 2006

    [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/movie/coverv/10/237110.jpg[/img]This Polish film from director Andrzej Jakimowski takes a look at the unique friendship between a younger girl and an older man. Mala runs away from home, fleeing the idyllic surroundings of her parent's farm, and instead shacks up with her former school teacher, Jaciek. With her parents and Jaciek both attempting to persuade Mala to return home, the story undergoes a few twists and turns, providing a fascinating meditation on the wiles of youth, and the adult reaction to them. Fairly interesting story that's very well acted. It's won numeruous film awards including SKYY prize at the San Fransisco Int'l Film Festival.

    [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/movie/coverv/10/237110.jpg[/img]This Polish film from director Andrzej Jakimowski takes a look at the unique friendship between a younger girl and an older man. Mala runs away from home, fleeing the idyllic surroundings of her parent's farm, and instead shacks up with her former school teacher, Jaciek. With her parents and Jaciek both attempting to persuade Mala to return home, the story undergoes a few twists and turns, providing a fascinating meditation on the wiles of youth, and the adult reaction to them. Fairly interesting story that's very well acted. It's won numeruous film awards including SKYY prize at the San Fransisco Int'l Film Festival.