Stacy Reviews

  • Mar 10, 2013

    The world population has dropped in half since all of the teenage girls between the ages of 15-17 have begun dying off and returning as zombie schoolgirls! As the Romero Repeat Kill Troops set out to destroy the threat, a crazed scientist works to unlock the secret that is causing this deadly phenomenon. Any subtext about teen fetishism and innocence lost that STACY might present is marred by this awful mess of a production. Though billed as a Horror Comedy, STACY is mostly unfunny, and it suffers from terrible acting, ugly cinematography, and a painfully slow pace. There are only a few distanced moments of bloody mayhem that are worth watching for, along with the typical fanboy references to THE EVIL DEAD and George Romero. Naoyuki Tomomatsu is simply unable to translate the intelligence of Kenji Otsuki's original novel in a meaningful way, leaving most zombie fans either confused or uninterested. The over-the-top gore and camp ridiculousness that does make it into STACY would lead the way for better films like THE MACHINE GIRL, TOKYO GORE POLICE, and ROBOGEISHA later in the decade. -Carl Manes I Like Horror Movies

    The world population has dropped in half since all of the teenage girls between the ages of 15-17 have begun dying off and returning as zombie schoolgirls! As the Romero Repeat Kill Troops set out to destroy the threat, a crazed scientist works to unlock the secret that is causing this deadly phenomenon. Any subtext about teen fetishism and innocence lost that STACY might present is marred by this awful mess of a production. Though billed as a Horror Comedy, STACY is mostly unfunny, and it suffers from terrible acting, ugly cinematography, and a painfully slow pace. There are only a few distanced moments of bloody mayhem that are worth watching for, along with the typical fanboy references to THE EVIL DEAD and George Romero. Naoyuki Tomomatsu is simply unable to translate the intelligence of Kenji Otsuki's original novel in a meaningful way, leaving most zombie fans either confused or uninterested. The over-the-top gore and camp ridiculousness that does make it into STACY would lead the way for better films like THE MACHINE GIRL, TOKYO GORE POLICE, and ROBOGEISHA later in the decade. -Carl Manes I Like Horror Movies

  • Aug 25, 2012

    What can there be said about a movie about Japanese Schoolgirl zombies that hasn't already been said before.

    What can there be said about a movie about Japanese Schoolgirl zombies that hasn't already been said before.

  • Jul 19, 2012

    STACY, ATTACK OF THE SCHOOLGIRL ZOMBIES en vf. Rien à sauver... Pà (C)nible, moche et d'un amateurisme effarant...

    STACY, ATTACK OF THE SCHOOLGIRL ZOMBIES en vf. Rien à sauver... Pà (C)nible, moche et d'un amateurisme effarant...

  • Jan 31, 2011

    I love the zombie genre, but even I have to admit that it's been done to death. Zombie flicks are cheap to make, so formulaic, mindless ones abound. When I find one that brings something new to the table, I'm happy to overlook a few flaws and find some delight in the undead novelty. Such is the case with "Stacy," a very unusual Japanese tale of the walking, flesh-munching dead in which the agent of reanimation is... well... love. A weird disease has gripped the world in the early 21st century. 15-17 year old girls are exhibiting manic "near death happiness," followed by the emergence of "butterfly twinkle powder" on their skin, after which they die and then proceed to chew up the living. The zombies are of the Romero type, lumbering and easily evaded alone, but devastating in numbers. In fact, this film makes no secret of its derivation from Romero's flicks, particularly "Day of the Dead." We get a military organization called the Romero Unit charged with zombie disposal, a mad scientist experimenting on the shambling ex-schoolgirls to learn the cause of the disease, and several scenes that are recreating almost exactly from Romero's work. The zombies themselves are fairly low-budget affairs with sometimes cheap-looking prosthetics, but the Japanese twists are apparent in the rolling eyes and lolling tongues that add some menace to the mix. There's no shortage of gore and plenty of uniquely Japanese black humor to be had. In fact, if you're not paying attention, you might think that Stacy is just another cheezball zombie-romp... and then you're missing out. The weird thing about "Stacy" is that it turns out to be a disturbingly touching horror movie. There are a few subplots at work here, but one of the most important involved a girl, Eiko, and a puppeteer, Shibukawa. Eiko is in the throes of NDH when Shibukawa meets her, walking around with a glass windchime and finding joy in everything to an extent that is calculatedly irritating. In the process, though, Shibukawa finds a kind of solace in her acceptance of her fate. Eiko has one foot among the living and one among the undead already, revealing to Shibukawa that those afflicted with the plague are looking for a strange kind of love and commitment. Unlike Romero's zombies, the only way to kill the Stacies (Stacy being a generic name for a schoolgirl zombie) is to cut them into 165 pieces. This can be facilitated with the use of Bruce Campbell's Right Hand 2.0, a sort of designer chainsaw we learn of in TV ads. The dying girls want this done by someone they love, not by the anonymous civil servants in the Romero Rekilling Unit. That's at the core of "Stacy," which evolves into a macabre exposition on the place of young Japanese women in their society, on love, commitment, and on accepting one's fate. Once the scientists figure this out, everyone accepts their fate, as shown in the most joyful death-by-zombies scenes I've ever seen in a horror flick. This sets up a particularly weird happy ending that, again, I've never seen before. None of this is take away from the gore factor or silly antics that also populate "Stacy." As I said, this is a very different sort of zombie flick. Flaws? Sure. The aforementioned low budget SFX make-up and straight-to-video look of the production, uneven acting (although Natsuki Katô is terrific as Eiko), perhaps one or two too many subplots, and occasional misses on pacing mean that this isn't a movie that's going to win any awards for top-tier film making. Nevertheless, if you're into zombie cinema and are feeling a little wearied by all of the forgettable knock-offs that have begun congealing into a featureless, bloody mess in your mind, "Stacy" is certainly worth a try. This one will stand out in your mind for a long, long time.

    I love the zombie genre, but even I have to admit that it's been done to death. Zombie flicks are cheap to make, so formulaic, mindless ones abound. When I find one that brings something new to the table, I'm happy to overlook a few flaws and find some delight in the undead novelty. Such is the case with "Stacy," a very unusual Japanese tale of the walking, flesh-munching dead in which the agent of reanimation is... well... love. A weird disease has gripped the world in the early 21st century. 15-17 year old girls are exhibiting manic "near death happiness," followed by the emergence of "butterfly twinkle powder" on their skin, after which they die and then proceed to chew up the living. The zombies are of the Romero type, lumbering and easily evaded alone, but devastating in numbers. In fact, this film makes no secret of its derivation from Romero's flicks, particularly "Day of the Dead." We get a military organization called the Romero Unit charged with zombie disposal, a mad scientist experimenting on the shambling ex-schoolgirls to learn the cause of the disease, and several scenes that are recreating almost exactly from Romero's work. The zombies themselves are fairly low-budget affairs with sometimes cheap-looking prosthetics, but the Japanese twists are apparent in the rolling eyes and lolling tongues that add some menace to the mix. There's no shortage of gore and plenty of uniquely Japanese black humor to be had. In fact, if you're not paying attention, you might think that Stacy is just another cheezball zombie-romp... and then you're missing out. The weird thing about "Stacy" is that it turns out to be a disturbingly touching horror movie. There are a few subplots at work here, but one of the most important involved a girl, Eiko, and a puppeteer, Shibukawa. Eiko is in the throes of NDH when Shibukawa meets her, walking around with a glass windchime and finding joy in everything to an extent that is calculatedly irritating. In the process, though, Shibukawa finds a kind of solace in her acceptance of her fate. Eiko has one foot among the living and one among the undead already, revealing to Shibukawa that those afflicted with the plague are looking for a strange kind of love and commitment. Unlike Romero's zombies, the only way to kill the Stacies (Stacy being a generic name for a schoolgirl zombie) is to cut them into 165 pieces. This can be facilitated with the use of Bruce Campbell's Right Hand 2.0, a sort of designer chainsaw we learn of in TV ads. The dying girls want this done by someone they love, not by the anonymous civil servants in the Romero Rekilling Unit. That's at the core of "Stacy," which evolves into a macabre exposition on the place of young Japanese women in their society, on love, commitment, and on accepting one's fate. Once the scientists figure this out, everyone accepts their fate, as shown in the most joyful death-by-zombies scenes I've ever seen in a horror flick. This sets up a particularly weird happy ending that, again, I've never seen before. None of this is take away from the gore factor or silly antics that also populate "Stacy." As I said, this is a very different sort of zombie flick. Flaws? Sure. The aforementioned low budget SFX make-up and straight-to-video look of the production, uneven acting (although Natsuki Katô is terrific as Eiko), perhaps one or two too many subplots, and occasional misses on pacing mean that this isn't a movie that's going to win any awards for top-tier film making. Nevertheless, if you're into zombie cinema and are feeling a little wearied by all of the forgettable knock-offs that have begun congealing into a featureless, bloody mess in your mind, "Stacy" is certainly worth a try. This one will stand out in your mind for a long, long time.

  • Oct 24, 2010

    Japoneses não sabem fazer filme de Zombies.

    Japoneses não sabem fazer filme de Zombies.

  • Oct 06, 2010

    i saw this movie last night at Ms. Mae's to an awesome coincidental soundtrack...but based on that it was awesome!

    i saw this movie last night at Ms. Mae's to an awesome coincidental soundtrack...but based on that it was awesome!

  • Jul 22, 2010

    Dingue, mais je n'en attendais pas moins de la part du réalisateur de "VG vs FG" et du "Eat the Schoolgirl" que j'ai vu très récemment. Le film nous montre un Japon en proie à un phénomène inhabituel, les adolescentes meurent et se réveillent en zombie ou plutôt en Stacy, car le nom du film vient de cette appellation donnée à toutes les jeunottes qui deviennent des morts vivants !! Pour rajouter à la mythologie, les filles connaissent un moment de grande euphorie avant de tomber définitivement, mais la nation a pris des mesures, une brigade spécialisée intervient de façon définitive dès qu'une Stacy apparaît !!! C'est un truc de dingue, ce film de 2001 (donc, avant la grande mode !) réussi à s'inventer son propre univers dans un genre ultra codé qu'est le film de zombie ! Evidemment, sur la forme c'est pas toujours maîtrisé mais la folie et la démesure propre au cinema de genre nippon fait une nouvelle fois ses preuves, même si on a déjà vu plus taré depuis ! "Stacy" est un film qui construit sa propre identité mais qui n'oublie pas ses références et les multiplient de façon très amusantes et astucieuse, la brigade tueuse de Stacy s'appelle Romero, et la population a aussi le choix de se défendre grâce à une tronçonneuse qui se porte à la main droite appelée "Blues Campbell" (quand on sait que les japonais prononcent des "R" comme des "L", c'est encore plus évident !). "Stacy" est une excellent alternative aux films de zombies qui semblent souvent se répéter et qui bénéficie du savoir faire japonais en matière de film qui délire dans la bonne humeur, une plutôt bonne surprise !!!

    Dingue, mais je n'en attendais pas moins de la part du réalisateur de "VG vs FG" et du "Eat the Schoolgirl" que j'ai vu très récemment. Le film nous montre un Japon en proie à un phénomène inhabituel, les adolescentes meurent et se réveillent en zombie ou plutôt en Stacy, car le nom du film vient de cette appellation donnée à toutes les jeunottes qui deviennent des morts vivants !! Pour rajouter à la mythologie, les filles connaissent un moment de grande euphorie avant de tomber définitivement, mais la nation a pris des mesures, une brigade spécialisée intervient de façon définitive dès qu'une Stacy apparaît !!! C'est un truc de dingue, ce film de 2001 (donc, avant la grande mode !) réussi à s'inventer son propre univers dans un genre ultra codé qu'est le film de zombie ! Evidemment, sur la forme c'est pas toujours maîtrisé mais la folie et la démesure propre au cinema de genre nippon fait une nouvelle fois ses preuves, même si on a déjà vu plus taré depuis ! "Stacy" est un film qui construit sa propre identité mais qui n'oublie pas ses références et les multiplient de façon très amusantes et astucieuse, la brigade tueuse de Stacy s'appelle Romero, et la population a aussi le choix de se défendre grâce à une tronçonneuse qui se porte à la main droite appelée "Blues Campbell" (quand on sait que les japonais prononcent des "R" comme des "L", c'est encore plus évident !). "Stacy" est une excellent alternative aux films de zombies qui semblent souvent se répéter et qui bénéficie du savoir faire japonais en matière de film qui délire dans la bonne humeur, une plutôt bonne surprise !!!

  • May 17, 2010

    a movie named after me... ok...no it wasnt...nevermind hot japanese girls in school uniforms, zombies, chainsaws, blood, guts, gore. YAY!!!! i didnt get to see the end because i have a problem staying awake during movies sometimes if i am really comfortable

    a movie named after me... ok...no it wasnt...nevermind hot japanese girls in school uniforms, zombies, chainsaws, blood, guts, gore. YAY!!!! i didnt get to see the end because i have a problem staying awake during movies sometimes if i am really comfortable

  • May 17, 2010

    [img]http://www.horrordvdtalk.com/reviews/Stacy/Stacy15.jpg[/img] I just don't see how a zombie fan would not like "Stacy." It's a satire zombie movie with a bunch of teenage girls and references to American zombie movies. This story itself makes little sense and the ending is just plain stupid, but that's all part of the fun. The movie is pretty short too, so it's not hard to sit through "Stacy." What strange is that this is the most beautifully shot Japanese film I've seen. I love that "Charlie's Angels" team. The Chun-Li one rules.

    [img]http://www.horrordvdtalk.com/reviews/Stacy/Stacy15.jpg[/img] I just don't see how a zombie fan would not like "Stacy." It's a satire zombie movie with a bunch of teenage girls and references to American zombie movies. This story itself makes little sense and the ending is just plain stupid, but that's all part of the fun. The movie is pretty short too, so it's not hard to sit through "Stacy." What strange is that this is the most beautifully shot Japanese film I've seen. I love that "Charlie's Angels" team. The Chun-Li one rules.

  • May 17, 2010

    [b][img]http://pygmalionproject.tripod.com/pics/diediedarling.jpg[/img] Die, Die My Darling[/b] (a.k.a. [b]Fanatic[/b]) is one of those non-Gothic films from Hammer studios. Influenced by [i]Psycho[/i] and [i]Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?[/i] (replace "Influenced by" with "Rips off" if you'd like) The cast is pretty good, with Tallulah Bankhead suitably creepy and Stephanie Powers suitably vulnerable. Powers is also easy on the eyes. Although I feel this could've used a boost up to be a classic, the indoor settings are nice, but often too brightly lit. Although (again) I'm a fan of 60s films that use colored lighting to good effect and this one has several scenes like that. There's also some touches of humor here and there thanks to Richard Matheson's script (which is based on a novel). Still, I can't help thinking this could've been a lot better with just a little extra effort. Anyway, I'll watch this again some time. Fairly enjoyed. ----------------------- [img]http://www2.english.uiuc.edu/cybercinema/images/bomb20_2.jpg[/img] [b]Dark Star[/b] was John Carpenter and Dan O' Bannon's student film that got bank rolled and a theatrical release. Judging by this DVD, they were happier with the original version and less satisfied when they had the money (about $60,000 more) to add new scenes. Usually I'll watch the longer one, but decided to take the shorter for a spin. I didn't like it as much. There's a bit I always look forward to (Pinback with the gag springy eyeglasses) but that was one of the added scenes. Still, this film is just full of great moments even in this shorter version. I guess all the best stuff is here. However, the longer one gets a 9/10 out of me. [b]Fun facts: [/b] 1. O' Bannon said he was tramatized by a visit to a theater where only 5 people showed up to see this on the day of release. Finally he did a film he called "a scary [b]Dark Star[/b]", that film was [i]Alien[/i]. 2. The TV show Red Dwarf was highly inspired by this film. In fact, the "talkie toaster" with AI from RD came directly from the talking bomb with AI in this film. ---------------------- [img]http://www.dvduncut.com/images/Stacy-deutsch.jpg[/img] [b]Stacy[/b] is just a Japanese [i]Return of the Living Dead[/i]. Lots of parody from many films in the genre, including the "Evil Deads" and Romeo's "deads". Even some shades of Peter Jackson's [i]Bad Taste[/i] and [i]Dead Alive[/i]. And throw in some small odd ideas that I don't remember seeing anywhere. Once it got started I actually had a good time watching it. Often a bit won't work too well (I didn't really laugh at the "Blues Campbell" chainsaws for some reason. Anybody else...?), but other times it gets some easy laughter. The effects are gooey, but the guts just made me hungry (well, they looked like link sausage in BBQ sauce...YUM!!). No quite as cheesy as the Chinese [i]Bio Zombie[/i], but nearly as much fun. ------------------------ [img]http://www.dvdloc8.com/images/dvdcover/5030.jpg[/img] Finally, [b]Psycho III[/b]. Really just a well made slasher film. It often loses it's way, but I think Perkins gave this some real style here and there from the genre. I quite like it and it made me grave even more horror slasher films. But I realise this isn't the greatest one in the series (or even second ;) ). The latest DVD release of this looks great! Maybe a little too good. The trailer on the DVD looks scratched and grainy but makes the film look much scarier. Hum, that's interesting...

    [b][img]http://pygmalionproject.tripod.com/pics/diediedarling.jpg[/img] Die, Die My Darling[/b] (a.k.a. [b]Fanatic[/b]) is one of those non-Gothic films from Hammer studios. Influenced by [i]Psycho[/i] and [i]Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?[/i] (replace "Influenced by" with "Rips off" if you'd like) The cast is pretty good, with Tallulah Bankhead suitably creepy and Stephanie Powers suitably vulnerable. Powers is also easy on the eyes. Although I feel this could've used a boost up to be a classic, the indoor settings are nice, but often too brightly lit. Although (again) I'm a fan of 60s films that use colored lighting to good effect and this one has several scenes like that. There's also some touches of humor here and there thanks to Richard Matheson's script (which is based on a novel). Still, I can't help thinking this could've been a lot better with just a little extra effort. Anyway, I'll watch this again some time. Fairly enjoyed. ----------------------- [img]http://www2.english.uiuc.edu/cybercinema/images/bomb20_2.jpg[/img] [b]Dark Star[/b] was John Carpenter and Dan O' Bannon's student film that got bank rolled and a theatrical release. Judging by this DVD, they were happier with the original version and less satisfied when they had the money (about $60,000 more) to add new scenes. Usually I'll watch the longer one, but decided to take the shorter for a spin. I didn't like it as much. There's a bit I always look forward to (Pinback with the gag springy eyeglasses) but that was one of the added scenes. Still, this film is just full of great moments even in this shorter version. I guess all the best stuff is here. However, the longer one gets a 9/10 out of me. [b]Fun facts: [/b] 1. O' Bannon said he was tramatized by a visit to a theater where only 5 people showed up to see this on the day of release. Finally he did a film he called "a scary [b]Dark Star[/b]", that film was [i]Alien[/i]. 2. The TV show Red Dwarf was highly inspired by this film. In fact, the "talkie toaster" with AI from RD came directly from the talking bomb with AI in this film. ---------------------- [img]http://www.dvduncut.com/images/Stacy-deutsch.jpg[/img] [b]Stacy[/b] is just a Japanese [i]Return of the Living Dead[/i]. Lots of parody from many films in the genre, including the "Evil Deads" and Romeo's "deads". Even some shades of Peter Jackson's [i]Bad Taste[/i] and [i]Dead Alive[/i]. And throw in some small odd ideas that I don't remember seeing anywhere. Once it got started I actually had a good time watching it. Often a bit won't work too well (I didn't really laugh at the "Blues Campbell" chainsaws for some reason. Anybody else...?), but other times it gets some easy laughter. The effects are gooey, but the guts just made me hungry (well, they looked like link sausage in BBQ sauce...YUM!!). No quite as cheesy as the Chinese [i]Bio Zombie[/i], but nearly as much fun. ------------------------ [img]http://www.dvdloc8.com/images/dvdcover/5030.jpg[/img] Finally, [b]Psycho III[/b]. Really just a well made slasher film. It often loses it's way, but I think Perkins gave this some real style here and there from the genre. I quite like it and it made me grave even more horror slasher films. But I realise this isn't the greatest one in the series (or even second ;) ). The latest DVD release of this looks great! Maybe a little too good. The trailer on the DVD looks scratched and grainy but makes the film look much scarier. Hum, that's interesting...