Star Trek: The Motion Picture Reviews

  • 3d ago

    Good idea, interesting characters but awful pacing

    Good idea, interesting characters but awful pacing

  • Aug 07, 2019

    Considering it was such a long wait for Trekkies to finally have a movie, I think all the criticism of this movie is rediculous. It was a great concept brought to us in a huge way on the big screen. Although, Spock's giant self was a bit odd, the rest of the movie plays out well. The movie's end pushed the boundaries of your imagination and gave it closure. I for won think it is a very good Star Trek Movie. Funny thing is, I do agree that the even numbered moves are better ha ha ha.

    Considering it was such a long wait for Trekkies to finally have a movie, I think all the criticism of this movie is rediculous. It was a great concept brought to us in a huge way on the big screen. Although, Spock's giant self was a bit odd, the rest of the movie plays out well. The movie's end pushed the boundaries of your imagination and gave it closure. I for won think it is a very good Star Trek Movie. Funny thing is, I do agree that the even numbered moves are better ha ha ha.

  • Aug 05, 2019

    (81/100) I was pleasantly surprised by Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The movie really plays like an ambiguous Spielberg or Kubrick movie about human conscience and consciousness, almost like Close Encounters of the Third Kind or 2001: A Space Odyssey. The middle of the movie can feel like it drags though, that's because the movie's biggest strength is also its' biggest weakness. The cloud that the Enterprise crew are approaching is faceless; without interest to the audience. But this ambiguity is what drives the last act of the movie and it really does deliver on its' premise. It presents a difference between human and machines like I haven't seen before in a movie. If this theme of the movie was tied even more to Spock, I believe the movie would have been recognised more as a philosophical journey through consciousness. The effects kind of hold up in present times, but it is very noticeable that this movie comes from 1979. The sets looked pretty cheap in some scenes, you could make out the cardboard. The acting was somewhat questionable in some scenes but not very distracting from the overall narrative. The score by Jerry Goldsmith is phenomenal and really nostalgic to listen to again. Overall, Star Trek: The Motion Picture is, in my humble opinion, a pretty good movie that presents some serious philosophical ideas and questions.

    (81/100) I was pleasantly surprised by Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The movie really plays like an ambiguous Spielberg or Kubrick movie about human conscience and consciousness, almost like Close Encounters of the Third Kind or 2001: A Space Odyssey. The middle of the movie can feel like it drags though, that's because the movie's biggest strength is also its' biggest weakness. The cloud that the Enterprise crew are approaching is faceless; without interest to the audience. But this ambiguity is what drives the last act of the movie and it really does deliver on its' premise. It presents a difference between human and machines like I haven't seen before in a movie. If this theme of the movie was tied even more to Spock, I believe the movie would have been recognised more as a philosophical journey through consciousness. The effects kind of hold up in present times, but it is very noticeable that this movie comes from 1979. The sets looked pretty cheap in some scenes, you could make out the cardboard. The acting was somewhat questionable in some scenes but not very distracting from the overall narrative. The score by Jerry Goldsmith is phenomenal and really nostalgic to listen to again. Overall, Star Trek: The Motion Picture is, in my humble opinion, a pretty good movie that presents some serious philosophical ideas and questions.

  • Jul 30, 2019

    Awesome special effects barely save this movie from it's dull and dialogue-heavy pace.

    Awesome special effects barely save this movie from it's dull and dialogue-heavy pace.

  • Jul 15, 2019

    Star Trek: The Motion Picture was great to look at. It had some humorous parts in it and dry wit. When it all comes at the end you're going to be twisted of 'what is this new dilemna' they are facing with. You're going to love it, or hate it. Many people don't like it, but I find it to be fascinating, disturbing, and it places us on a whole other level with the terms of science fiction can handle. I think this was like a long episode, but they didn't have the excitement of say, Star Wars at the time. All in all, it's still well made. Many overlook it. When you watch it, take your time. It's one of those movies. It's a recommended viewing. I give it a positive note.

    Star Trek: The Motion Picture was great to look at. It had some humorous parts in it and dry wit. When it all comes at the end you're going to be twisted of 'what is this new dilemna' they are facing with. You're going to love it, or hate it. Many people don't like it, but I find it to be fascinating, disturbing, and it places us on a whole other level with the terms of science fiction can handle. I think this was like a long episode, but they didn't have the excitement of say, Star Wars at the time. All in all, it's still well made. Many overlook it. When you watch it, take your time. It's one of those movies. It's a recommended viewing. I give it a positive note.

  • Jul 11, 2019

    Star Trek has never been as epic as this film is.

    Star Trek has never been as epic as this film is.

  • Jul 05, 2019

    It's good. The story isn't told that well and i'm not exactly a Star Trek expert do I don't know entirely what's going on but I can get a basic idea of it. Star Trek The Motion Picture is also really good visually so even if I can't entirely tell what's going on at least I like seeing the great visuals the movie has

    It's good. The story isn't told that well and i'm not exactly a Star Trek expert do I don't know entirely what's going on but I can get a basic idea of it. Star Trek The Motion Picture is also really good visually so even if I can't entirely tell what's going on at least I like seeing the great visuals the movie has

  • Jul 01, 2019

    I went to see this at the cinema in 1979 and was totally blown away with it. Great science fiction, super story, brilliant special effects. I've watched it at least once a year every since VHS videos then DVD came out. Coming up to 40 years old and this gem of a film still stands the test of time, even the effects still seem good. Its not for everyone, there is very little 'we come in peace shoot to kill' or 'Klingons on the starboard bow' but this film was an excellent link between the original 1960's TV series and the later film franchise.

    I went to see this at the cinema in 1979 and was totally blown away with it. Great science fiction, super story, brilliant special effects. I've watched it at least once a year every since VHS videos then DVD came out. Coming up to 40 years old and this gem of a film still stands the test of time, even the effects still seem good. Its not for everyone, there is very little 'we come in peace shoot to kill' or 'Klingons on the starboard bow' but this film was an excellent link between the original 1960's TV series and the later film franchise.

  • May 23, 2019

    Its been a bit of a Star Trek year for me all told, and whilst it has been centered around recent series, I have been reviewing both the theatrical and extended cut of the motion picture recently. I am surprised this film hits so low with the audience, even now, as it is a work of real imagination, even in a 'Post Star Wars World' A good example of this is the beauty of the Matt Jefferies designed TOS ship - and a comment I overheard regarding the motion picture, from 1979 recently: "The ship is beautiful, but that scene, flying over to the ship was far too long and boring". I take great exception to this, but can understand the sentiments of the speaker as they came to Trek as it was fully formed - long after even TNG - and did not see what some older fans had in the 70s. You have to remember that, by 1979 when the motion picture was released Trek had been 'away' from the screens for some time, save in re-run and the fans were becoming increasingly eager for something (Trek fans are something special). There was some real concern, once the film was announced that whilst the big screen, and the big budget would allow Gene to do things not even dreamed of, back in the early 60s it also raised the specter of change for change's sake, and the possible undermining of the core tenets of the show. In hindsight, these fears were groundless, as Gene and crew were as deeply in love with their show as they always had been. However, there were concerns and I think that some of the choices in the film were made to address the changes necessary and the old familiarities which were so important. They are legion, but can be best seen in the opening, and the attack on V'ger by the Klingon squadron. The radically altered Klingon characters (good move, BTW) against the basic similarity of their classic ships, hinted at what was to come when it came to the Enterprise herself. Here we are taking a trip with Kirk, back into memory, and ahead into potential. Just as he has been given his ship back, so too have we. Character and fans had been separated from the ship, from the adventure and from the hope for years and now, upon return we were all eager to see what time had wrought on those old memories. So, as we scoot along, in that travel pod, aware of Kirk's obvious affection for his Old Girl, we too are drawn into the refit as representing not only the development in film technology, but also our hopes for the future. Our first glimpse is that familiar fantail, and as Scotty's little side-long, amused glances hint at his own pride we are slowly, lovingly introduced to the old-new glory of the stars. We are reliving a dream, for the first time. We are coming upon a New World that we have known for many life-times. And, which is more, we were back in 1979 seeing this for the first time on the big screen - in a way that made it clear why the enterprise was such an important character (and one of the genius elements of the TMP, in that the V'ger constantly referred to Enterprise as an entity in her own right). Never before had we seen a ship this beautiful. Even in the post Star Wars World of junk-cool SF, there has not been a ship to equal the sheer beauty of the NCC-1701 (TOS or TMP) - and I will take the Pepsi challenge on that, any time, against any ship. This scene was for the fans then. Drawn out, loving and emotional. This was the scene that gave us back Star Trek properly."

    Its been a bit of a Star Trek year for me all told, and whilst it has been centered around recent series, I have been reviewing both the theatrical and extended cut of the motion picture recently. I am surprised this film hits so low with the audience, even now, as it is a work of real imagination, even in a 'Post Star Wars World' A good example of this is the beauty of the Matt Jefferies designed TOS ship - and a comment I overheard regarding the motion picture, from 1979 recently: "The ship is beautiful, but that scene, flying over to the ship was far too long and boring". I take great exception to this, but can understand the sentiments of the speaker as they came to Trek as it was fully formed - long after even TNG - and did not see what some older fans had in the 70s. You have to remember that, by 1979 when the motion picture was released Trek had been 'away' from the screens for some time, save in re-run and the fans were becoming increasingly eager for something (Trek fans are something special). There was some real concern, once the film was announced that whilst the big screen, and the big budget would allow Gene to do things not even dreamed of, back in the early 60s it also raised the specter of change for change's sake, and the possible undermining of the core tenets of the show. In hindsight, these fears were groundless, as Gene and crew were as deeply in love with their show as they always had been. However, there were concerns and I think that some of the choices in the film were made to address the changes necessary and the old familiarities which were so important. They are legion, but can be best seen in the opening, and the attack on V'ger by the Klingon squadron. The radically altered Klingon characters (good move, BTW) against the basic similarity of their classic ships, hinted at what was to come when it came to the Enterprise herself. Here we are taking a trip with Kirk, back into memory, and ahead into potential. Just as he has been given his ship back, so too have we. Character and fans had been separated from the ship, from the adventure and from the hope for years and now, upon return we were all eager to see what time had wrought on those old memories. So, as we scoot along, in that travel pod, aware of Kirk's obvious affection for his Old Girl, we too are drawn into the refit as representing not only the development in film technology, but also our hopes for the future. Our first glimpse is that familiar fantail, and as Scotty's little side-long, amused glances hint at his own pride we are slowly, lovingly introduced to the old-new glory of the stars. We are reliving a dream, for the first time. We are coming upon a New World that we have known for many life-times. And, which is more, we were back in 1979 seeing this for the first time on the big screen - in a way that made it clear why the enterprise was such an important character (and one of the genius elements of the TMP, in that the V'ger constantly referred to Enterprise as an entity in her own right). Never before had we seen a ship this beautiful. Even in the post Star Wars World of junk-cool SF, there has not been a ship to equal the sheer beauty of the NCC-1701 (TOS or TMP) - and I will take the Pepsi challenge on that, any time, against any ship. This scene was for the fans then. Drawn out, loving and emotional. This was the scene that gave us back Star Trek properly."

  • Apr 28, 2019

    The best movie character ever portrayed: William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk! With the best movie score ever composed!

    The best movie character ever portrayed: William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk! With the best movie score ever composed!