La sindrome di Stendhal (The Stendhal Syndrome) Reviews

  • Feb 17, 2019

    Dario Argento's aesthetics resides within a psychological thriller that, despite not ranking amongst the writer-director's best works, certainly has some influence over its most ardent fans.

    Dario Argento's aesthetics resides within a psychological thriller that, despite not ranking amongst the writer-director's best works, certainly has some influence over its most ardent fans.

  • Feb 13, 2017

    There is a very cool concept here, but the story is handled a little typically and you see the end coming a mile away. It doesn't help that the effects are horribly dated and that it drags quite a bit... Still though, it's Argento, so it still looks pretty, has a great score and is fairly entertaining.

    There is a very cool concept here, but the story is handled a little typically and you see the end coming a mile away. It doesn't help that the effects are horribly dated and that it drags quite a bit... Still though, it's Argento, so it still looks pretty, has a great score and is fairly entertaining.

  • Jul 15, 2016

    Some interesting ideas, but too much of this movie revolves around graphic, disturbing rapes to be more than 1 star.

    Some interesting ideas, but too much of this movie revolves around graphic, disturbing rapes to be more than 1 star.

  • Jun 13, 2016

    Really packs a punch.

    Really packs a punch.

  • Apr 27, 2016

    A police detective on the hunt for a serial rapist suffers from the hallucinations brought on by the titular Syndrome and suffers at the villains hands. Argento directs his daughter Asia in this one, so I would imagine that might be slightly awkward to tell your antagonist how you want him to sexually assault your own flesh and blood for the camera, but maybe that's just me projecting. Maybe they're all professionals and none of that ever enters the equation. Rental.

    A police detective on the hunt for a serial rapist suffers from the hallucinations brought on by the titular Syndrome and suffers at the villains hands. Argento directs his daughter Asia in this one, so I would imagine that might be slightly awkward to tell your antagonist how you want him to sexually assault your own flesh and blood for the camera, but maybe that's just me projecting. Maybe they're all professionals and none of that ever enters the equation. Rental.

  • Apr 14, 2016

    one of Argento's better efforts

    one of Argento's better efforts

  • Feb 22, 2016

    Although we're far from Argento's best, it's an enjoyable thriller with some nice plot twists, an original idea and some beautiful cinematic moments.

    Although we're far from Argento's best, it's an enjoyable thriller with some nice plot twists, an original idea and some beautiful cinematic moments.

  • Feb 06, 2015

    Written and directed by Dario Argento, adapted from the novel by Graziella Magherini, Argento was inspired to adapt Magherini's novel after it reminded him of an experience as a child which was similar to what the novel touched upon. It's a pretty nasty and dark film, even by Argento's standards, but it does have a lot going for it, and it has a very artistic and lavish flair about it. In Florence, Police Detective Anna Manni (Asia Argento) is on the hunt of a serial killer called serial killer Alfredo (Thomas Kretschmann). While at a museum, she becomes struck by Stendhal Syndrome, which causes people to become overwhelmed by great works of art. Alfredo notices Anna struck in the trance, and he uses this as an opportunity to kidnap and rape her. While she escapes and Alfredo is missing, presumed dead. Anna suffers a deep psychological trauma, but with help from lesbian lover and French student Marie (Julien Lambroschini) and psychiatrist Dr. Cavanna (Paolo Bonacelli), they try to help Anna overcome Stendhal Syndrome. It's got all the hallmarks we've come to expect from Argento, but most of it has all been seen before. However, it's fortunate to be blessed with beautiful cinematography by Giuseppe Rotunno and a sweeping score by Ennio Morricone, but it's a shame Argento hasn't been able to live up to his past glories.

    Written and directed by Dario Argento, adapted from the novel by Graziella Magherini, Argento was inspired to adapt Magherini's novel after it reminded him of an experience as a child which was similar to what the novel touched upon. It's a pretty nasty and dark film, even by Argento's standards, but it does have a lot going for it, and it has a very artistic and lavish flair about it. In Florence, Police Detective Anna Manni (Asia Argento) is on the hunt of a serial killer called serial killer Alfredo (Thomas Kretschmann). While at a museum, she becomes struck by Stendhal Syndrome, which causes people to become overwhelmed by great works of art. Alfredo notices Anna struck in the trance, and he uses this as an opportunity to kidnap and rape her. While she escapes and Alfredo is missing, presumed dead. Anna suffers a deep psychological trauma, but with help from lesbian lover and French student Marie (Julien Lambroschini) and psychiatrist Dr. Cavanna (Paolo Bonacelli), they try to help Anna overcome Stendhal Syndrome. It's got all the hallmarks we've come to expect from Argento, but most of it has all been seen before. However, it's fortunate to be blessed with beautiful cinematography by Giuseppe Rotunno and a sweeping score by Ennio Morricone, but it's a shame Argento hasn't been able to live up to his past glories.

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    Sylvester K Super Reviewer
    Nov 04, 2014

    Argento has always had interesting premises for his films but this is one of my least favourite of all Argento films (along with Giallo), largely due to the fact that it can barely be described as a giallo in itself. So the story was inspired by Stendhal syndrome where lightheadedness can be experienced by the sufferer when viewing great art works. Argento combined it with psychological thriller which explored the psychological consequences of rape victims. The film was thin on story and lacked of shocking gruesome deaths. It still maintained the stylish direction of Argento but I found his incorporation with CGI made the film rather flimsy. It is visually stunning at times, but the screenplay needed much improvement.

    Argento has always had interesting premises for his films but this is one of my least favourite of all Argento films (along with Giallo), largely due to the fact that it can barely be described as a giallo in itself. So the story was inspired by Stendhal syndrome where lightheadedness can be experienced by the sufferer when viewing great art works. Argento combined it with psychological thriller which explored the psychological consequences of rape victims. The film was thin on story and lacked of shocking gruesome deaths. It still maintained the stylish direction of Argento but I found his incorporation with CGI made the film rather flimsy. It is visually stunning at times, but the screenplay needed much improvement.

  • Nov 08, 2013

    Argento's Stendahl Syndrome Is A Weird, Strange & Suspensful, Mystery, Thriller. This Film See's A Female Cop, While Tracking Down A Rapist/Murderer Becomes The Target Of His Obsession. The Film Is Excellently Well Made And A Strong Cast, (With His Daughter Asia, In The Lead Role), A Good Plot & The Excellent Suspenseful Atmosphere Makes This An Extremely Entertaining Film.

    Argento's Stendahl Syndrome Is A Weird, Strange & Suspensful, Mystery, Thriller. This Film See's A Female Cop, While Tracking Down A Rapist/Murderer Becomes The Target Of His Obsession. The Film Is Excellently Well Made And A Strong Cast, (With His Daughter Asia, In The Lead Role), A Good Plot & The Excellent Suspenseful Atmosphere Makes This An Extremely Entertaining Film.