Stereo Reviews

  • Sep 23, 2018

    Was half asleep during the movie, so I didn't watch quite a few key scenes and was generally confused about the plot.

    Was half asleep during the movie, so I didn't watch quite a few key scenes and was generally confused about the plot.

  • Aug 02, 2016

    Gut! Atmosphärisch dicht und durchgehend gut gespielt!

    Gut! Atmosphärisch dicht und durchgehend gut gespielt!

  • Nov 22, 2014

    In an idyllic stretch of German countryside, Erek, a tattooed biker is pulled over by a cop. Unexpectedly, Erek (Jürgen Vogel) presents no hostility, simply stating that he is on his way to his girlfriend's house where he is late for dinner; in fact, despite his appearance, Erek is living a quiet law-abiding life, working as a mechanic in a small town far away from the city of Berlin where he once lived. Yet, appearances can of course be deceiving and there is more to Erik than meets the eye. Erik's true character begins to be revealed when his shady past begins to catch up with him in the guise of a hallucinatory character named Henry (Moritz Bleibtreu), who only appears to Erik and can't be seen or heard by anyone else. Whilst initially treated as a psychological issue - caused either by too little sleep or a more serious deterioration of his mental state - Erik begins to come to terms with this new individual in his life, who, despite his crass behaviour, presents the best chance for survival when a notorious gangster named Keitel also enters into the picture, demanding revenge for Erik's past actions. What follows is an adrenaline ride of excessive criminality and psychological thrills, caught somewhere between Fight Club and Only God Forgives. At times Stereo borders on the trashy, exploitation style of cinema and its twist is both predictable and not wholly original (in fact, the film's poster practically gives it away). Also evident is the extent to which Stereo borrows from other films - Die Hard, Old Boy, even the opening credits mirror those of the Bond franchise - although these moments do feel more like loving homages included by a director with a love for the genre rather than examples of outright thievery. Its polished camera work, stylistic flourishes and confident execution of its tried and tested plot make it an entertaining watch, and most of its flaws are easily forgiven, given the film's clear sentiment that it's not taking itself too seriously, as any genre film of its type should do. notesfromthemultiplex.com

    In an idyllic stretch of German countryside, Erek, a tattooed biker is pulled over by a cop. Unexpectedly, Erek (Jürgen Vogel) presents no hostility, simply stating that he is on his way to his girlfriend's house where he is late for dinner; in fact, despite his appearance, Erek is living a quiet law-abiding life, working as a mechanic in a small town far away from the city of Berlin where he once lived. Yet, appearances can of course be deceiving and there is more to Erik than meets the eye. Erik's true character begins to be revealed when his shady past begins to catch up with him in the guise of a hallucinatory character named Henry (Moritz Bleibtreu), who only appears to Erik and can't be seen or heard by anyone else. Whilst initially treated as a psychological issue - caused either by too little sleep or a more serious deterioration of his mental state - Erik begins to come to terms with this new individual in his life, who, despite his crass behaviour, presents the best chance for survival when a notorious gangster named Keitel also enters into the picture, demanding revenge for Erik's past actions. What follows is an adrenaline ride of excessive criminality and psychological thrills, caught somewhere between Fight Club and Only God Forgives. At times Stereo borders on the trashy, exploitation style of cinema and its twist is both predictable and not wholly original (in fact, the film's poster practically gives it away). Also evident is the extent to which Stereo borrows from other films - Die Hard, Old Boy, even the opening credits mirror those of the Bond franchise - although these moments do feel more like loving homages included by a director with a love for the genre rather than examples of outright thievery. Its polished camera work, stylistic flourishes and confident execution of its tried and tested plot make it an entertaining watch, and most of its flaws are easily forgiven, given the film's clear sentiment that it's not taking itself too seriously, as any genre film of its type should do. notesfromthemultiplex.com

  • Sep 03, 2014

    Enjoyable thriller with a few expected turns, but the performances made me not care about that.

    Enjoyable thriller with a few expected turns, but the performances made me not care about that.

  • May 21, 2014

    Suspenseful, well-done Thriller that'll keep you on the edge of your seat!

    Suspenseful, well-done Thriller that'll keep you on the edge of your seat!

  • May 21, 2014

    Suspenseful Thriller!

    Suspenseful Thriller!