Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine Reviews

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September 9, 2015
Steve Jobs: The Man In The Machine is a conversation starter loaded with controversial data about the lesser-known life of genius/tyrant Steve Jobs, but it asks a simple question of "why" that it can't even answer itself.
September 8, 2015
For those who don't yet know of Jobs' dark side, Gibney's documentary will be a useful eye-opener, but those looking to understand what made Jobs great in almost equal proportion to his nastiness will remain in the dark.
September 5, 2015
If you're expecting solid answers, you'll be severely disappointed. Ditto, if you come expecting a hagiography. In fact, I'm betting worshipers at the church of Jobs will be livid.
September 5, 2015
The more interesting question [Gibney poses, and poses well, is why we need to create a hero of someone who no doubt changed the world, but who was more iconoclast that saint.
September 5, 2015
Slick and mildly provocative, but overlong with excessive expository information. Steve Jobs makes for a very captivating subject.
September 4, 2015
The movie comes off as less a portrait of a complicated man than a pendulum swing from deity to devil.
September 4, 2015
Much of the film is devoted to debunking Apple's image.
September 4, 2015
Little here is new, but the archival footage is well chosen, the interviewees are illuminating, and Gibney, as usual, potently synthesizes what's out there.
September 4, 2015
There is practically nothing in this film that was not already raked over in Walter Isaacson's 2013 biography or in the many thousands of articles about Jobs over the years. But there is something about seeing and hearing this story onscreen.
September 4, 2015
Sure, Jobs was a genius and a jerk, but Gibney spends so much time rambling and musing that we don't get a chance to understand why so many people only wanted to hear the "genius" part.
September 4, 2015
The documentary feels like a puzzle whose pieces were forced together by a toddler.
September 4, 2015
Gibney stylistically draws on prolific experience profiling narcissistic control freaks obsessed with marketing themselves. . .a more philosophical than investigative search.
September 4, 2015
"Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine" is still wholly engrossing, especially in its first half, when it tells its thrilling creation stories.
September 4, 2015
The Steve Jobs that emerges in Gibney's portrait is a guy whose worldly successes and grand public gestures are balanced by a cold-hearted ruthlessness and amazing disregard for normal human decency.
September 4, 2015
Fascinating warts and all Jobs doc from the prolific Alex Gibney.
September 4, 2015
Gibney's inspiration was the outpouring of public grief for Jobs upon his death in 2011, a phenomenon that clearly got his dander up and which prompts him to begin this work with a simple question, 'Why?' That question is never answered...
September 4, 2015
A complex portrait that gives as much weight to Jobs' world-changing talents as to his personal flaws.
September 3, 2015
Brings home the complexities and contradictions of the man.
September 3, 2015
Sometimes "Man in the Machine" feels like it needs a balancing voice. But it's nonetheless a fascinating film, as Gibney's always are.
September 3, 2015
Mr. Gibney, a prolific documentarian, not only charts Mr. Jobs's extraordinary record of marketing and innovation, but also presents a merciless anatomy of a complicated public character.
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