Stones In The Sun (2014)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Stones In The Sun Photos

Movie Info

In this powerful social drama, Haitian refugees cross paths in 1980s NYC as political violence engulfs their homeland. In order to move forward, they must confront the horrors of the past.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
Runtime:
Studio:

Cast

Michele Marcelin
as Micheline
James Noel
as Ronald
Diana Masi
as Rebecca
Carl Low
as Cop
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Stones In The Sun

All Critics (4) | Top Critics (2)

"Stones in the Sun" is a wrenching portrait of Haitian exiles struggling to build new lives in New York City after fleeing their country in the late 1980s.

Full Review… | November 20, 2014
New York Times
Top Critic

Good intentions can be deadly: Benoit runs into the common tripwire of caring more about pitching her cause than she does about movies.

Full Review… | November 18, 2014
Village Voice
Top Critic

A genuinely heartfelt portrait of Haitian life in 1980s Brooklyn brimming with humanism and emotionally resonant performances.

Full Review… | November 23, 2014
NYC Movie Guru

Taking no sides and every side, Stones in the Sun is a powerful tripartite narrative from Haitian filmmaker Patricia Benoit, using her own family history.

Full Review… | November 20, 2014
Film Journal International

Audience Reviews for Stones In The Sun

½

STONES IN THE SUN directed by Haitian filmmaker Patricia Benoit focusing on the struggling lives of Haitian immigrants in Brooklyn, NY who had fled the torture and repressive reigns of Papa Doc Duvalier and Baby Doc Duvalier, his generals and the Tontons Macoutes/death squads in the 1980's. "Duvalier authorized the Tontons Macoutes to commit systematic violence and human rights abuses to suppress political opposition. They were responsible for unknown numbers of murders and rapes in Haiti. He included among his opponents those who proposed progressive social systems. Political opponents often disappeared overnight, or were sometimes attacked in broad daylight. Tontons Macoutes stoned and burned people alive. Many times they put the corpses of their victims on display, often hung in trees for everyone to see and take as warnings against opposition..." (Wikipedia.) STONES IN THE SUN makes clear that we can leave our land but the land remains steadfast in our hearts; memories are seared into the ex-patriates' consciousness; the scars and beauty of the homeland weaves them to their past forever. Benoit concentrates on 3 families to give a fuller dimension to the diaspora. I was particularly moved by a married couple, achingly played by Patricia Rhinvil as the wife Vita and her husband Ronald (James Noel,) a cabdriver who was forced to flee for demonstrating in Haiti, leaving his wife behind at the mercy of men in the dark who commit bestiality upon women's flesh. The history of sexual brutality is wreaked upon Vita's slight frame. She arrives at the Airport, shyly observing her husband with sideways looks - fear, love and apprehension flicker across her face; beautifully acted; words are superfluous. Glimpses of a more care-free time are cut into the frames - what might have been - and what was, and what is. Haitian proverb: "Stones in the water don't know the suffering of stones in the sun."

Grace Pillard
Grace Pillard

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