Straight Up Reviews

  • Nov 27, 2020

    A very Millenial movie with charming performances

    A very Millenial movie with charming performances

  • Nov 12, 2020

    Katie Findlay is wonderful in 'Straight Up', written, directed, and starring James Sweeney. The acting here is much better than the second and third act story which end up fizzling out. I had a smile on my face for about half of the flick and then the tone changes and the end result didn't work for me. Hope it does for you! Final Score: 5.2/10

    Katie Findlay is wonderful in 'Straight Up', written, directed, and starring James Sweeney. The acting here is much better than the second and third act story which end up fizzling out. I had a smile on my face for about half of the flick and then the tone changes and the end result didn't work for me. Hope it does for you! Final Score: 5.2/10

  • Oct 14, 2020

    Crisis in sexual identity. So this is about a pair of intellectual soul mates, Todd and Rory (James Sweeney, Katie Findlay). He may or may not be gay, but he's young and figuring it all out. Is their companionship enough to keep a relationship going? Now I knew next to nothing about this; I just caught a glimpse of it while scrolling, which is more often than not the impetus for me taking chances on movies nowadays. The trailer seemed both snappy and witty enough for something to be there. I do like the points that this movie had to make, but I feel like this movie could have used some more time in the oven before releasing the end product. To start this off on a positive, I think that the biggest strength of Straight Up is the performance of the two leads. Sweeney acts, writes, and directs, so it makes sense that he gives the character of Todd the most engaging commentary to make. I do think that Findlay keeps up with him, and she is the reason why these two have good friendship chemistry. These are characters that can be difficult people, but you always understand their motivations. The dialogue that they share is entertaining, but I do have to say that it frequently feels unnatural. Even only ten minutes in, this was reminding me of the breakneck speed of something like His Girl Friday, or if you were looking for a reference this century, The Gilmore Girls. I know that show has its following, but I never cared for it because the banter ping pongs so quickly that characters are seldom allowed to react naturally. Rory gets introduced as all of this was going through my mind, and you can probably guess that this is where the Gilmores get a shoutout by name, so it is 100% confirmed that it was an influence. When this movie is just Todd and Rory, I mostly like it. They're in denial and lying to themselves, but that makes for an interesting dynamic. However, I found almost every side character in this to be insufferable. The friends in this are truly awful people, and I could maybe get past it if they were toned down, but they do nothing but antagonize and cause conflict to the point that there should be way more fighting in this. Todd and Rory are not a passive couple; they are people who will call you out on your BS, so when the story reaches this egregious and socially aggressive game night, their reactions feel inauthentic. I like the core voice here, I believe that Sweeney just needs to hone his craft, and given his age, he has the time to do that.

    Crisis in sexual identity. So this is about a pair of intellectual soul mates, Todd and Rory (James Sweeney, Katie Findlay). He may or may not be gay, but he's young and figuring it all out. Is their companionship enough to keep a relationship going? Now I knew next to nothing about this; I just caught a glimpse of it while scrolling, which is more often than not the impetus for me taking chances on movies nowadays. The trailer seemed both snappy and witty enough for something to be there. I do like the points that this movie had to make, but I feel like this movie could have used some more time in the oven before releasing the end product. To start this off on a positive, I think that the biggest strength of Straight Up is the performance of the two leads. Sweeney acts, writes, and directs, so it makes sense that he gives the character of Todd the most engaging commentary to make. I do think that Findlay keeps up with him, and she is the reason why these two have good friendship chemistry. These are characters that can be difficult people, but you always understand their motivations. The dialogue that they share is entertaining, but I do have to say that it frequently feels unnatural. Even only ten minutes in, this was reminding me of the breakneck speed of something like His Girl Friday, or if you were looking for a reference this century, The Gilmore Girls. I know that show has its following, but I never cared for it because the banter ping pongs so quickly that characters are seldom allowed to react naturally. Rory gets introduced as all of this was going through my mind, and you can probably guess that this is where the Gilmores get a shoutout by name, so it is 100% confirmed that it was an influence. When this movie is just Todd and Rory, I mostly like it. They're in denial and lying to themselves, but that makes for an interesting dynamic. However, I found almost every side character in this to be insufferable. The friends in this are truly awful people, and I could maybe get past it if they were toned down, but they do nothing but antagonize and cause conflict to the point that there should be way more fighting in this. Todd and Rory are not a passive couple; they are people who will call you out on your BS, so when the story reaches this egregious and socially aggressive game night, their reactions feel inauthentic. I like the core voice here, I believe that Sweeney just needs to hone his craft, and given his age, he has the time to do that.

  • Sep 09, 2020

    Hey look, I'm 100% gay gay gay and I liked it. One of the audience reviewers lambasted it saying, 'boo it was a sad ending'. Hello? (slight spoiler alert). He ended up with a guy so NO, he had the happy ending he was looking for. ie: boyfriend and girl who's just a friend.

    Hey look, I'm 100% gay gay gay and I liked it. One of the audience reviewers lambasted it saying, 'boo it was a sad ending'. Hello? (slight spoiler alert). He ended up with a guy so NO, he had the happy ending he was looking for. ie: boyfriend and girl who's just a friend.

  • Aug 02, 2020

    Definitely different, but a quite enjoyable movie with almost nonstop dialogue between the main characters.

    Definitely different, but a quite enjoyable movie with almost nonstop dialogue between the main characters.

  • Aug 01, 2020

    Witty dialogue and winsome characters. The ending was somewhat unclear, but the love story was great.

    Witty dialogue and winsome characters. The ending was somewhat unclear, but the love story was great.

  • Jul 28, 2020

    This film really upset me. It treats the anti-Latinx racism of a main character's father for laughs, and that racism is egged on by another main character. Why is racism funny, especially in this moment? Racist jokes are still racism. I also found the male lead's mocking treatment of his psychologist, played by a Black woman, to be tinged by racism, as he entitled-ly diminishes her professionalism and expertise. The film is also misogynistic in that it treats women's bodies as disgusting (there's a scene that treats a woman's period as gross) and it marginalizes the female lead. Even though she's a main character, the film does not fill out her story of what appears to be extreme trauma from sexual assault, and instead treats her as merely a sidekick to the male lead's self-discoveries. I'm really disappointed by the non-intersectional nature of this film, how it rightfully asks the audience to empathize with people experiencing homophobia but then invites racism and misogyny into the picture and asks the audience to laugh.

    This film really upset me. It treats the anti-Latinx racism of a main character's father for laughs, and that racism is egged on by another main character. Why is racism funny, especially in this moment? Racist jokes are still racism. I also found the male lead's mocking treatment of his psychologist, played by a Black woman, to be tinged by racism, as he entitled-ly diminishes her professionalism and expertise. The film is also misogynistic in that it treats women's bodies as disgusting (there's a scene that treats a woman's period as gross) and it marginalizes the female lead. Even though she's a main character, the film does not fill out her story of what appears to be extreme trauma from sexual assault, and instead treats her as merely a sidekick to the male lead's self-discoveries. I'm really disappointed by the non-intersectional nature of this film, how it rightfully asks the audience to empathize with people experiencing homophobia but then invites racism and misogyny into the picture and asks the audience to laugh.

  • Jul 23, 2020

    This film was quirky yet touching. Highly recommend.

    This film was quirky yet touching. Highly recommend.

  • Jul 20, 2020

    It was an unexpected and entertaining story. I could have done without the racist monologue that came from an otherwise likable character and was seemingly passed off as acceptable behavior.

    It was an unexpected and entertaining story. I could have done without the racist monologue that came from an otherwise likable character and was seemingly passed off as acceptable behavior.

  • Jul 11, 2020

    #Splat 🤮 So problematic and cliché after cliché. These people aren't likeable or interesting. And the only menton of Spanish/Latinos was a put down to Puerto Ricans and another to Mexicans. Yawn.

    #Splat 🤮 So problematic and cliché after cliché. These people aren't likeable or interesting. And the only menton of Spanish/Latinos was a put down to Puerto Ricans and another to Mexicans. Yawn.