The Stunt Man - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Stunt Man Reviews

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June 22, 2016
Brilliant fast and furious hilarious!
March 31, 2016
It was a bit boring for me...
February 22, 2016
Peter O'Toole should have won the Oscar.
January 5, 2016
Illusion, morality and paranoia -- Richard Rush writes and directs not only a great story about such dangerous subjects, but continuously plays the audience in the same way he shows the protagonist being played, prompting us to question what should be real, proper and/or suspicious. The depth of metaphor and polemics in this film may only be fully answered by watching Rush's brilliant "The Sinister Saga of Making 'The Stunt Man.'" O'Toole is riveting as both the character in the movie, and in his recounting of the making of the movie in 'Sinister Saga.'
December 5, 2014
The movie struggled to convince me of its premise--that this director, however eccentric, would really have reason to put this fellow in unnecessary danger.
½ October 19, 2014
Com o tempo "The Stunt Man" pode até ter perdido alguma da sua relevância de filme pós-Vietname, mas manteve intactas as suas qualidades como peça de cinema arriscado e positivamente enlouquecido (ainda que estruturado de maneira lúcida e até mesmo brilhante). Apesar de uma produção e de um lançamento acidentados, "The Stunt Man" parece bastante confortável na pele de quebra-cabeças matreiro e isso transparece num filme que se diverte ao mesmo tempo que nos diverte (com uma abundância de cenas espectaculares e uma novela que tem tanto de pateta como de envolvente). Além disso, merece um lugarzinho na divisão à parte de filmes sobre filmes.
½ July 27, 2014
A movie about the movie business is always refreshing, but this one is somewhat of an oddity as it's seemingly a satire focused on egomaniac director rater than more or less a realistic depiction of movie making. Perhaps it was ahead of its time with its multidimensional story, but by today's standards, it's really nothing extraordinary.
May 16, 2014
A must-see for anyone interested in the philosophical implications of the filmmaking process. Steve Railsback is a mentally-unbalanced Vietnam vet on the run from the law. After accidentally causing the death of a movie stunt man, he stumbles onto the set of the film in question. Instantly in love with the leading lady (Barbara Hershey), he agrees at the insistence of megalomaniacal director Peter O'Toole (in one of his greatest film performances) to stay on as a replacement for the fallen stunt driver. In exchange for not turning Railsback over to the police, O'Toole tells Railsback that he must also assume the stunt man's identity so that O'Toole can finish his location shoot in time and on budget. The paranoid Railsback begins to suspect that O'Toole is really a psychopath who wants to kill him; Hershey, who idolizes O'Toole, tries to convince Railsback that he's delusional...but as time goes on and on-set pressures mount, even she begins to question the director's intentions. Many will be frustrated by this film's determinedly enigmatic approach to narrative and theme, but it's a damn fun ride that leaves the viewer plenty to think about at the end. A satire as well as a thriller, this semi-forgotten film is probably the best film of 1980 (Raging Bull notwithstanding). A film lover's film.
Super Reviewer
April 15, 2014
A movie of intrigue but lacking in the craft needed to make it a classic.There are enough twists to keep it entertaining but it is not terribly memorable.
February 23, 2014
I didn't understand a word of this but I found this to be utterly fascinating.
February 21, 2014
A crazy story about a controlling and ambitious director doing anything to get his shot. It is all about perception and what is real and what is just movie magic. Once again, Peter O'Toole rises above what seems to be a one-note character to give a layered and cynical performance as the director who hires a fugitive as one of his stunt men.

Grade: B
February 17, 2014
I love movies about making movies so I'd been wanting to see this for a while, it's a got a great set up, and for the most part i enjoyed it, the scenes within the film and the behind the scenes stuff are really good, but the love story was pretty weak, i couldnt believe she would fall for him, he was kinda bland, however i wasnt a fan of how this resolved, its not what happens exactly, but how they do it just felt off to me idk, but otoole is great here, one of his finest performances
January 8, 2014
Once you give in to its charms, it stays with you forever
December 19, 2013
Rush's cult classic is arguably one of the most remarkable and entertaining satires and black comedies about films and filmmaking as it has that extra bite. However, apart from taking obvious digs at the world of cinema, it intelligently refers to other things and particularly the Vietnam War, an element that greatly contributes to a less restricted viewpoint on what really differentiates the fact with the fiction - or in this world the cinematic truth and the non-cinematic one. Apart from its cleverness, the film is genuinely entertaining, exciting and very often funny thanks to a great screenplay but also some ace performances by the cast headed by a magnificent Peter O'Toole. In one of his most memorable turns, he plays the part of the director, a puppet master whose obsession and suavity make him elegantly dangerous.
December 15, 2013
One of the 80s best films, the line between movies and reality blur in a brilliant film rife with metaphor. Peter O'Toole gives the performance of his career as God-like director Eli Cross, with Steve Railsback not far behind as Cameron, a Vietnam vet on the run who takes Cross on his offer to stand in for a stunt man that died to provide cover for both. Criminally ignored, this film is Beyond Essential. Watch it NOW!
December 14, 2013
Love this movie legendary!
October 13, 2013
I should have liked this more I feel. Unfortunately Steve Rainsback as the main character gives a TERRIBLE performance. He continually took me out of the movie. Every time he "plays angry," it's just so bad. Maybe a part of the problem is the writing for his character, I can't tell for sure, but I can't remember the last time I hated a character so much due in large part to an actor with such a major role. His performance infects the whole movie; I can't tell if Barbara Hershey was bad as well, if the script was bad to awful, or if its all due to Railsback's performance crippling the movie. Peter O'Toole was still pretty good, and the direction was good despite some weird choices (probably in relation to the script). I think this movie could officially signify the end of the "Vietnam vet struggling with the war" character in movies from around the time (of course Rambo and I'm sure others are still down the road), in this movie that motif really starts to get old real fast. It would have been interesting to see what this movie could have been with a good actor instead of Railsback in it, someone with even an once of charm/charisma, or acting ability.
October 8, 2013
"Its just like we're in a movie" an escaped convict( Steve Railsback ) utters as he pulls, what he thinks is a drowning old lady ( Barbara Hershey ) ,from the water. When she pulls her makeup and wig off to reveal she is really the leading lady,our convict,who is really an extension of us , has fallen into the world of a movie set,where nothing is to be taken at face value , and everything is for the camera's perspective.

Richard Rush's , The Stunt Man is one of the best films about filmmaking, or I should say ,about the deception that is filmmaking, after all as one line in the film says. "KIng Kong was only 3 foot 6 inches tall ".

In a twist of fate ,our convict is hired by Eli Cross, the megalomaniac director of the film to replace the stunt man who just died during one of the stunts.Then as he learns his craft and falls in love with the leading lady, he soon has to come to grips with his own sense of reality ,as it plays against the phony reality of a movie set. Steve Railsback's uncomfortable child like performance works well against the rest of the cast's arrogant haughty artsy persona's, making his character feel like it never quite fits into their world.
The real jewel in this film is Peter O'toole's performance as Eli Cross. He attacks this role with all the depth of a shakespearian character, as he manipulates all the players on his set, and you soon realize he will stop at nothing to get the shot he wants.
His performance was Oscar worthy, but he did not win,but Hollywood corrected that error by awarding him the following year for a lesser role in My Favourite Year.
Dominic Frontiere's music is reminiscent of The Sting and gives the film an almost silent film era feel.
I would have rated this film higher except some of it does feel a bit dated,but do yourself a favour and see the underated gem.
½ August 12, 2013
I was partly expecting an action movie, but this is more a black comedy about an unscrupulous director (played with relish by Peter O'Toole), who exploits a runaway fugitive to be a stuntman in his movie following the death of his original stuntman during the production.
This is up there with T. E. Lawrence as Peter O'Toole's great performances, with good support from Steve Railsback & Barbara Hershey.
July 12, 2013
A not-very-good comedy trying to be philosophical. Very dated as well. Luv Peter always.
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