Summer Palace Reviews

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January 15, 2008
A torrid sexual romance between two students at Beijing University set against the backdrop of changes simmering in China in 1989.
January 15, 2008
Combines flashes of insight and scintillating cinematography -- grainy, fumbling, light-blinded -- with stretches of inscrutable mediocrity.
January 14, 2008
In truth, I've never seen so much lovemaking in an aboveground film, but the revelation, and great triumph, of Lou's work is that these scenes are never pornographic -- that is, never separated from emotion.
January 11, 2008
Ye's back-and-forth storytelling insinuates that the lives of Yu Hong and Zhou Wei are incomplete without each other, but because their young love was never convincing in the first place, the bittersweet conclusion rings hollow.
January 11, 2008
With Summer Palace, Lou Ye speaks more plainly in his own voice, tired at last of affecting Wong Kar Wai's florid style of filmmaking, though he is still treading the Wongian terrain of lovelorn melodrama.
August 25, 2007
It's one of the more memorable films in years.
April 19, 2007
This is just the sort of film the festival should be bringing to town, because it's unlikely to show up anywhere else. Rambling and intimate, it plays like the diary of a young woman who makes many, many mistakes, most of them with men.
October 10, 2006
October 10, 2006
September 14, 2006
Way too long for something with this little content.
May 18, 2006
An occasionally involving but way over-stretched tapestry.
May 18, 2006
Lou has created a remarkable portrait of a headstrong woman and a generation of Chinese that still finds itself at a crossroads in that country's history.
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