Sunday Too Far Away Reviews

  • Jun 28, 2020

    Very accurate depiction of the Australia I grew up in, the shearing get she'd scenes and pubs a true to life, and acting brilliant

    Very accurate depiction of the Australia I grew up in, the shearing get she'd scenes and pubs a true to life, and acting brilliant

  • May 17, 2020

    best movie on the subject of sheep shearing

    best movie on the subject of sheep shearing

  • Feb 07, 2017

    Masculine, no frills drama about blokes in the outback making a living as shearers. Jack Thomson is particularly memorable, but the film is just a good, solid yarn.

    Masculine, no frills drama about blokes in the outback making a living as shearers. Jack Thomson is particularly memorable, but the film is just a good, solid yarn.

  • May 01, 2015

    A true blue Aussie Drama about Sheep Sheerer's in the mid 50's In rural Australia. It's more of a fly on the wall approach to Aussie Blokes & who they say they are & what they really are. Jack Thompson is superb as lead & brings a lot to the table, but he is undeniably supported by some terrific talent. The film has a great blend of humor & drama & although the story is quite linear it doesn't really drag & keeps you enthralled. One of the simpler Aussie films of the mid 1970's.

    A true blue Aussie Drama about Sheep Sheerer's in the mid 50's In rural Australia. It's more of a fly on the wall approach to Aussie Blokes & who they say they are & what they really are. Jack Thompson is superb as lead & brings a lot to the table, but he is undeniably supported by some terrific talent. The film has a great blend of humor & drama & although the story is quite linear it doesn't really drag & keeps you enthralled. One of the simpler Aussie films of the mid 1970's.

  • Apr 15, 2015

    At first this film seems like a series of shearer's yarns - the main narrative line seems pretty thin at times, but like Robert Altman's films this episodic meandering narrative works extremely well despite defying the accepted wisdom on how film narrative is supposed to work. Once upon a time in Australia, hard work was considered a virtue. A man gained respect by how well and fast he could do hard, physical work. Sure the money was good but it was not about the money. The Jack Thompson character gains the respect of other men because he has been the best shearer at every shed he has worked at for the last 10 years. But sooner or later, no matter how good you are someone will be better than you. Sooner or later, you will reach your peak and then some day a younger ambitious person will surpass you. Sooner or later you will die and before that most people get old. Self esteem is a complex and delicate thing. We should not gain it from one ability alone. Despite a masterly ensemble performance, the great Max Cullen in a supporting role steals the show on any scene he is in

    At first this film seems like a series of shearer's yarns - the main narrative line seems pretty thin at times, but like Robert Altman's films this episodic meandering narrative works extremely well despite defying the accepted wisdom on how film narrative is supposed to work. Once upon a time in Australia, hard work was considered a virtue. A man gained respect by how well and fast he could do hard, physical work. Sure the money was good but it was not about the money. The Jack Thompson character gains the respect of other men because he has been the best shearer at every shed he has worked at for the last 10 years. But sooner or later, no matter how good you are someone will be better than you. Sooner or later, you will reach your peak and then some day a younger ambitious person will surpass you. Sooner or later you will die and before that most people get old. Self esteem is a complex and delicate thing. We should not gain it from one ability alone. Despite a masterly ensemble performance, the great Max Cullen in a supporting role steals the show on any scene he is in

  • Jun 20, 2014

    awesome historical drama and the first of what has been labeled 'austrailian new wave'

    awesome historical drama and the first of what has been labeled 'austrailian new wave'

  • Mar 19, 2013

    best bloody aussie movie ever.

    best bloody aussie movie ever.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Jan 30, 2013

    It wasn't the money. It was the bloody insult. As Foley(Jack Thompson) tells it over after who knows how many beers, his plan is to work for a few years shearing sheep before retiring to the coast. To put him in this general direction, his old friend Tim King(Max Cullen), now a contractor, hires Foley for a job but not before he settles a bar bet in his favor. Along the way, they collect others, including Michael(Gregory Apps), a young roustabout, to take to the ranch where the most important element is having enough lemon essence for Quinn(Ken Weaver), the cook. Its opening car crash notwithstanding, "Sunday Too Far Away" gets off to a rough start, populated as it is with references to the backbreaking profession of sheep shearing.(I had to look up what a roustabout is which cleared up a thing or two.) But as time goes on, this is less about the profession than the cult of masculinity in the Australian outback where men are real men, women are real women and the sheep are really nervous and we get a very clear idea where such a life of hard living will eventually lead.(I was surprised not to see any signs of prostitution. Otherwise, there is not that much for the men to do in their down time, except drink and inspect tomorrow's sheep.) As such, the movie is full of symbolism, like the rams(not the St. Louis variety, either) being the first ones to be shorn, with a special admonition to be very careful.(There is a running competition amongst the men as to who is best.) On the other hand, maybe it is not all symbolic in this gritty movie, as sometimes doing laundry is just doing laundry, even stark naked.

    It wasn't the money. It was the bloody insult. As Foley(Jack Thompson) tells it over after who knows how many beers, his plan is to work for a few years shearing sheep before retiring to the coast. To put him in this general direction, his old friend Tim King(Max Cullen), now a contractor, hires Foley for a job but not before he settles a bar bet in his favor. Along the way, they collect others, including Michael(Gregory Apps), a young roustabout, to take to the ranch where the most important element is having enough lemon essence for Quinn(Ken Weaver), the cook. Its opening car crash notwithstanding, "Sunday Too Far Away" gets off to a rough start, populated as it is with references to the backbreaking profession of sheep shearing.(I had to look up what a roustabout is which cleared up a thing or two.) But as time goes on, this is less about the profession than the cult of masculinity in the Australian outback where men are real men, women are real women and the sheep are really nervous and we get a very clear idea where such a life of hard living will eventually lead.(I was surprised not to see any signs of prostitution. Otherwise, there is not that much for the men to do in their down time, except drink and inspect tomorrow's sheep.) As such, the movie is full of symbolism, like the rams(not the St. Louis variety, either) being the first ones to be shorn, with a special admonition to be very careful.(There is a running competition amongst the men as to who is best.) On the other hand, maybe it is not all symbolic in this gritty movie, as sometimes doing laundry is just doing laundry, even stark naked.

  • Nov 16, 2011

    Not the most exciting of movies but interesting from an Australian perspective, nonetheless.

    Not the most exciting of movies but interesting from an Australian perspective, nonetheless.

  • Sep 28, 2011

    I really liked this movie, it was very nostalgic for me having grown up in a small Australian town, the performances were generally good (Jack Thompson is particularly endearing), and it was just a great evocation of the issues and concerns of a certain breed of male. I'm only giving it 7/10 because the ending fell apart a little bit, introducing several new unnecessary threads and ending with a one of those annoying "title-cards-to-resolve-everything" sequences, but definitely a recommendation

    I really liked this movie, it was very nostalgic for me having grown up in a small Australian town, the performances were generally good (Jack Thompson is particularly endearing), and it was just a great evocation of the issues and concerns of a certain breed of male. I'm only giving it 7/10 because the ending fell apart a little bit, introducing several new unnecessary threads and ending with a one of those annoying "title-cards-to-resolve-everything" sequences, but definitely a recommendation