Swimming To Cambodia (2003)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Movie Info

A performance by acclaimed monologue artist Spalding Gray is captured in this unusually sparse but effective concert film. Gray's main topic is his experiences playing a small role in The Killing Fields, which serves as a launching pad for a series of fascinating anecdotes and much humorous philosophizing.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Comedy , Drama , Musical & Performing Arts , Special Interest
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Cinecom Pictures

Cast

Critic Reviews for Swimming To Cambodia

All Critics (9) | Top Critics (1)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | March 25, 2009
Variety
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | June 23, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

May 20, 2003
New York Times
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Washington Post
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Washington Post
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Swimming To Cambodia

Gray pulls together genocide, pleasure-seeking, military paranoia, filmmaking, and even an anecdote about rude neighbors to paint a coherent portrait of aggression.

Lee Mayo
Lee Mayo
½

A fantastic monologue that was unfortunately shortened for this film. Demme can't pick if he wants this to be a performance piece with Gray acting BIG and subtle sets or more realistic depiction with no backgrounds and audience reactions. Still, since it's Spalding Gray, it's HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Anatoly Shashkin
Anatoly Shashkin

Can't say if I enjoyed this or 'Gray's Anatomy' more, but one things for sure; I love Spalding Gray and these monologue films are definitely my bag. 'Swimming' is essentially a gigantic hubris-filled, self-centered odyssey about Gray's own role in Roland Joffe's 1983 film 'The Killing Fields,' where he had about three lines. The obscurity of the premise is what makes this 'show' so interesting; he spins what could be a simple conversation into a full-blown theater piece. And, Gray sheds a lot of deep, eye-opening opinions about the Cambodian conflict on which 'Fields' is based. The only touchy thing is that Jonathan Demme 'directed' this; the film essentially switches between three cameras, and the Demme thing is just prestige. Some TV station cameraman probably filmed the whole thing. Regardless, it's a fun and hilarious trip into the psyche of a (sadly) dead man. Can't wait to see 'Monster In A Box' now.

Cory Beaudoin
Cory Beaudoin

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