Taiyo o nusunda otoko (The Man Who Stole the Sun) Reviews

  • Jul 04, 2020

    Cringy, annoying, and nonsensical

    Cringy, annoying, and nonsensical

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Jul 31, 2015

    By day, Makoto ' Bubblegum' Kido(Kenji Sawada) is a mild-mannered high school science teacher. By night, he steals a gun which he then uses to steal plutonium from a nuclear power plant. His plans get interrupted when a World War II veteran(Yunosuke Ito) hijacks the full school bus he was trying to sleep on. Thankfully, Makato and Inspector Yamashita(Bunta Sugawara) are able to subdue the hijacker, allowing Makato to return to his plans. You must forgive "The Man who Stole the Sun" for being a little on the long side, for it has a lot of territory to cover. Among the issues that it explores that are important to Japan when this was made in 1979 and no less relevant today are standardized testing, baseball games being interrupted on television(apparently Japan has never had its Heidi Bowl), nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear power in general, the lack of decent rock music, treatment of war veterans, and the general stagnation of society. This is nowhere near as dry as it sounds, as the movie handles such difficult topics in a frenetic and suspenseful fashion that is also deliberately over the top at times. All of which is in the service of also showing how heroes can also be villains and vice versa.

    By day, Makoto ' Bubblegum' Kido(Kenji Sawada) is a mild-mannered high school science teacher. By night, he steals a gun which he then uses to steal plutonium from a nuclear power plant. His plans get interrupted when a World War II veteran(Yunosuke Ito) hijacks the full school bus he was trying to sleep on. Thankfully, Makato and Inspector Yamashita(Bunta Sugawara) are able to subdue the hijacker, allowing Makato to return to his plans. You must forgive "The Man who Stole the Sun" for being a little on the long side, for it has a lot of territory to cover. Among the issues that it explores that are important to Japan when this was made in 1979 and no less relevant today are standardized testing, baseball games being interrupted on television(apparently Japan has never had its Heidi Bowl), nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear power in general, the lack of decent rock music, treatment of war veterans, and the general stagnation of society. This is nowhere near as dry as it sounds, as the movie handles such difficult topics in a frenetic and suspenseful fashion that is also deliberately over the top at times. All of which is in the service of also showing how heroes can also be villains and vice versa.

  • Jun 20, 2012

    Um japonês solitário faz uma bomba nuclear em casa e ameaça detonar no centro de Tokio. Em troca, pede que sejam supridos os desejos mais comuns, como assistir uma partida de beisebol. Muito interessante os dilemas à (C)ticos que passam os personagens. O filme à (C) uma alegoria pra discutir o poder dos governos, o espetáculo da mídia, a apatia do cidadão e outras misà (C)rias da vida moderna. Triste, mas essencial pra entender esses terroristas sem causa.

    Um japonês solitário faz uma bomba nuclear em casa e ameaça detonar no centro de Tokio. Em troca, pede que sejam supridos os desejos mais comuns, como assistir uma partida de beisebol. Muito interessante os dilemas à (C)ticos que passam os personagens. O filme à (C) uma alegoria pra discutir o poder dos governos, o espetáculo da mídia, a apatia do cidadão e outras misà (C)rias da vida moderna. Triste, mas essencial pra entender esses terroristas sem causa.

  • Dec 25, 2011

    I really love this film (if you can understand Japanese). It really shows Showa-era Japan for what it is and above all else, provides a substantial, well-arranged plot that surprises you even if you know what's going to happen.

    I really love this film (if you can understand Japanese). It really shows Showa-era Japan for what it is and above all else, provides a substantial, well-arranged plot that surprises you even if you know what's going to happen.

  • Oct 15, 2011

    This is a cool big-budget Japanese movie from the late 70's, in which a trendy young high-school science teacher Kido Masato (nicknamed Bubble Gum by his students) somehow makes a nuclear bomb in his Tokyo studio apartment by breaking into a nuclear reactor station and stealing plutonium, in order to hold Tokyo to ransom for his rather odd demands. The movie plays on the public's fear of nuclear weapons, but whether or not you're scared depends on how far you're willing to suspend your disbelief. After some early attempts at political commentary, it turns into a full-blown action movie, with endless jaw-dropping stunts which includes a fantastic high speed chase on the streets of Tokyo as our anti-hero is pursued by detective Yamashita throughout the movie. However serious you might think this movie is at first will have you scratching your heads at the ridiculous things that happen in the final third of the movie. Detective Yamashita is quite literally The Terminator as he dodges explosions, survives falling from a great height by a helicopter and then won't die from 6 or 7 bullets to the body including 2 to the heart. Although overlong at 2 and a half hours, this movie is constantly mad, OTT, unpredictable and unintentionally amusing. I really enjoyed it and I don't think I've ever seen anything like it. Highly recommended.

    This is a cool big-budget Japanese movie from the late 70's, in which a trendy young high-school science teacher Kido Masato (nicknamed Bubble Gum by his students) somehow makes a nuclear bomb in his Tokyo studio apartment by breaking into a nuclear reactor station and stealing plutonium, in order to hold Tokyo to ransom for his rather odd demands. The movie plays on the public's fear of nuclear weapons, but whether or not you're scared depends on how far you're willing to suspend your disbelief. After some early attempts at political commentary, it turns into a full-blown action movie, with endless jaw-dropping stunts which includes a fantastic high speed chase on the streets of Tokyo as our anti-hero is pursued by detective Yamashita throughout the movie. However serious you might think this movie is at first will have you scratching your heads at the ridiculous things that happen in the final third of the movie. Detective Yamashita is quite literally The Terminator as he dodges explosions, survives falling from a great height by a helicopter and then won't die from 6 or 7 bullets to the body including 2 to the heart. Although overlong at 2 and a half hours, this movie is constantly mad, OTT, unpredictable and unintentionally amusing. I really enjoyed it and I don't think I've ever seen anything like it. Highly recommended.

  • Nov 14, 2010

    This film is pretty much the only rock'n'roll Japanese film I've ever known, mentioning pretty much all things Japanese people usually hesitate to do so such as the Emperor, atomic bomb, unjust of media, and those unstated so-called social rules. Besides that, it's also packed with full of Hollywood-style actions, proving that it's possible to make a great action film in Japan, too. In all senses, this film deserves to be a legend.

    This film is pretty much the only rock'n'roll Japanese film I've ever known, mentioning pretty much all things Japanese people usually hesitate to do so such as the Emperor, atomic bomb, unjust of media, and those unstated so-called social rules. Besides that, it's also packed with full of Hollywood-style actions, proving that it's possible to make a great action film in Japan, too. In all senses, this film deserves to be a legend.

  • Jan 13, 2009

    The film's title alludes to the Greek myth of Prometheus, a titan who was duly punished after stealing fire from Zeus to give to man. The film itself works as a satirical allegory with characters and places substituting for bigger themes and ideas. In The Man Who Stole the Sun, a high-school science teacher steals isotopes from a nuclear power plant to build his own A-bomb. Clearly when Mr. Kido (aka number 9) single-handedly robs a nuclear reactor at the musical accompaniment of Space Invaders, it's safe to assume that that the movie isn't so much concerned with dramatic realism as it is with taking the story's constructs beyond its initial starting point. The first act deals with a gun-toting lunatic who takes Mr. Kido and a busload of students hostage. He demands to have a word with the Emperor. After the lunatic's fatal blotched attempt Mr. Kido is recognized as a public hero alongside a police officer whom he would later secretly anoint as his personal nemesis. Filled with renewed optimism Mr. Kido steals an isotope from a power plant and works on transforming it into an Atomic bomb from the confines of his livingroom. The other act deals with the puzzling dilemma that most of us face after building one, 'what now?' First he takes the city hostage by extorting the government to extend the television coverage of a baseball game. After befriending a popular disc jockey, he spreads his agenda through the airwaves and demands the government to bring back the Rolling Stones, "you're the government, you can do anything!". But what is Mr. Kido's agenda? Hell if he knows. If the first two acts are thoughtfully provoking, the third act lazily resorts to standard thriller conventions-- filled with car-chases, excessive gun-violence, and indecisive false-endings. When the film changes gears from satire-stabbing critical thinking to mere action-driven entertainment it's hard not to feel a little let down. In an ironic twist of fate director Hasegawa also seems uncertain with what to do next with such a controversially potent subject matter. Much like the gun-toting lunatic or that of Mr. Kido's confusion after the acquisition of the bomb, Hasegawa's lack of confidence in dealing with a bigger vision becomes the film's own undoing-- contrast that to the uncompromising voice of Kubrik's in Dr. Strangelove, a film which deals similarly in tone and theme. Hasegawa's inability to communicate the film's interest undermines any effect it tries to instill on its audience. But despite its messy bits The Man Who Stole the Sun is a fascinating work that delves into the anxiety of the Coldwar, the heartfelt fears of another nuclear catastrophe, and the paralyzing effect those fears and anxieties have on its people.

    The film's title alludes to the Greek myth of Prometheus, a titan who was duly punished after stealing fire from Zeus to give to man. The film itself works as a satirical allegory with characters and places substituting for bigger themes and ideas. In The Man Who Stole the Sun, a high-school science teacher steals isotopes from a nuclear power plant to build his own A-bomb. Clearly when Mr. Kido (aka number 9) single-handedly robs a nuclear reactor at the musical accompaniment of Space Invaders, it's safe to assume that that the movie isn't so much concerned with dramatic realism as it is with taking the story's constructs beyond its initial starting point. The first act deals with a gun-toting lunatic who takes Mr. Kido and a busload of students hostage. He demands to have a word with the Emperor. After the lunatic's fatal blotched attempt Mr. Kido is recognized as a public hero alongside a police officer whom he would later secretly anoint as his personal nemesis. Filled with renewed optimism Mr. Kido steals an isotope from a power plant and works on transforming it into an Atomic bomb from the confines of his livingroom. The other act deals with the puzzling dilemma that most of us face after building one, 'what now?' First he takes the city hostage by extorting the government to extend the television coverage of a baseball game. After befriending a popular disc jockey, he spreads his agenda through the airwaves and demands the government to bring back the Rolling Stones, "you're the government, you can do anything!". But what is Mr. Kido's agenda? Hell if he knows. If the first two acts are thoughtfully provoking, the third act lazily resorts to standard thriller conventions-- filled with car-chases, excessive gun-violence, and indecisive false-endings. When the film changes gears from satire-stabbing critical thinking to mere action-driven entertainment it's hard not to feel a little let down. In an ironic twist of fate director Hasegawa also seems uncertain with what to do next with such a controversially potent subject matter. Much like the gun-toting lunatic or that of Mr. Kido's confusion after the acquisition of the bomb, Hasegawa's lack of confidence in dealing with a bigger vision becomes the film's own undoing-- contrast that to the uncompromising voice of Kubrik's in Dr. Strangelove, a film which deals similarly in tone and theme. Hasegawa's inability to communicate the film's interest undermines any effect it tries to instill on its audience. But despite its messy bits The Man Who Stole the Sun is a fascinating work that delves into the anxiety of the Coldwar, the heartfelt fears of another nuclear catastrophe, and the paralyzing effect those fears and anxieties have on its people.

  • Oct 28, 2007

    This film is so extraordinary. The crazy ideas and charactors, the way story unfold... but it still captures those blank feeling anyone might experience in a modern life. So sarcastically funny and entertaining with speeded up actions towards the end :)

    This film is so extraordinary. The crazy ideas and charactors, the way story unfold... but it still captures those blank feeling anyone might experience in a modern life. So sarcastically funny and entertaining with speeded up actions towards the end :)

  • Jul 03, 2007

    if any channel decides to cut off a baseball game, an atomic bomb will be set off... i like the idea =) go dodgers

    if any channel decides to cut off a baseball game, an atomic bomb will be set off... i like the idea =) go dodgers

  • Jun 06, 2007

    greatest. atomic.bomb.story.EVER.

    greatest. atomic.bomb.story.EVER.