Jûsangô taihi-sen ori: Sono gôshô o nerae (Take Aim at the Police Van) Reviews

  • Jun 17, 2020

    An early Seijun Suzuki noir that oozes class, style and story. Great, great stuff and an early indicator of some of the tremendous and at times slightly subversive films Suzuki had in store for us in years to come. A classic from a master.

    An early Seijun Suzuki noir that oozes class, style and story. Great, great stuff and an early indicator of some of the tremendous and at times slightly subversive films Suzuki had in store for us in years to come. A classic from a master.

  • Aug 05, 2015

    Delving into the Nikkatsu Noir set, this is the first selection I've tried and I have to say that it's pretty damned entertaining for a first Noir outing in Japan for me, and I look forward to the rest of the set. Check it out.

    Delving into the Nikkatsu Noir set, this is the first selection I've tried and I have to say that it's pretty damned entertaining for a first Noir outing in Japan for me, and I look forward to the rest of the set. Check it out.

  • Mar 31, 2014

    good tale of revenge and payback

    good tale of revenge and payback

  • Aug 19, 2012

    One of Seijun Suzuki's earlier works, he's not all out and crazy at this point, but he's more of a confident director of action and crime films. "Take Aim At The Police Van" was adapted from a short crime story, but through the point of view of a prison guard who is on suspension for supposed 'negligence', but decides to get to the bottom of a crime that ended with some prisoners dead. It's a pretty gripping story and mystery that goes deeper and deeper until we see some pretty unexpected drama by the end. Standard noir-ish stuff, with some forgotten 50's Nikkatsu players, but of very good quality in filmmaking nonetheless.

    One of Seijun Suzuki's earlier works, he's not all out and crazy at this point, but he's more of a confident director of action and crime films. "Take Aim At The Police Van" was adapted from a short crime story, but through the point of view of a prison guard who is on suspension for supposed 'negligence', but decides to get to the bottom of a crime that ended with some prisoners dead. It's a pretty gripping story and mystery that goes deeper and deeper until we see some pretty unexpected drama by the end. Standard noir-ish stuff, with some forgotten 50's Nikkatsu players, but of very good quality in filmmaking nonetheless.

  • Feb 19, 2012

    One of Suzuki's pre-1963 "normal" movies, and yes it is a masterpiece. If this had made at Columbia Pictures at this time, it would have entered the canon.

    One of Suzuki's pre-1963 "normal" movies, and yes it is a masterpiece. If this had made at Columbia Pictures at this time, it would have entered the canon.

  • Nov 23, 2011

    one of the best titles ever in a good but not great early Suzuki film

    one of the best titles ever in a good but not great early Suzuki film

  • Oct 08, 2011

    Early Suzuki is not as accomplished or daring as his later stuff, but it's still fun to watch. It's a pretty traditional 'whodunnit'. It focuses more on the mystery than any of the characters, but it definitely had me interested to find out who the identity of the "big bad". Although the revelation is less than spectacular, the gorgeous cinematography and fast-paced plot kept me interested. The fact that the running time is only 79 minutes definitely helps.

    Early Suzuki is not as accomplished or daring as his later stuff, but it's still fun to watch. It's a pretty traditional 'whodunnit'. It focuses more on the mystery than any of the characters, but it definitely had me interested to find out who the identity of the "big bad". Although the revelation is less than spectacular, the gorgeous cinematography and fast-paced plot kept me interested. The fact that the running time is only 79 minutes definitely helps.

  • Oct 04, 2011

    This Nikkatsu production finds a prison guard under suspension for six months after a police van is attacked and two inmates are killed. Tamon decides to investigate the killings on his own time, and discovers an underworld of deceit. The plot starts off pretty good, but the main character has very little to no charisma. If Joe Shashido were in his place, it wouldn't work because Joe is a cool guy, while this actor is a bit ho hum and never intriguing. It does have the trademark noir moments, such as death traps or surprise kills. The twist isn't very effective and the ending is pretty lacking. One of the lesser entries in the Nikkatsu Noir Criterion Collection.

    This Nikkatsu production finds a prison guard under suspension for six months after a police van is attacked and two inmates are killed. Tamon decides to investigate the killings on his own time, and discovers an underworld of deceit. The plot starts off pretty good, but the main character has very little to no charisma. If Joe Shashido were in his place, it wouldn't work because Joe is a cool guy, while this actor is a bit ho hum and never intriguing. It does have the trademark noir moments, such as death traps or surprise kills. The twist isn't very effective and the ending is pretty lacking. One of the lesser entries in the Nikkatsu Noir Criterion Collection.

  • Sep 06, 2011

    A convoluted who-done-it in which a prison officer tries to uncover who gunned down two prisoners in his care and why they were killed. It would have been much better if it spent more time developing the characters and conflict instead of abruptly jumping from scene to scene, confusing the viewer and making us play catch-up.

    A convoluted who-done-it in which a prison officer tries to uncover who gunned down two prisoners in his care and why they were killed. It would have been much better if it spent more time developing the characters and conflict instead of abruptly jumping from scene to scene, confusing the viewer and making us play catch-up.

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    Chris B Super Reviewer
    Jun 15, 2011

    As one of Suzuki's first feature works, Take Aim at the Police Van is a dark and wonderfully lensed film that perfectly represents the Nikkatsu Noir genre. Black and White and stunningly beautiful, the film drips with style and the story is gripping the entire run time. If you're into Japanese, Noir, or just stylish films this is definitely worth a watch!

    As one of Suzuki's first feature works, Take Aim at the Police Van is a dark and wonderfully lensed film that perfectly represents the Nikkatsu Noir genre. Black and White and stunningly beautiful, the film drips with style and the story is gripping the entire run time. If you're into Japanese, Noir, or just stylish films this is definitely worth a watch!