Take Me Out to the Ball Game Reviews

  • Apr 04, 2020

    Strike one: Coming right off the heels of WWII, the chauvinistic display of nationalism is understandable, but in numbers like "Strictly U.S.A."—where every face is strictly white—the appeal to an overriding sense of exclusionary patriotism lands like a pop-up fly. Strike two: The chauvinist treatment of women would be as appalling as the jingoism, if it weren't simultaneously (if unintentionally) undercut by all the song-and-dance, which gives the whole affair a sense of gender performativity, a mere wink away from sliding into sheer camp. Strike three: Ultimately, compared to the other collaborations between Kelly and Sinatra, this one is a swing and a miss.

    Strike one: Coming right off the heels of WWII, the chauvinistic display of nationalism is understandable, but in numbers like "Strictly U.S.A."—where every face is strictly white—the appeal to an overriding sense of exclusionary patriotism lands like a pop-up fly. Strike two: The chauvinist treatment of women would be as appalling as the jingoism, if it weren't simultaneously (if unintentionally) undercut by all the song-and-dance, which gives the whole affair a sense of gender performativity, a mere wink away from sliding into sheer camp. Strike three: Ultimately, compared to the other collaborations between Kelly and Sinatra, this one is a swing and a miss.

  • Oct 08, 2019

    Pleasant little musical.

    Pleasant little musical.

  • Sep 09, 2019

    "On The Town" and this movie were made about the same time with many of the same cast members. "On The Town" was good, "Take Me Out To The Ball Game" not so good. Good talent, unimpressive material.

    "On The Town" and this movie were made about the same time with many of the same cast members. "On The Town" was good, "Take Me Out To The Ball Game" not so good. Good talent, unimpressive material.

  • May 08, 2019

    The best musical movie ever made!

    The best musical movie ever made!

  • Oct 13, 2018

    Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a decent film. It is about two turn-of-the-century baseball players. Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Busby Berkeley did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the humor and romance.

    Take Me Out to the Ball Game is a decent film. It is about two turn-of-the-century baseball players. Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Busby Berkeley did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the humor and romance.

  • Jul 22, 2018

    Baseball is a good sport but if there is singing involved that’s another thing which just leads to be not up to my standards, you will realize musicals are not one of my thing. I do like sports

    Baseball is a good sport but if there is singing involved that’s another thing which just leads to be not up to my standards, you will realize musicals are not one of my thing. I do like sports

  • Jul 03, 2016

    post WWII baseball musical set in 1906

    post WWII baseball musical set in 1906

  • Jun 15, 2016

    Since I'm too preoccupied with "Singin' in the Rain" to allow myself to readily allow for any Gene Kelly starring musical into my heart without a multitude of comparisons first, I found that I liked 1949's "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" a lot more when I forced myself to let my guard down. Because really, the two aren't so homogenous. Where "Singin' in the Rain" is a drivingly ambitious opera of musical satire, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is an easygoing studio project more willing to serve as a vehicle for its starry cast than it is to change cinema. And because it's directed by Busby Berkeley ("42nd Street," "The Gang's All Here"), a maestro of the genre, and because it is headlined not just by Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire but also by the Million Dollar Mermaid herself, Esther Williams, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is a pastime perhaps too pretty and too pleasureful to pass up, despite its shortcomings. It's a commonplace musical saved by its undemanding affability, a strength many formulaic musicals of the time managed to consistently unleash. I guess Technicolor and attractive leads can do that to you. Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra star as Eddie O'Brien and Dennis Ryan, a close-knit pair of baseball stars as serious about their careers as they are bent on someday more seriously pursuing a vaudeville act. Part of the Wolves, a fictional American League team, the men and their fellow ballplayers have gotten through the years harmoniously and with respectable success - but things are shaken up when new ownership unexpectedly afflicts them. To their surprise, management will be overtaken by K.C. Higgins (Esther Williams), a good-looking brunette whose beauty is matched by wit. Naturally, both men fall for her, but it seems that Eddie, the more romantically experienced of the two, will prosper in courting her. And because relationships always reign equal in lighthearted musicals, Dennis, of course, gets to find happiness, too, just with Shirley (Betty Garrett), a kooky fan. But that's not all the action that plagues "Take Me Out to the Ball Game's" feathery storyline. Also fueling the intrigue is the gang's contending with a gaggle of gangsters scheming to rig a pivotal game for a bet. By the film's end, all will be solved. But while watching, we may as well pretend that it all isn't all predictability given a high budget and a stellar cast. Sardonicism, though, isn't something we're affected by very often during "Take Me Out to the Ball Game": it's such cheery entertainment that smirking at its rich sentimentality evades us. We want to see its characters prevail, and we also want to see them dance and sing, and yes, even play ball. And that's how it should be - optimism is a trait that is arguably required to be brought out of us during (and after) the viewing of a musical. That's how we know that "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is a good one.

    Since I'm too preoccupied with "Singin' in the Rain" to allow myself to readily allow for any Gene Kelly starring musical into my heart without a multitude of comparisons first, I found that I liked 1949's "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" a lot more when I forced myself to let my guard down. Because really, the two aren't so homogenous. Where "Singin' in the Rain" is a drivingly ambitious opera of musical satire, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is an easygoing studio project more willing to serve as a vehicle for its starry cast than it is to change cinema. And because it's directed by Busby Berkeley ("42nd Street," "The Gang's All Here"), a maestro of the genre, and because it is headlined not just by Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire but also by the Million Dollar Mermaid herself, Esther Williams, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is a pastime perhaps too pretty and too pleasureful to pass up, despite its shortcomings. It's a commonplace musical saved by its undemanding affability, a strength many formulaic musicals of the time managed to consistently unleash. I guess Technicolor and attractive leads can do that to you. Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra star as Eddie O'Brien and Dennis Ryan, a close-knit pair of baseball stars as serious about their careers as they are bent on someday more seriously pursuing a vaudeville act. Part of the Wolves, a fictional American League team, the men and their fellow ballplayers have gotten through the years harmoniously and with respectable success - but things are shaken up when new ownership unexpectedly afflicts them. To their surprise, management will be overtaken by K.C. Higgins (Esther Williams), a good-looking brunette whose beauty is matched by wit. Naturally, both men fall for her, but it seems that Eddie, the more romantically experienced of the two, will prosper in courting her. And because relationships always reign equal in lighthearted musicals, Dennis, of course, gets to find happiness, too, just with Shirley (Betty Garrett), a kooky fan. But that's not all the action that plagues "Take Me Out to the Ball Game's" feathery storyline. Also fueling the intrigue is the gang's contending with a gaggle of gangsters scheming to rig a pivotal game for a bet. By the film's end, all will be solved. But while watching, we may as well pretend that it all isn't all predictability given a high budget and a stellar cast. Sardonicism, though, isn't something we're affected by very often during "Take Me Out to the Ball Game": it's such cheery entertainment that smirking at its rich sentimentality evades us. We want to see its characters prevail, and we also want to see them dance and sing, and yes, even play ball. And that's how it should be - optimism is a trait that is arguably required to be brought out of us during (and after) the viewing of a musical. That's how we know that "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is a good one.

  • Jun 12, 2016

    Yikes! Hard to believe this passed as entertainment at one time. Dreadfully dated comedy, music and dance routines - as the song goes, one, two, three strikes yer out.

    Yikes! Hard to believe this passed as entertainment at one time. Dreadfully dated comedy, music and dance routines - as the song goes, one, two, three strikes yer out.

  • Mar 05, 2016

    Enjoyable minor Berkeley but the songs are fairly horrible

    Enjoyable minor Berkeley but the songs are fairly horrible