Tar Creek - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Tar Creek Reviews

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June 12, 2015
Added this to my playlist on Netflix because this is just next door. It is a well done documentary, but mostly it's terrifying. If you want to know why the Tar Creek and Picher mining area is still a deadly menace, watch this film. Why despite millions of tax dollars being spent, nothing has been done. Are you interested in why your children can't learn, or why you have cancer? Local folks should watch this. It's very thought provoking. I loved it and hatedit.
August 6, 2014
Good documentary about an atrocious environmental disaster in Oklahoma and it's long term affects on the local population. 3 stars
February 17, 2014
This is a pretty good documentary that starts off rather slow but picks up as people struggle to find a solution to their problems. And boy do they have problems: the situation in Picher, Oklahoma is all kinds of fucked up, to say the least. The problems are laid out one after the other: lead poisoning, contaminated soil, contaminated water, toxic chat piles, "subsidence" (really, sinkholes), unfair appraisals, and massive political corruption and cronyism. The cherry on top is that, as usual, Native Americans get the biggest shaft: the local Quapaw tribe is stuck with this ruined land and can't be bought out or moved.

It's just unbelievable how many layers of tragedy are piled up in this one place, and the movie does a great job of painting a sympathetic picture of these people's plight. The colloquial and conversational style of Matt Myers's narration helps the audience relate to how the people in the film are feeling.
February 17, 2014
This is a pretty good documentary that starts off rather slow but picks up as people struggle to find a solution to their problems. And boy do they have problems: the situation in Picher, Oklahoma is all kinds of fucked up, to say the least. The problems are laid out one after the other: lead poisoning, contaminated soil, contaminated water, toxic chat piles, "subsidence" (really, sinkholes), unfair appraisals, and massive political corruption and cronyism. The cherry on top is that, as usual, Native Americans get the biggest shaft: the local Quapaw tribe is stuck with this ruined land and can't be bought out or moved.

It's just unbelievable how many layers of tragedy are piled up in this one place, and the movie does a great job of painting a sympathetic picture of these people's plight. The colloquial and conversational style of Matt Myers's narration helps the audience relate to how the people in the film are feeling.
January 2, 2011
Excellent eye-opening documentary. Wonderful photography.
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