That Obscure Object of Desire Reviews

  • Nov 29, 2017

    All films by Bunuel is a pure craftsmanship, this one is not exception. His satires are so biting and subtle. This film in particular is about an old man's obsession with a young girl, often bordering with absurdity. It remains a mystery to me why the director used two actresses to play the role of Conchita, but it is an interesting move.

    All films by Bunuel is a pure craftsmanship, this one is not exception. His satires are so biting and subtle. This film in particular is about an old man's obsession with a young girl, often bordering with absurdity. It remains a mystery to me why the director used two actresses to play the role of Conchita, but it is an interesting move.

  • Apr 14, 2017

    Compelling but makes too blatant of a statement on sexuality.

    Compelling but makes too blatant of a statement on sexuality.

  • Feb 26, 2017

    My second favorite film of all time. Using two actresses as one female character is brilliant.

    My second favorite film of all time. Using two actresses as one female character is brilliant.

  • Apr 19, 2016

    If I was forced to pick a favourite filmmaker, I would have to pick Luis Buñuel. He saw people for the deeply flawed things we are, yet really kind of loved us for our absurd refusal to accept our weaknesses. His last film stars Fernando Rey as an urbane, dignified gentleman who falls hopelessly in love with Conchita, a young woman he meets working as his maid and who he actively pursues and couples with on and off throughout the film. She returns his affection, but refuses to let him conjugate their relationship. She alternates between hot and cold, promising to sleep with him and then withdrawing at the last moment, viciously rebuking him and then begging him to come back. This sounds like she is the villain of the piece, but it's never that simple with Buñuel. Her repeated statement that she loves him wholeheartedly, but is refusing him only this one small part of her has a certain absurd plausibility to it. When Maria Schneider walked off the film, Buñuel replaced her with two actresses. Conchita is alternately played by Carole Bouquet ("For Your Eyes Only") and Ángela Molina ("Live Flesh"). It's tempting to seek a pattern in this bold bit of weirdness, but really there's no deeper meaning to this move. It's a last bit of absurdist genius from a true master.

    If I was forced to pick a favourite filmmaker, I would have to pick Luis Buñuel. He saw people for the deeply flawed things we are, yet really kind of loved us for our absurd refusal to accept our weaknesses. His last film stars Fernando Rey as an urbane, dignified gentleman who falls hopelessly in love with Conchita, a young woman he meets working as his maid and who he actively pursues and couples with on and off throughout the film. She returns his affection, but refuses to let him conjugate their relationship. She alternates between hot and cold, promising to sleep with him and then withdrawing at the last moment, viciously rebuking him and then begging him to come back. This sounds like she is the villain of the piece, but it's never that simple with Buñuel. Her repeated statement that she loves him wholeheartedly, but is refusing him only this one small part of her has a certain absurd plausibility to it. When Maria Schneider walked off the film, Buñuel replaced her with two actresses. Conchita is alternately played by Carole Bouquet ("For Your Eyes Only") and Ángela Molina ("Live Flesh"). It's tempting to seek a pattern in this bold bit of weirdness, but really there's no deeper meaning to this move. It's a last bit of absurdist genius from a true master.

  • Jan 18, 2016

    http://filmreviewsnsuch.blogspot.com/2016/01/that-obscure-object-of-desire.html

    http://filmreviewsnsuch.blogspot.com/2016/01/that-obscure-object-of-desire.html

  • Jan 08, 2016

    I know, a master piece -- but I just found it weird, the terrorist acts hilarious, and the two main characters very disturbing -- which I am sure is what I was supposed to feel.

    I know, a master piece -- but I just found it weird, the terrorist acts hilarious, and the two main characters very disturbing -- which I am sure is what I was supposed to feel.

  • Oct 12, 2015

    Pure sexual torture. Buenel can't help himself. It's an odd dark comedy, and I can't particularly wrap my brain around it at the moment, but it includes two actresses playing the same woman, and successfully tricking us into thinking they were the same person. That takes extraordinary talent as a director. Buenel is a genius.

    Pure sexual torture. Buenel can't help himself. It's an odd dark comedy, and I can't particularly wrap my brain around it at the moment, but it includes two actresses playing the same woman, and successfully tricking us into thinking they were the same person. That takes extraordinary talent as a director. Buenel is a genius.

  • Aug 13, 2015

    F 8.2 [Luis Buñuel]

    F 8.2 [Luis Buñuel]

  • Jun 27, 2015

    As far as surrealist - or surrealist-oriented - cinema is concerned, every director has his brand of surrealism. Guy Maddin tackles on notions of memory, Lynch obtains the surreal by subtraction and so forth. Bunuel's surrealism("Un chien andalou" was joint work) is like a chameleon: it blends so well with what we are familiar with, that it is barely noticeable. Sometimes, this doesn't work, like in the case of "Belle de Jour", for example. There, we were left with a rather simple mechanism, to replace characters and story worth investing time in. "That Obscure Object of Desire" is on the opposite pole, fortunately. It offers captivating characters and a story that is intriguing(even if you kinda know where it leads). The now famous switch works perfectly as the chameleon I was talking about earlier. On one hand, there is no way you can;t notice, on the other hand, the characters and the plot evolution draw your attention deeper. In another note, the film has this "salsa" feel to it and a penchant for those embarrassing intimate episodes(which are described in a highly accurate fashion). On a visual level, the film is deliberately unremarkable and, again, in this particular context, it works. For what the film wants to achieve, a natural approach was mandatory. The performances are uniformly great and the closing credits accurate and, maybe, the only thing I haven't really liked about the film, was the fact that some of the scenes containing the aforementioned "embarrassing moments", dragged in for too long, but this isn't a big deal. Overall, I give this 4.5/5.

    As far as surrealist - or surrealist-oriented - cinema is concerned, every director has his brand of surrealism. Guy Maddin tackles on notions of memory, Lynch obtains the surreal by subtraction and so forth. Bunuel's surrealism("Un chien andalou" was joint work) is like a chameleon: it blends so well with what we are familiar with, that it is barely noticeable. Sometimes, this doesn't work, like in the case of "Belle de Jour", for example. There, we were left with a rather simple mechanism, to replace characters and story worth investing time in. "That Obscure Object of Desire" is on the opposite pole, fortunately. It offers captivating characters and a story that is intriguing(even if you kinda know where it leads). The now famous switch works perfectly as the chameleon I was talking about earlier. On one hand, there is no way you can;t notice, on the other hand, the characters and the plot evolution draw your attention deeper. In another note, the film has this "salsa" feel to it and a penchant for those embarrassing intimate episodes(which are described in a highly accurate fashion). On a visual level, the film is deliberately unremarkable and, again, in this particular context, it works. For what the film wants to achieve, a natural approach was mandatory. The performances are uniformly great and the closing credits accurate and, maybe, the only thing I haven't really liked about the film, was the fact that some of the scenes containing the aforementioned "embarrassing moments", dragged in for too long, but this isn't a big deal. Overall, I give this 4.5/5.

  • Feb 28, 2015

    Trawls the multifarious nature of love, lust and passion. This tightly-poised, exotic picture is a genius, libidinal fire-house. 9/10.

    Trawls the multifarious nature of love, lust and passion. This tightly-poised, exotic picture is a genius, libidinal fire-house. 9/10.