The Botany of Desire - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Botany of Desire Reviews

Page 2 of 3
September 22, 2010
Watch this now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry for the shitty review.
September 8, 2010
Wow Wow Wow. A terrific documentary with a whole new school of thought. Plants (specifically apples, tulips, marijuana and potatoes) manipulating human beings and the symbiotic relationship that we share. Very knowledgeable experts and professionals speaking about this amazing theory. Some of them are a little TOO into their plants, but you know you're getting your information from people that love plants and take them very seriously.
August 25, 2010
It was best documentary on plants of apple, potato, tulip, and marijuana, that I have ever watch on PBS. Who knew potatos came from Peru. Apples came from middle Asia and marijuana helps you forget bad memories.
Super Reviewer
August 24, 2010
A fascinating look at how plants and humans have interacted, down through the ages, benefiting both. Michael Pollan's premise is that by satisfying a human need, or desire, each of these four plant species managed to expand their territory. Man's desires caused him to transplant these plants from their native environments to virtually everywhere in the world. It is an interesting premise and one which the filmmakers have adequately presented in a most believable package. This marries the best entertainment techniques with some very interesting educational material and becomes something that both informs and entertains. This viewer learned a lot and the two hours just flew by. One finds that Mr Pollan's enthusiasm for his subject is contagious. He never sounds like a dry pedantic, disgorging his superior expert knowledge, but more like an excited explorer, discovering new lands and making new connections with the natural world.
½ August 15, 2010
A beautifully produced and enjoyable look at our relationship with plants. It gave some very interesting insights to how we've both worked with plants for our mutual benefit, spreading the deliciousness of apples and the beauty of tulips throughout the world; and it gave some warnings of how we've fought against the resiliency and adaptivity of plants, forcibly growing only one type of potato, which requires the heavy use of pesticides to keep away ever-adapting pests.

Stop eating at McDonald's (which only buys one type of particularly long potato for its french fries) now, please.
½ August 15, 2010
A beautifully produced and enjoyable look at our relationship with plants. It gave some very interesting insights to how we've both worked with plants for our mutual benefit, spreading the deliciousness of apples and the beauty of tulips throughout the world; and it gave some warnings of how we've fought against the resiliency and adaptivity of plants, forcibly growing only one type of potato, which requires the heavy use of pesticides to keep away ever-adapting pests.

Stop eating at McDonald's (which only buys one type of particularly long potato for its french fries) now, please.
August 9, 2010
PBS Special which is Special indeed. You'll never see Apple, Tulip, Marijuana, and Potato the same way again. Recommended to anyone who ever eat. :-)
August 9, 2010
This explains the terminology I hear surrounding current food and plant issues in a historical vs modern perspective. I've heard mono culture before, but until I watched this didn't understand its meaning or impact. Aside from its educational aspects, this film shares a perspective about botany that few other venues could. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys documentaries.
July 9, 2010
Michael Pollan has some really interesting theories about plants. A worthwhile view on Netflix's instant list.
½ June 29, 2010
Includes a whole chapter on a banned weed that sounds like my name.
June 24, 2010
Fascinating and engaging. This film provokes a lot of thought about human relationship to plants. Also has a lot of amusing factoids.
June 7, 2010
This is such an interesting documentary! I am SO IN LOVE with the APPLE<3
May 26, 2010
Very eye opening. For instance in an apple each seed will lead to a different type of apple. We limit the natural evolution be only planting 5 or so species of apples. This makes it venable so we have to rely on pesticides. You will learn and gain a new perspective of plants.
½ April 22, 2010
... and then, after a very pleasant and rather informative and typically structured PBS documentary, came Monsanto into the picture in the potato segment and that just spoiled it for me, the potato segment, at least...
April 18, 2010
Beautiful documentary by Michael Pollan about the apple, the tulip, cannabis and the potato. The film is based on Pollan's book of the same title. Really enjoyable and educational.
March 21, 2010
plants really are amazing and it saddens me how far removed we are as a society from the actual production of what we consume
Super Reviewer
½ February 24, 2010
Lopsided and a bit misdirected, but overall entertaining and informative. The Botany of Desire is obviously trying to entice people into watching a film about something that sends most people to sleep: agriculture and botany. Not a sexy subject in the least, it tries its best (most obviously, in its title) to make its subject appealing to a mass audience. As such, it gets a bit anthro-centric and pop-culturey... complete with gimmicky title cards and simplified narrative structures.
Underneath all the polish though, is an informative and well-thought piece of educational film, notably the beautifully neutral section on Marijuana and the riveting socio-economic history of the Tulip. The genetic-food focus of the Potato, and the somewhat mythologized history of the Apple, the bookends of the film, fall short. Overall, it succeeds as education but looks a bit ridiculous as it tries to pantomime entertainment.
½ February 21, 2010
*excellent* documentary about how plants have evolved to "convince" humans to ensure their survival. Goes in depth on the origins of the popularity of the apple, the tulip, cannabis, and the potato
Page 2 of 3