Reviews

  • Dec 03, 2018

    Director Shohei Imamura personal project film involving an uninhabited somewhat tropical island and it's prehistoric islanders come to fruition once an engineer (Kazuo Kitamura) from Tokyo city attempts to make plans regarding the island as a whole, and transitioning it into a sugar cane factory. Meeting first is the eldest,Yamamori, (Kanjûrô Arashi), appointed as the engineer's protege, is the son, Kametaro (Chôichirô Kawarasaki), appointed priestess of Noro Uma Futori (Yasuko Matsui), an sexually repressed inbred, Turiko (Hideko Okiyama) and the oldest always chained son, Nekichi (Rentarô Mikuni) violated many superstitious rules regarding the islands customs and traditions.

    Director Shohei Imamura personal project film involving an uninhabited somewhat tropical island and it's prehistoric islanders come to fruition once an engineer (Kazuo Kitamura) from Tokyo city attempts to make plans regarding the island as a whole, and transitioning it into a sugar cane factory. Meeting first is the eldest,Yamamori, (Kanjûrô Arashi), appointed as the engineer's protege, is the son, Kametaro (Chôichirô Kawarasaki), appointed priestess of Noro Uma Futori (Yasuko Matsui), an sexually repressed inbred, Turiko (Hideko Okiyama) and the oldest always chained son, Nekichi (Rentarô Mikuni) violated many superstitious rules regarding the islands customs and traditions.

  • May 13, 2013

    Profound Desire of the Gods takes its time reaching its final point, but when it does, you realize it was classic Imamura all along: funny, provocative, disturbing and true. B+/A-

    Profound Desire of the Gods takes its time reaching its final point, but when it does, you realize it was classic Imamura all along: funny, provocative, disturbing and true. B+/A-

  • Mar 03, 2013

    astounding in every way. a sprawling, epic, poetic, shocking and always riveting work of the highest cinematic art

    astounding in every way. a sprawling, epic, poetic, shocking and always riveting work of the highest cinematic art

  • Feb 01, 2012

    Is incest the Profound Desire of the Gods? It seems that way, as that, eh, trend does seem to cross many gods of different cultures. So if it's good enough for the Gods, why not humans? And if inbreeding is kind of a bad thing that causes many issues, does that mean that the ancient gods were all crazy inbred hillbillies? It would explain much.

    Is incest the Profound Desire of the Gods? It seems that way, as that, eh, trend does seem to cross many gods of different cultures. So if it's good enough for the Gods, why not humans? And if inbreeding is kind of a bad thing that causes many issues, does that mean that the ancient gods were all crazy inbred hillbillies? It would explain much.

  • scott g Super Reviewer
    Dec 11, 2011

    It could be a lot shorter but neverless its still a interesting story with lots to enjoy,some fasinating performances on show keep it ticking along, and the story itself about a family with issues inside the family and to others on the island comes off well.

    It could be a lot shorter but neverless its still a interesting story with lots to enjoy,some fasinating performances on show keep it ticking along, and the story itself about a family with issues inside the family and to others on the island comes off well.

  • Jul 08, 2011

    Jäklar vilken överraskning, vilken originell och galet bra film! Går bara inte att ge en kortfattad beskrivning på så jag säger bara SE DEN! Särskilt om du är intresserad av naturreligioner, primitivism och alternativa sätt att leva. En av de klart bästa japanska filmerna jag sett på senare år, trots en spellängd på tre timmar är det inte en död minut. Finns på jättefin DVD/blu-ray från bolaget Masters of Cinema.

    Jäklar vilken överraskning, vilken originell och galet bra film! Går bara inte att ge en kortfattad beskrivning på så jag säger bara SE DEN! Särskilt om du är intresserad av naturreligioner, primitivism och alternativa sätt att leva. En av de klart bästa japanska filmerna jag sett på senare år, trots en spellängd på tre timmar är det inte en död minut. Finns på jättefin DVD/blu-ray från bolaget Masters of Cinema.

  • Apr 14, 2011

    Amazing! I can't get this one out of my head.

    Amazing! I can't get this one out of my head.

  • Mar 26, 2011

    Progress and civilization has a bittersweet flavor in the end of this movie. Modernity and tradition, the eternal struggle; legends and Coca Cola, all in the same.

    Progress and civilization has a bittersweet flavor in the end of this movie. Modernity and tradition, the eternal struggle; legends and Coca Cola, all in the same.

  • Oct 05, 2010

    A little known Japanese movie that wasn’t well received at the time of it’s release but has since become quite a legendary movie. The story is set on the fictional island of Kurage, a subtropical world whose inhabitants are engaged in a desperate struggle for survival, caught between faith in their traditional gods and the promises of modernity. Central to this drama are the Futori, the oldest and most primitive family on Kurage, with incestuous habits that have led to them being blamed for the drought strangling the island. They are digging a pit to appease the gods when an engineer arrives from Tokyo. His job is to build a well to get fresh water for a new sugar cane factory, but he is thwarted by the environment and the islanders’ superstitions. He soon falls for the Futori daughter, Toriko, a sex-crazed half-wit, and briefly reverts to his animalistic true self before, inevitably, civilisation and capitalism win him back, and the island opens up to the forces of progress. This is one long movie – coming up close to 3 hours long so watching this may be a drag to a lot of people. I did get a sense that at times I was watching a Japanese version of The Wicker Man. The movie is filled with unique and delightful shots and also punctuated by close ups of wild animals and birds, also some macro shots of various insects – it all looks rather wonderful and beautiful but a bit distracting from the storyline itself. Profound Desires of the Gods is a complex film, and if you can sit through filmmaking that focuses more on character study than all out action, you might find a lot to like here. Everybody else though, I would not recommend sitting through this wishing to like it since the viewer is at the mercy the director’s cinematic judgment. I quite liked it though.

    A little known Japanese movie that wasn’t well received at the time of it’s release but has since become quite a legendary movie. The story is set on the fictional island of Kurage, a subtropical world whose inhabitants are engaged in a desperate struggle for survival, caught between faith in their traditional gods and the promises of modernity. Central to this drama are the Futori, the oldest and most primitive family on Kurage, with incestuous habits that have led to them being blamed for the drought strangling the island. They are digging a pit to appease the gods when an engineer arrives from Tokyo. His job is to build a well to get fresh water for a new sugar cane factory, but he is thwarted by the environment and the islanders’ superstitions. He soon falls for the Futori daughter, Toriko, a sex-crazed half-wit, and briefly reverts to his animalistic true self before, inevitably, civilisation and capitalism win him back, and the island opens up to the forces of progress. This is one long movie – coming up close to 3 hours long so watching this may be a drag to a lot of people. I did get a sense that at times I was watching a Japanese version of The Wicker Man. The movie is filled with unique and delightful shots and also punctuated by close ups of wild animals and birds, also some macro shots of various insects – it all looks rather wonderful and beautiful but a bit distracting from the storyline itself. Profound Desires of the Gods is a complex film, and if you can sit through filmmaking that focuses more on character study than all out action, you might find a lot to like here. Everybody else though, I would not recommend sitting through this wishing to like it since the viewer is at the mercy the director’s cinematic judgment. I quite liked it though.

  • Oct 05, 2010

    A little known Japanese movie that wasnâ(TM)t well received at the time of itâ(TM)s release but has since become quite a legendary movie. The story is set on the fictional island of Kurage, a subtropical world whose inhabitants are engaged in a desperate struggle for survival, caught between faith in their traditional gods and the promises of modernity. Central to this drama are the Futori, the oldest and most primitive family on Kurage, with incestuous habits that have led to them being blamed for the drought strangling the island. They are digging a pit to appease the gods when an engineer arrives from Tokyo. His job is to build a well to get fresh water for a new sugar cane factory, but he is thwarted by the environment and the islandersâ(TM) superstitions. He soon falls for the Futori daughter, Toriko, a sex-crazed half-wit, and briefly reverts to his animalistic true self before, inevitably, civilisation and capitalism win him back, and the island opens up to the forces of progress. This is one long movie â" coming up close to 3 hours long so watching this may be a drag to a lot of people. I did get a sense that at times I was watching a Japanese version of The Wicker Man. The movie is filled with unique and delightful shots and also punctuated by close ups of wild animals and birds, also some macro shots of various insects â" it all looks rather wonderful and beautiful but a bit distracting from the storyline itself. Profound Desires of the Gods is a complex film, and if you can sit through filmmaking that focuses more on character study than all out action, you might find a lot to like here. Everybody else though, I would not recommend sitting through this wishing to like it since the viewer is at the mercy the directorâ(TM)s cinematic judgment. I quite liked it though.

    A little known Japanese movie that wasnâ(TM)t well received at the time of itâ(TM)s release but has since become quite a legendary movie. The story is set on the fictional island of Kurage, a subtropical world whose inhabitants are engaged in a desperate struggle for survival, caught between faith in their traditional gods and the promises of modernity. Central to this drama are the Futori, the oldest and most primitive family on Kurage, with incestuous habits that have led to them being blamed for the drought strangling the island. They are digging a pit to appease the gods when an engineer arrives from Tokyo. His job is to build a well to get fresh water for a new sugar cane factory, but he is thwarted by the environment and the islandersâ(TM) superstitions. He soon falls for the Futori daughter, Toriko, a sex-crazed half-wit, and briefly reverts to his animalistic true self before, inevitably, civilisation and capitalism win him back, and the island opens up to the forces of progress. This is one long movie â" coming up close to 3 hours long so watching this may be a drag to a lot of people. I did get a sense that at times I was watching a Japanese version of The Wicker Man. The movie is filled with unique and delightful shots and also punctuated by close ups of wild animals and birds, also some macro shots of various insects â" it all looks rather wonderful and beautiful but a bit distracting from the storyline itself. Profound Desires of the Gods is a complex film, and if you can sit through filmmaking that focuses more on character study than all out action, you might find a lot to like here. Everybody else though, I would not recommend sitting through this wishing to like it since the viewer is at the mercy the directorâ(TM)s cinematic judgment. I quite liked it though.