The Terence Davies Trilogy (1984) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Terence Davies Trilogy (1984)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

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Movie Info

In this downbeat trilogy on the life and times of a man who had every reason to be depressed, director Terrence Davies has delivered a fascinating but decidely miserable 94 minutes. The first segment relates little Robert Tucker's days walled up in a tough, unsentimental boys' school, or at home with parents who are alternately violent or callous, and have no discernible redeeming qualities. When his father dies, Robert is still wracked by grief - perhaps the loss of the hope of love was too final to bear. In the next vignette, Robert has a nowhere job in a foreboding office environment. He still lives at home with his mother, and faces his own personal and emotional issues in silence. In the final segments, flashbacks and flash forwards show Tucker remembering his childhood and life, as an old man in a sterile hospital. With a hard-hitting emotional punch, this trilogy is effective cinema - but many viewers surely would have preferred some color to balance the unremitting gray tones of the story. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Drama
Directed By:
In Theaters:
 wide
Runtime:

Cast

Wilfrid Brambell
as Robert Tucker(old age)
Sheila Raynor
as Robert's mother

Critic Reviews for The Terence Davies Trilogy

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Audience Reviews for The Terence Davies Trilogy

Three extraordinary tales charting the life of a homosexual man. The first segment is "Children". We are introduced to Robert Tucker at his school, which for him is a violent enviroment. We find out his home life is not much better. In the second segment, "Madonna and Child", Robert is now a middle aged man. Still living with his now elderly mother and working in an office he has to deal with his longing for love. The final segment, "Death and Transfiguration", sees Robert as an elderly man on his deathbed reflecting his life. The Terence Davies Trilogy is very bleak and depressing, not only due to the subject matter but the B&W photography and the Liverpool surroundings. Yet despite it is an unsung British classic.

Emily B.
Emily B.

Super Reviewer

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