The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open Reviews

  • 16h ago

    The The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open, is just pure trauma porn. Worse, it is exploitative of women it claims to want us to have empathy for. Rosie stays in the camera's gaze, with no agency and no escape from the gaze. This is not done ironically. This is done for the self aggrandizement of the filmmakers. This is white feminist guilt masquerading behind an Indigenous face - and feeling good about itself, because after all, Rosie goes back to the abusive boyfriend because she wasn't quite ready for her liberation. Please look closer and not be guilt ridden yourself. If this film was made by only a white person - and not co-directed with an Indigenous woman - would the reviews be so generous? Women who have really lived in the margins and on the street find this film lacking in authenticity and as about as sincere as a plastic trinket.

    The The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open, is just pure trauma porn. Worse, it is exploitative of women it claims to want us to have empathy for. Rosie stays in the camera's gaze, with no agency and no escape from the gaze. This is not done ironically. This is done for the self aggrandizement of the filmmakers. This is white feminist guilt masquerading behind an Indigenous face - and feeling good about itself, because after all, Rosie goes back to the abusive boyfriend because she wasn't quite ready for her liberation. Please look closer and not be guilt ridden yourself. If this film was made by only a white person - and not co-directed with an Indigenous woman - would the reviews be so generous? Women who have really lived in the margins and on the street find this film lacking in authenticity and as about as sincere as a plastic trinket.

  • 6d ago

    SHAKY CAM ALERT!! Ok, I've made it clear I can't stand shaky cam. Frankly, it's lazy filmmaking. It's a gimmick and it can work, but most of the time it just makes the viewer seasick. There's a worthwhile story here, but it's overwhelmed by decisions that didn't work for me. Filmed predominately in one long take, the picture has a realness. There's an everyday quality to the characters. After about 15 minutes I needed a break because I had a headache. I wanted to give this film the full attention it deserved. When I returned the next day I was impressed with the delicate performances of the two leads Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers and Violet Nelson. It was not only Nelson's first feature film, it was her first acting credit period. Tailfeathers also co-wrote and directed with Kathleen Hepburn. Interestingly, when the camera becomes more steady the film starts to congeal. The movie feels like it could be a documentary. It's a Canadian feature, but it's about a pair of indigenous woman who meet by chance. There just aren't enough films like this being made. Our natives have great stories and they should be hear just like anyone else. Often our indigenous are the forgotten minority. What's worse than shaky cam? Shakey cam in a car! Holy Crap! I want to like this, but watch it on the biggest screen you have or be prepared to be annoyed. Behind it all there is a compelling story that needs to be told, but there are many distractions. I would have loved this film to be a little less gimmicky. Your milage will vary depending on whether or not you like the gimmicks. Final Score: 6.3/10

    SHAKY CAM ALERT!! Ok, I've made it clear I can't stand shaky cam. Frankly, it's lazy filmmaking. It's a gimmick and it can work, but most of the time it just makes the viewer seasick. There's a worthwhile story here, but it's overwhelmed by decisions that didn't work for me. Filmed predominately in one long take, the picture has a realness. There's an everyday quality to the characters. After about 15 minutes I needed a break because I had a headache. I wanted to give this film the full attention it deserved. When I returned the next day I was impressed with the delicate performances of the two leads Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers and Violet Nelson. It was not only Nelson's first feature film, it was her first acting credit period. Tailfeathers also co-wrote and directed with Kathleen Hepburn. Interestingly, when the camera becomes more steady the film starts to congeal. The movie feels like it could be a documentary. It's a Canadian feature, but it's about a pair of indigenous woman who meet by chance. There just aren't enough films like this being made. Our natives have great stories and they should be hear just like anyone else. Often our indigenous are the forgotten minority. What's worse than shaky cam? Shakey cam in a car! Holy Crap! I want to like this, but watch it on the biggest screen you have or be prepared to be annoyed. Behind it all there is a compelling story that needs to be told, but there are many distractions. I would have loved this film to be a little less gimmicky. Your milage will vary depending on whether or not you like the gimmicks. Final Score: 6.3/10

  • Dec 30, 2019

    Wow. How lonnnnnnng without a cut? Flawlessly natural and utterly, heartbreakingly believable. Astonishing that one of its stars, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, was also the film's co-director, co-writer, and a producer. Aila runs into Rosie by chance, out on the street, crying in the rain, barefoot, bruised, bleeding, and pendant, with a man yelling at her from across the intersection. Rosie is put-upon yet still plays with the expectations others (both characters in the film, and those in the audience) would put upon her, a victim who refuses to be entirely victimized. TBRWTWBO is both a lesson in underestimating native women, and a reinforcement of the terribly complicated situation they find themselves in in today's society. Rather brilliant.

    Wow. How lonnnnnnng without a cut? Flawlessly natural and utterly, heartbreakingly believable. Astonishing that one of its stars, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, was also the film's co-director, co-writer, and a producer. Aila runs into Rosie by chance, out on the street, crying in the rain, barefoot, bruised, bleeding, and pendant, with a man yelling at her from across the intersection. Rosie is put-upon yet still plays with the expectations others (both characters in the film, and those in the audience) would put upon her, a victim who refuses to be entirely victimized. TBRWTWBO is both a lesson in underestimating native women, and a reinforcement of the terribly complicated situation they find themselves in in today's society. Rather brilliant.

  • Dec 28, 2019

    Stupid movie , not even worth watching it... pointless

    Stupid movie , not even worth watching it... pointless

  • Dec 13, 2019

    excellent movie - very thought provoking portrayal of two women, (the effects of domestic) abuse and human emotion - worth seeing for sure... it leaves you thinking about human nature, victimization, class, and culture

    excellent movie - very thought provoking portrayal of two women, (the effects of domestic) abuse and human emotion - worth seeing for sure... it leaves you thinking about human nature, victimization, class, and culture

  • Dec 07, 2019

    Filmed in the downtown east side of Vancouver. We watched it on Netflix the other night and it was really well done and we enjoyed the story line.

    Filmed in the downtown east side of Vancouver. We watched it on Netflix the other night and it was really well done and we enjoyed the story line.

  • Dec 01, 2019

    This movie broke me. This should be required viewing for anyone who wants to understand the POV of a victim of domestic abuse. The performances were the best I've seen in a long, long, time. Please go watch this, it deserves your time. To the other 2 reviews, you ask what was the point? What was the point? The point is that this happens every day and we aren't doing enough to take care of the people who have been wronged so horrifically. That was the point when Rosie failed to do the correct thing. That is the world we LIVE IN RIGHT NOW. You wanted this movie to be some fairy tale of a survivor having everything perfectly work out in the end? No, because that doesn't happen. Because we as a society have FAILED these survivors. Even as we become more supportive and open with movements like MeToo, there are so many people who are pushing against it. Why? Why would you ever push against holding monsters accountable? Because a lot of people see themselves in those monsters and they feel like they are attacked. We can't support those people anymore and we have to do it through media like this. We have to be open. Thats why this movie matters, why it was made. Its fucking powerful.

    This movie broke me. This should be required viewing for anyone who wants to understand the POV of a victim of domestic abuse. The performances were the best I've seen in a long, long, time. Please go watch this, it deserves your time. To the other 2 reviews, you ask what was the point? What was the point? The point is that this happens every day and we aren't doing enough to take care of the people who have been wronged so horrifically. That was the point when Rosie failed to do the correct thing. That is the world we LIVE IN RIGHT NOW. You wanted this movie to be some fairy tale of a survivor having everything perfectly work out in the end? No, because that doesn't happen. Because we as a society have FAILED these survivors. Even as we become more supportive and open with movements like MeToo, there are so many people who are pushing against it. Why? Why would you ever push against holding monsters accountable? Because a lot of people see themselves in those monsters and they feel like they are attacked. We can't support those people anymore and we have to do it through media like this. We have to be open. Thats why this movie matters, why it was made. Its fucking powerful.

  • Dec 01, 2019

    And the point to that film was?

    And the point to that film was?

  • Nov 30, 2019

    I thought this was a touching and well made film. My disagreement with it is personal. (Spoilers ahead). As a survivor of domestic violence I was insulted and angered by this film. When a woman is bruised and bleeding and being screamed at on the street by the man who just assaulted her- CALL THE POLICE. Do not ask her if she wants you to call the police. YOU CALL THEM. A traumatized woman is in no condition to make a "choice". At this point in her dehumanization, she has no real choice. Aila was not "respecting" Rosie by saying "You decide." This was an abdication of her responsibility as a fellow human being. Had Aila taken responsibility and called the police, Rosie's abuser would have been arrested and imprisoned (because he was out on bail) and Rosie would have been safe. But Aila failed Rosie and Rosie's unborn child by taking her right back to a potentially fatal situation. Rosie needed and deserved a champion, and all she got was a whiney middle class woman who was motivated more from guilt than compassion. This is why we need more strong working class voices in media.

    I thought this was a touching and well made film. My disagreement with it is personal. (Spoilers ahead). As a survivor of domestic violence I was insulted and angered by this film. When a woman is bruised and bleeding and being screamed at on the street by the man who just assaulted her- CALL THE POLICE. Do not ask her if she wants you to call the police. YOU CALL THEM. A traumatized woman is in no condition to make a "choice". At this point in her dehumanization, she has no real choice. Aila was not "respecting" Rosie by saying "You decide." This was an abdication of her responsibility as a fellow human being. Had Aila taken responsibility and called the police, Rosie's abuser would have been arrested and imprisoned (because he was out on bail) and Rosie would have been safe. But Aila failed Rosie and Rosie's unborn child by taking her right back to a potentially fatal situation. Rosie needed and deserved a champion, and all she got was a whiney middle class woman who was motivated more from guilt than compassion. This is why we need more strong working class voices in media.