The Clockwork Girl Reviews

  • Jun 16, 2014

    Monday, June 16, 2014 (2010) The Clockwork Girl COMPUTER ANIMATION/ SCIENCE-FICTION Based on the comic book series created by Sean O'Reilly and Kevin Hanna, containing a very simplistic set up, surrounded with many complicated nuances young children would be incapable to understand unless you had 1) seen many movies, and 2) open to strange unusual things even though they're not so nice to look at. The movie is called "The Clockwork Girl" but upon watching it, it's almost looks just as complicated as watching any adult Japan animation movie since the entire environment is totally different than what viewers are accustomed into seeing. At the opening, the movie introduces us to two characters competing for the coveted prize of bragging rights. One's an expert biologist who happened to install two hearts into a Frankenstein -like baby who looks like a demon, and was using it to win since it had astronomical physical abilities, while his opponent is a mechanical person who builds things by using machines. He was using a mechanical robot that he had built for the contest until it was unable to do specific things. So because it lost him the contest, he let the "Ancients" take the robot away since it disappointed him. But what he did get instead is a relationship with one of the 3 judges and then he was happy again. A strange deadly plague were to happen later called "Blight" which eventually divided the city into two different groups since on one side, they wanted to be healed or fixed up by using biology and they were called "Biotists", while the other side wanted to be fixed up by using machines- they're called "Technocrats". And then by the time the plague took away his only love interest, he then became motivated to build another robot again, but this time one with a heart and much advanced abilities naming it 'Tesla' or "The Clockwork Girl", who's other purpose was to act as his daughter since he was alone and needed companionship. "The Clockwork Girl" and the demon baby viewers saw earlier are eventually going to meet since he's no longer a baby anymore who grew up to be a teenager named Huxley. Anyways, this entire set up almost seemed like it came from a L. Ron Hubbard novel, the founder of "Scientology" except that he was originally known as a novelist who writes science-fiction. Other homages I had noticed also includes "A Clockwork Orange", "The Phantom Menace" and "Star Trek" since the movie's approach into solving the "blight" plague almost looked like one. The only downfall is that is that it's too complicated for children to understand unless they understand biology and machines including viewers who're opened to other possible unexplainable possibilities but are possible to be shown on this movie. 3 out of 4 stars

    Monday, June 16, 2014 (2010) The Clockwork Girl COMPUTER ANIMATION/ SCIENCE-FICTION Based on the comic book series created by Sean O'Reilly and Kevin Hanna, containing a very simplistic set up, surrounded with many complicated nuances young children would be incapable to understand unless you had 1) seen many movies, and 2) open to strange unusual things even though they're not so nice to look at. The movie is called "The Clockwork Girl" but upon watching it, it's almost looks just as complicated as watching any adult Japan animation movie since the entire environment is totally different than what viewers are accustomed into seeing. At the opening, the movie introduces us to two characters competing for the coveted prize of bragging rights. One's an expert biologist who happened to install two hearts into a Frankenstein -like baby who looks like a demon, and was using it to win since it had astronomical physical abilities, while his opponent is a mechanical person who builds things by using machines. He was using a mechanical robot that he had built for the contest until it was unable to do specific things. So because it lost him the contest, he let the "Ancients" take the robot away since it disappointed him. But what he did get instead is a relationship with one of the 3 judges and then he was happy again. A strange deadly plague were to happen later called "Blight" which eventually divided the city into two different groups since on one side, they wanted to be healed or fixed up by using biology and they were called "Biotists", while the other side wanted to be fixed up by using machines- they're called "Technocrats". And then by the time the plague took away his only love interest, he then became motivated to build another robot again, but this time one with a heart and much advanced abilities naming it 'Tesla' or "The Clockwork Girl", who's other purpose was to act as his daughter since he was alone and needed companionship. "The Clockwork Girl" and the demon baby viewers saw earlier are eventually going to meet since he's no longer a baby anymore who grew up to be a teenager named Huxley. Anyways, this entire set up almost seemed like it came from a L. Ron Hubbard novel, the founder of "Scientology" except that he was originally known as a novelist who writes science-fiction. Other homages I had noticed also includes "A Clockwork Orange", "The Phantom Menace" and "Star Trek" since the movie's approach into solving the "blight" plague almost looked like one. The only downfall is that is that it's too complicated for children to understand unless they understand biology and machines including viewers who're opened to other possible unexplainable possibilities but are possible to be shown on this movie. 3 out of 4 stars