The Cut Reviews

  • Apr 22, 2017

    Very emotional movie!

    Very emotional movie!

  • Oct 02, 2016

    Amazing scenery, acting, and portrayal of a major humanitarian crisis and genocide. The difference between the beginning and the end could not have been more stark.

    Amazing scenery, acting, and portrayal of a major humanitarian crisis and genocide. The difference between the beginning and the end could not have been more stark.

  • Apr 03, 2016

    The Cut stars Tahar Rahim as an Armenian man who is taken away from his family by the Turkish military during World War I. This movie is a heart pounding and brutal piece of historical fiction set at the dawn of the Armenian genocide, and is not something to be taken lightly. It's the tale of an atrocity that is extremely relevant today due to its depiction of corrupt militaries, clashing of the Christian and Muslim religions, and refugees trying to escape from bloody conflict. Tahar's character, Nazaret, is forced into slave labor by the Turkish government as the war rages across the continent. Once his crew of slaves complete their task they are sentenced to be executed, but Nazaret's executioner takes pity on him and merely ruptures the side of his throat rather than slicing it. However, this injury causes Nazaret to be a mute for the rest of the film, forcing him to bear witness to some of the worst humanity has to offer without having a word to retort. The Cut manages to shock and grab its audience all the way through... for the first half of the film. The second half almost feels like director Fatih Akin didn't quite know what direction to take it in. Once the genocide is over, and the Turks leave, Nazaret sets out on a quest to find his twin daughters who have lived in a variety of spots around the world since their father was taken from them. What follows is a somewhat out of place globetrotting adventure that takes our hero to places like Cuba and even Minneapolis. This change of pace isn't helped by the fact that the film is awkwardly edited with abrupt cuts to some moments and uncomfortably sharp changes in tone from scene to scene. However, because of the variety of locations, the landscapes manage to steal the show. With the exception of one scene that had obvious green screen, the whole film looks beautiful, showing lush contrasts between Earth's different continents. Overall, a flawed film but certainly one that is extremely relevant, gorgeous, and shocking throughout.

    The Cut stars Tahar Rahim as an Armenian man who is taken away from his family by the Turkish military during World War I. This movie is a heart pounding and brutal piece of historical fiction set at the dawn of the Armenian genocide, and is not something to be taken lightly. It's the tale of an atrocity that is extremely relevant today due to its depiction of corrupt militaries, clashing of the Christian and Muslim religions, and refugees trying to escape from bloody conflict. Tahar's character, Nazaret, is forced into slave labor by the Turkish government as the war rages across the continent. Once his crew of slaves complete their task they are sentenced to be executed, but Nazaret's executioner takes pity on him and merely ruptures the side of his throat rather than slicing it. However, this injury causes Nazaret to be a mute for the rest of the film, forcing him to bear witness to some of the worst humanity has to offer without having a word to retort. The Cut manages to shock and grab its audience all the way through... for the first half of the film. The second half almost feels like director Fatih Akin didn't quite know what direction to take it in. Once the genocide is over, and the Turks leave, Nazaret sets out on a quest to find his twin daughters who have lived in a variety of spots around the world since their father was taken from them. What follows is a somewhat out of place globetrotting adventure that takes our hero to places like Cuba and even Minneapolis. This change of pace isn't helped by the fact that the film is awkwardly edited with abrupt cuts to some moments and uncomfortably sharp changes in tone from scene to scene. However, because of the variety of locations, the landscapes manage to steal the show. With the exception of one scene that had obvious green screen, the whole film looks beautiful, showing lush contrasts between Earth's different continents. Overall, a flawed film but certainly one that is extremely relevant, gorgeous, and shocking throughout.

  • Jan 25, 2016

    A sprawling Armenian drama.

    A sprawling Armenian drama.

  • Sep 18, 2015

    The Cut is beautifully designed and shot, whether it is in the desert, on the Atlantic Oceans or in the American plains. Its title may be a metaphorical representation of the hero's separation from his family, his journey to a foreign land, or his breaking away from the past, but its satiated narrative is only partially engrossing, heart-warming and satisfying. It may be well-meaning and genuine, a courageous and laudable gesture from Akin, but it fails to leave an impressive and evocative register.

    The Cut is beautifully designed and shot, whether it is in the desert, on the Atlantic Oceans or in the American plains. Its title may be a metaphorical representation of the hero's separation from his family, his journey to a foreign land, or his breaking away from the past, but its satiated narrative is only partially engrossing, heart-warming and satisfying. It may be well-meaning and genuine, a courageous and laudable gesture from Akin, but it fails to leave an impressive and evocative register.

  • Aug 02, 2015

    Movie caring details of the time it narrates, showing us a story quite alien to our culture. Great film music.

    Movie caring details of the time it narrates, showing us a story quite alien to our culture. Great film music.

  • Jun 10, 2015

    Fantastic film, saw it at the Cinetopia film fest in the Detroit area last night. I didn't think it could keep my attention at 2 hours and 20 minutes long, but it did. Crazy journey but one that was interesting to watch.

    Fantastic film, saw it at the Cinetopia film fest in the Detroit area last night. I didn't think it could keep my attention at 2 hours and 20 minutes long, but it did. Crazy journey but one that was interesting to watch.

  • May 31, 2015

    Faith Akin's eternal proposition about ethnic identity. And I like Tahar Rahim too. The film however is just so overlong, yet disjointed, but kinda hollow deep down.

    Faith Akin's eternal proposition about ethnic identity. And I like Tahar Rahim too. The film however is just so overlong, yet disjointed, but kinda hollow deep down.

  • Apr 19, 2015

    Enjoyed viewing The Cut at the Tribeca Film Fest. It's a global Hero's journey politically relevant and beautifully filmed. The scenes filmed in Cuba are a bonus delight. Strong directing, and acting and writing but an editing cut of @15min. would help this "must see" film about the Armenian genocide.

    Enjoyed viewing The Cut at the Tribeca Film Fest. It's a global Hero's journey politically relevant and beautifully filmed. The scenes filmed in Cuba are a bonus delight. Strong directing, and acting and writing but an editing cut of @15min. would help this "must see" film about the Armenian genocide.

  • Mar 02, 2015

    Although its concrete consequences are never fully addressed, the genocide is graphic and appalling; a strong, visually successful cinematic statement, dominating the first forty-five minutes. Unfortunately, the film staggers for the remaining two thirds, which roughly equate to well over one hour.

    Although its concrete consequences are never fully addressed, the genocide is graphic and appalling; a strong, visually successful cinematic statement, dominating the first forty-five minutes. Unfortunately, the film staggers for the remaining two thirds, which roughly equate to well over one hour.