The Death of Louis XIV (La mort de Louis XIV) Reviews

  • Feb 19, 2018

    This isn't for everyone due to its slow pacing, but for other viewers, this film proves to be a real treat. Firstly, I liked the cinematography as it was reminiscent of a Rembrandt painting. Also, Leaud's acting was really good. He doesn't say much, but his grunts, heavy breathings, and facial expressions tell you all you need to know about what his character is feeling (the close up shots highlight this). The deterioration of his health is really slow and drawn out, but fascinating due to the nuance. There was also a great scene from the middle where Louis XIV stared directly into the camera for an uncomfortable amount of time while Mozart's "Mass in C Minor" played (one of the only usages of music in the film). This scene seems to herald the end or reveal that Louis XIV is starting to come to terms with his mortality. Overall, I was pretty intrigued by this film.

    This isn't for everyone due to its slow pacing, but for other viewers, this film proves to be a real treat. Firstly, I liked the cinematography as it was reminiscent of a Rembrandt painting. Also, Leaud's acting was really good. He doesn't say much, but his grunts, heavy breathings, and facial expressions tell you all you need to know about what his character is feeling (the close up shots highlight this). The deterioration of his health is really slow and drawn out, but fascinating due to the nuance. There was also a great scene from the middle where Louis XIV stared directly into the camera for an uncomfortable amount of time while Mozart's "Mass in C Minor" played (one of the only usages of music in the film). This scene seems to herald the end or reveal that Louis XIV is starting to come to terms with his mortality. Overall, I was pretty intrigued by this film.

  • Jan 23, 2018

    This was listed as one of the best movies 0f 2017 and was interesting. King Louis XIV is the longest ruling monarch in European history and even he had to die. This is about his last two weeks, mostly in bed, and, of course, all in French. (It was a rainy cold day!)

    This was listed as one of the best movies 0f 2017 and was interesting. King Louis XIV is the longest ruling monarch in European history and even he had to die. This is about his last two weeks, mostly in bed, and, of course, all in French. (It was a rainy cold day!)

  • May 08, 2017

    Serra and Leaud collude to portray suffering as the unseen protagonist - the suffering of the King and the suffering of the audience. The dark scene, the plodding drawn out agony of the King, and the subtle but evocative performance of Leaud are at once boring and fascinating. Finally, in a film devoid of the background music that instructs the audience how it ought to feel, a dramatic up-swell of Mozart seems to herald the end we've all been waiting for. Leaud stares directly into the camera, panting, suffering, while Mozart demands that our hearts race, that tension builds... for no reason. The King isn't dead yet. Suffering will not even pay heed to Mozart. To be brief, this film was fantastic. If you adore sumptuous, over dramatic, corset rippers, you will probably hate it. It was the kind of organic, realistic, portrayal of European nobility that is so lacking in so many popular franchises (I'm looking at you Tudors and Versailles). I wish there was more.

    Serra and Leaud collude to portray suffering as the unseen protagonist - the suffering of the King and the suffering of the audience. The dark scene, the plodding drawn out agony of the King, and the subtle but evocative performance of Leaud are at once boring and fascinating. Finally, in a film devoid of the background music that instructs the audience how it ought to feel, a dramatic up-swell of Mozart seems to herald the end we've all been waiting for. Leaud stares directly into the camera, panting, suffering, while Mozart demands that our hearts race, that tension builds... for no reason. The King isn't dead yet. Suffering will not even pay heed to Mozart. To be brief, this film was fantastic. If you adore sumptuous, over dramatic, corset rippers, you will probably hate it. It was the kind of organic, realistic, portrayal of European nobility that is so lacking in so many popular franchises (I'm looking at you Tudors and Versailles). I wish there was more.

  • Mar 31, 2017

    Painterly but completely claustrophobic as we inch our way through the agonizing death spiral of Louis XIV. Why? For a few kernels of period quackery.

    Painterly but completely claustrophobic as we inch our way through the agonizing death spiral of Louis XIV. Why? For a few kernels of period quackery.

  • Mar 14, 2017

    On the end of an absolute monarch and the advent of modern day medecine. On the gap between interpersonal human empathy and public, political interests.

    On the end of an absolute monarch and the advent of modern day medecine. On the gap between interpersonal human empathy and public, political interests.