The Duel at Silver Creek Reviews

  • Sep 06, 2018

    The Duel at Silver Creek is a decent film. It is about Marshal Tyrone and the Silver Kid who form an uneasy alliance against a gang of claim jumpers. Audie Murphy and Stephen McNally give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Don Siegel did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the action.

    The Duel at Silver Creek is a decent film. It is about Marshal Tyrone and the Silver Kid who form an uneasy alliance against a gang of claim jumpers. Audie Murphy and Stephen McNally give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Don Siegel did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the action.

  • Nov 01, 2016

    170425: Neat villains including the beautiful but nasty Opal Lacy (Faith Domergue) and Johnny Sombrero (Eugene Iglesias). A bit shocking to see Opal at work the first time. Just doesn't seem to fit with a 1950s western. Lee Marvin stars as Tinhorn Burgess and Luke Cromwell (Audie Murphy) looks almost as good as his horse sporting a dual holster rig. Wasn't a big fan of the narration but liked this film's darker nature and focus on gun fighting. Plays like a 40s detective film noir. Got a kick out of all the nicknames.

    170425: Neat villains including the beautiful but nasty Opal Lacy (Faith Domergue) and Johnny Sombrero (Eugene Iglesias). A bit shocking to see Opal at work the first time. Just doesn't seem to fit with a 1950s western. Lee Marvin stars as Tinhorn Burgess and Luke Cromwell (Audie Murphy) looks almost as good as his horse sporting a dual holster rig. Wasn't a big fan of the narration but liked this film's darker nature and focus on gun fighting. Plays like a 40s detective film noir. Got a kick out of all the nicknames.

  • Nov 23, 2014

    'Duel At Silver Creek' is a co-starring vehicle for Audie Murphy, the last of the great B-movie western stars, briskly directed by the great Don Siegel... They had one obstacle on their way: The Silver Kid--With beautiful color and too much action, this little Western is nice to watch... The female of the species is more deadly than the male!!

    'Duel At Silver Creek' is a co-starring vehicle for Audie Murphy, the last of the great B-movie western stars, briskly directed by the great Don Siegel... They had one obstacle on their way: The Silver Kid--With beautiful color and too much action, this little Western is nice to watch... The female of the species is more deadly than the male!!

  • Nov 26, 2013

    very nice western ! audie murphy have a charisma ! it's simple story with action ! And the atmosphere is perfect for this kind of movie ! I have love it !

    very nice western ! audie murphy have a charisma ! it's simple story with action ! And the atmosphere is perfect for this kind of movie ! I have love it !

  • Jul 14, 2011

    Below-par shoot-out western with little presence from Audie Murphy.

    Below-par shoot-out western with little presence from Audie Murphy.

  • Dec 30, 2010

    An excellent example of why Siegel was a fantastic director. Here he elevates generic B-Western material and turns it into a tense action movie. Solid direction and a young Lee Marvin!

    An excellent example of why Siegel was a fantastic director. Here he elevates generic B-Western material and turns it into a tense action movie. Solid direction and a young Lee Marvin!

  • Aug 29, 2010

    Audie Murphy couldn't act but he really wore the black leather jacket well as The Silver Kid. The real star is the piledriver pace of Don Siegel's direction. And you've gotta love any movie from 1952 where the first time you see the femme fatale she strangles some poor sap with his own kerchief.

    Audie Murphy couldn't act but he really wore the black leather jacket well as The Silver Kid. The real star is the piledriver pace of Don Siegel's direction. And you've gotta love any movie from 1952 where the first time you see the femme fatale she strangles some poor sap with his own kerchief.

  • Aug 09, 2009

    “Big Steal” director Don Siegel’s first western outing, “Duel at Silver Creek,” bristles with gunfights galore, posses of dust-raising horsemen, and a hefty body count. Decorated World War II veteran Audie Murphy co-stars with Stephen McNally and Faith Domergue. Lee Marvin lurks on the periphery as a minor supporting character while perennial bad guy Gerald Mohr portrays the chief villain who leads a gang of homicidal henchmen. Friendship, deception, intrigue, and betrayal emerge as the major themes in this briskly-paced, 77-minute, Technicolor, horse opera that doesn’t wear out its welcome. “Armored Car Robbery” scenarist Gerald Drayson Adams and “Buccaneer's Girl” scribe Joseph Hoffman have fashioned an interesting sagebrusher that takes advantage of several film noir elements. First, leading lady Faith Domergue is a murderous siren who takes McNally for a ride. Second, the McNally lawman provides the narration and endures the paranoia that comes with getting crippled by a bullet. “Duel at Silver Creek” was among the earliest westerns that used the gimmick of the gunman who had trouble pulling the trigger. This theme would become a convention during the 1950s. Third, the Silver Kid is a black, leather-coat clad trigger-happy gambler out for revenge that the McNally lawman exploits because he cannot reveal his own dark secret without jeopardizing his life. Indeed, while most of the action occurs during the day, a murder takes place at night. Nevertheless, “Duel at Silver Creek” could be classified as a film noir western. Against a vigorous montage of murder and mayhem, the narrator (Stephen McNally) establishes the conflict in “Duel at Silver Creek.” He begins: “For some time there’d been reports about a vicious gang of claim jumpers who’d been forcing miners to sign away their claims through fear of torture or death. The claims were then transferred to one of their own men or were sold to innocent miners who had just arrived in the territory and were looking for new claims to work. These claim jumpers were smart enough not to try to grab some of the bigger mines where there might be enough men working to put up a fight. Usually, they picked on claims being worked by one or two men. And the more defenseless these men were, the better the claim jumpers liked it. Their plan was simple and foolproof, because nobody knew who they were. Since their victims either disappeared, or were found dead, there wasn’t anyone who could put their finger on these jumpers. Working a claim became a might dangerous business for any miner because no one knew when or where they’d turn up next.” Two miners are shot dead in cold blood by the claim jumpers. Luke Cromwell (Audie Murphy of “Comanche Creek”) and his father have just made a gold strike when the claim jumpers ride up for their next foray. “There’s enough dust there to blind a man. The jubilant father proclaims, “Looks like we staked one with some pay dirt this time, son!” The father beams with joy. “Now, you can buy all the silver you want. You won’t have to go around playing poker for it.” Rod Lacey (Gerald Mohr of “Invasion, U.S.A.”) sends two men to ambush Luke after he rides away. Luke thwarts the two ambushers. McNally resumes his narration: “Then old man Tompkins struck it rich a few miles north of Silver City and the jumpers moved in and killed him. As usual, they made a clean getaway, but this time they left a trail I thought we could follow and as I was Marshal of Silver City, I decided to get up a posse to track them down.” Marshal Tyrone’s mentor, Dan 'Pop' Muzik (Griff Barnett of “Cass Timberlane”), wants to serve as marshal for Tyrone while the marshal is out with the posse. Tyrone leaves him in charge of Silver City. The posse runs down the claim jumpers, but Tyrone catches a slug in his right shoulder. The posse continues their pursuit, while Tyrone recuperates at Fort Lowell. He meets Opal Lacy (Faith Domergue of “Where Danger Lives”) before she takes a stage to Silver City. The authorities bring a dying man to Fort Lowell and Opal offers to assist the physician. She sends the wounded Tyrone off on an errand. After the two men leave the man with Opal, she strangles him quickly. Later, she tells Tyrone that she is heading to Silver City to help her brother, Rod, run his mining business. When Tyrone returns, he learns that Pop was gunned down at night in the back. Immediately, Tyrone suspects the culprit in Pop’s murder is a Mexican gunman named Johnny Sombrero (Eugene Iglesias of “The Brave Bulls”) who has been a burr under his saddle. Rod provides Johnny with an alibi, and Opal suggests the killer may be the Silver Kid. “They say the Silver Kid is awfully fast with his guns,” she warns Tyrone. Instead of arresting the Silver Kid (Audie Murphy), Tyrone deputizes him because he knows that he needs a fast gun to back him up. Opal strings along Tyrone. They call each other Brown Eyes and Lightning and he falls for him lock, stock and barrel. The Kid and Tyrone have an on-again, off-again relationship because he tries to convince the marshal that Brown Eyes is treacherous. Eventually, Tyrone learns about Brown Eyes’ treachery. Initially, Tyrone believes that the Kid betrayed him when he informed Johnny about his inability to pull the trigger. The surprise ending where one of the heroes shoots the other one in the arm is clever, and Siegel and his writers ramrod a lot of exposition down our throats under the circumstances. Although Silver Creek is never seen, one character describes the setting for the finale as located near Silver Creek. Evidently, Universal Studios decided to bank on a sizzling, tell-all title like “Duel at Silver Creek” rather than something like “Duel near Silver Creek.” The flavorful dialogue, especially the exchanges between Murphy and McNally, is quite good.

    “Big Steal” director Don Siegel’s first western outing, “Duel at Silver Creek,” bristles with gunfights galore, posses of dust-raising horsemen, and a hefty body count. Decorated World War II veteran Audie Murphy co-stars with Stephen McNally and Faith Domergue. Lee Marvin lurks on the periphery as a minor supporting character while perennial bad guy Gerald Mohr portrays the chief villain who leads a gang of homicidal henchmen. Friendship, deception, intrigue, and betrayal emerge as the major themes in this briskly-paced, 77-minute, Technicolor, horse opera that doesn’t wear out its welcome. “Armored Car Robbery” scenarist Gerald Drayson Adams and “Buccaneer's Girl” scribe Joseph Hoffman have fashioned an interesting sagebrusher that takes advantage of several film noir elements. First, leading lady Faith Domergue is a murderous siren who takes McNally for a ride. Second, the McNally lawman provides the narration and endures the paranoia that comes with getting crippled by a bullet. “Duel at Silver Creek” was among the earliest westerns that used the gimmick of the gunman who had trouble pulling the trigger. This theme would become a convention during the 1950s. Third, the Silver Kid is a black, leather-coat clad trigger-happy gambler out for revenge that the McNally lawman exploits because he cannot reveal his own dark secret without jeopardizing his life. Indeed, while most of the action occurs during the day, a murder takes place at night. Nevertheless, “Duel at Silver Creek” could be classified as a film noir western. Against a vigorous montage of murder and mayhem, the narrator (Stephen McNally) establishes the conflict in “Duel at Silver Creek.” He begins: “For some time there’d been reports about a vicious gang of claim jumpers who’d been forcing miners to sign away their claims through fear of torture or death. The claims were then transferred to one of their own men or were sold to innocent miners who had just arrived in the territory and were looking for new claims to work. These claim jumpers were smart enough not to try to grab some of the bigger mines where there might be enough men working to put up a fight. Usually, they picked on claims being worked by one or two men. And the more defenseless these men were, the better the claim jumpers liked it. Their plan was simple and foolproof, because nobody knew who they were. Since their victims either disappeared, or were found dead, there wasn’t anyone who could put their finger on these jumpers. Working a claim became a might dangerous business for any miner because no one knew when or where they’d turn up next.” Two miners are shot dead in cold blood by the claim jumpers. Luke Cromwell (Audie Murphy of “Comanche Creek”) and his father have just made a gold strike when the claim jumpers ride up for their next foray. “There’s enough dust there to blind a man. The jubilant father proclaims, “Looks like we staked one with some pay dirt this time, son!” The father beams with joy. “Now, you can buy all the silver you want. You won’t have to go around playing poker for it.” Rod Lacey (Gerald Mohr of “Invasion, U.S.A.”) sends two men to ambush Luke after he rides away. Luke thwarts the two ambushers. McNally resumes his narration: “Then old man Tompkins struck it rich a few miles north of Silver City and the jumpers moved in and killed him. As usual, they made a clean getaway, but this time they left a trail I thought we could follow and as I was Marshal of Silver City, I decided to get up a posse to track them down.” Marshal Tyrone’s mentor, Dan 'Pop' Muzik (Griff Barnett of “Cass Timberlane”), wants to serve as marshal for Tyrone while the marshal is out with the posse. Tyrone leaves him in charge of Silver City. The posse runs down the claim jumpers, but Tyrone catches a slug in his right shoulder. The posse continues their pursuit, while Tyrone recuperates at Fort Lowell. He meets Opal Lacy (Faith Domergue of “Where Danger Lives”) before she takes a stage to Silver City. The authorities bring a dying man to Fort Lowell and Opal offers to assist the physician. She sends the wounded Tyrone off on an errand. After the two men leave the man with Opal, she strangles him quickly. Later, she tells Tyrone that she is heading to Silver City to help her brother, Rod, run his mining business. When Tyrone returns, he learns that Pop was gunned down at night in the back. Immediately, Tyrone suspects the culprit in Pop’s murder is a Mexican gunman named Johnny Sombrero (Eugene Iglesias of “The Brave Bulls”) who has been a burr under his saddle. Rod provides Johnny with an alibi, and Opal suggests the killer may be the Silver Kid. “They say the Silver Kid is awfully fast with his guns,” she warns Tyrone. Instead of arresting the Silver Kid (Audie Murphy), Tyrone deputizes him because he knows that he needs a fast gun to back him up. Opal strings along Tyrone. They call each other Brown Eyes and Lightning and he falls for him lock, stock and barrel. The Kid and Tyrone have an on-again, off-again relationship because he tries to convince the marshal that Brown Eyes is treacherous. Eventually, Tyrone learns about Brown Eyes’ treachery. Initially, Tyrone believes that the Kid betrayed him when he informed Johnny about his inability to pull the trigger. The surprise ending where one of the heroes shoots the other one in the arm is clever, and Siegel and his writers ramrod a lot of exposition down our throats under the circumstances. Although Silver Creek is never seen, one character describes the setting for the finale as located near Silver Creek. Evidently, Universal Studios decided to bank on a sizzling, tell-all title like “Duel at Silver Creek” rather than something like “Duel near Silver Creek.” The flavorful dialogue, especially the exchanges between Murphy and McNally, is quite good.

  • Feb 10, 2008

    I loved it! It's one of the few westerns that is in my top 10

    I loved it! It's one of the few westerns that is in my top 10

  • Dec 26, 2007

    This entertaining Western doesn't have anything substantial to say, but it sure is a lot of fun.

    This entertaining Western doesn't have anything substantial to say, but it sure is a lot of fun.