Hemingway's Garden of Eden (2010) - Rotten Tomatoes

Hemingway's Garden of Eden (2010)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Hemingway's Garden of Eden Videos

Hemingway's Garden of Eden Photos

Movie Info

Produced for Tranquil Seas by Lorne Thyssen and Timothy J. Lewiston, directed by John Irvin and starring Mena Suvari, Jack Huston, Caterina Murino, Carmen Maura, Richard E. Grant and Matthew Modine, "Hemingway's Garden Of Eden" was adapted from the Ernest Hemingway book by former Paris Review editor James Scott Linville. The book was published posthumously and, when it finally hit the bookstores in 1986, it was an immediate success. It remains one of Hemingway's most debated novels. Set in the jazz age years, prior to the depression, the story follows a successful young American writer, David Bourne (JACK HUSTON), and his beautiful wife, Catherine (MENA SUVARI), on their extended honeymoon in Europe. Catherine soon becomes restless and starts to test her husband's devotion, pushing him to the limits of her imagination. Already unsure of the games his wife is playing, David is both uncomfortable and curious when she brings a sultry Italian girl, Marita (CATERINA MURINO), to spice things up. As the erotic game reaches new levels, the events that follow will change their lives forever. --© Roadside Attractions
Rating:
R (for strong sexual content, nudity and some language)
Genre:
Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Box Office:
$22,083.00
Runtime:
Studio:

Watch it now

Cast

Mena Suvari
as Catherine Bourne
Jack Huston
as David Bourne
Carmen Maura
as Madame Aurol
Richard E. Grant
as Colonel Boyle
Matthew Modine
as David's Father
Mathias Palsvig
as Young Davey
Héctor Tomás
as Patrice
Dritan Biba
as Patron/Waiter
Luis Callejo
as Monsieur Jean
Álvaro Roig
as Vladimir
Yael Belicha
as Girl Onlooker
Igacio Gijon Solis
as Ritz Waiter
Enrique Zaldua
as Waiter #2
Lola Peno
as Rotund Woman
Isabella Orlowska
as Constanza
Alejandro Arroyo
as Man in Crowd
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Hemingway's Garden of Eden

All Critics (23) | Top Critics (7)

It just seems like a bunch of actors playing dress-up.

December 10, 2010
Dallas Morning News
Top Critic

Everybody flirts with everyone else as director John Irvin pours on a level of shopping-mall-gift-shop-kitsch that would shame Wayne Newton.

Full Review… | December 10, 2010
New York Post
Top Critic

Better than it might have been yet still a definite letdown, a literary B-side turned into something not awful, just forgettable.

Full Review… | December 9, 2010
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

Ms. Suvari's Catherine is so extravagantly monstrous that Mr. Huston's David, who provides a desultory narration, comes across as an inert nonentity.

December 9, 2010
New York Times
Top Critic

The dialogue and plot in Garden Of Eden are rendered clearly and precisely, without a lot of fine shading. The result is a movie that's all surface... all silly, silly surface.

Full Review… | December 9, 2010
AV Club
Top Critic

Vet British helmer John Irvin's mannered, bloodless and appallingly thesped filmization of Hemingway's posthumous novel, though unlikely to set the author rolling in his grave, may still have viewers rolling in the aisles.

Full Review… | December 9, 2010
Variety
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Hemingway's Garden of Eden

½

A writer and his wife take up with an Italian woman, and the three form an odd love triangle filled with lust and temptation. Garden of Eden confuses me. I haven't read the novel, but after the film, I want to. From what I can tell from the film, it seems like a first draft -- ideas that Papa plays with but hasn't developed into real characters yet. As Catherine transforms herself and her husband into carbon copies and as Catherine expresses her sexual obsession with Marita, it seems like Hemingway is exploring the slippery nature of sexuality -- how one can experiment with one's sexual identity. But what Hemingway specifically says about this concept remains unclear. It's doubtless that the story David writes -- told in flashbacks starring Matthew Modine -- is a mess. It's Hemingway's fantasies about manhood expressed through hunting and domination over nature. But this story has little to do with the frame story and doesn't give us any significant insight into David's character. Overall, I wonder if the novel is this incomplete because although the film has the beginnings of some interesting additions to Hem's oeuvre, it ultimately doesn't amount to much.

Jim Hunter
Jim Hunter

Super Reviewer

½

This movie was hard to relate to as life is nothing like this anymore. The cast was good, but overall the story was lacking.

Heather Metzger
Heather Metzger

Ernest Hemingway's novel 'Garden of Eden' was published posthumously (25 years or so after the author's death) and after the film adaptation was made it set on a shelf for a few years before somebody found a worthy-enough reason to release it (I don't know what that worthy reason would be as the film is frightfully awful and I can find nothing redeeming with it whatsoever). The film's title lets the audience in on the secret that it is BEYOND bad as its director, John Irvin (Widow's Peak, Hamburger Hill), tried to salvage the wreck and give it some prestige by emblazoning poor Ernest's last name before the title of this trashy piece of junk. David Bourne (Jack Huston - Outlander, Factory Girl, 'Shrooms) is a young, American writer living in Paris who hasn't found much success with his pen when he meets his future wife Catherine (Mena Suvari - American Beauty, American Pie, Domino) -- a wealthy, restless, adventuresome, domineering troublemaker whom is EXTREMELY un-likable (three minutes into the film I hated her ... how Mr. Bourne pursues her and than marries her is beyond comprehension). She pouts and whines and cries and bullies and invents bedroom role-playing scenarios that are disturbing to say th least. On an extended honeymoon in Spain, the pair inhabit a rather isolated cottage complete with a few supporting characters (oh -- "the help") that allow Catherine to manipulate and test her husband's devotion. Thirty-minutes into the film you realize you can care less about ALL of it ... and I just waited for it to be over. The movie has a very B-movie feel to it and parts of it play-out like cheap skinemax erotica-wannabe. To avoid even harsher criticism, I'll simply conclude with "there is nothing good here" -- that way one can this out to be as bad as he/she wishes.

Thomas Williams
Thomas Williams

Hemingway's Garden of Eden Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Discussion Forum

Discuss Hemingway's Garden of Eden on our Movie forum!

News & Features