The Great Wall (2017) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Great Wall (2017)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: For a Yimou Zhang film featuring Matt Damon and Willem Dafoe battling ancient monsters, The Great Wall is neither as exciting nor as entertainingly bonkers as one might hope.

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Starring global superstar Matt Damon and directed by one of the most breathtaking visual stylists of our time, Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers), Legendary's The Great Wall tells the story of an elite force making a valiant stand for humanity on the world's most iconic structure. The first English-language production for Yimou is the largest film ever shot entirely in China. The Great Wall also stars Jing Tian, Pedro Pascal, Willem Dafoe and Andy Lau.

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Cast

Matt Damon
as William Garin
Tian Jing
as Commander Lin Mae
Pedro Pascal
as Pero Tovar
Willem Dafoe
as Ballard
Hanyu Zhang
as General Shao
Eddie Peng
as Commander Wu
Lu Han (V)
as Peng Yong
Kenny Lin
as Commander Chen
Karry Junkai Wang
as The Emperor
Cheney Chen
as Imperial Guard
Xuan Huang
as Commander Deng
Andy Lau
as Strategist Wang
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Critic Reviews for The Great Wall

All Critics (181) | Top Critics (40)

Its epic imagery - the rows of soldiers, the rain of spears, the surging forces - is undercut by the Saturday-matinee cheesiness of the concept.

February 23, 2017 | Full Review…
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

If this is the future for motion pictures, god help us all.

February 19, 2017 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…
ReelViews
Top Critic

To watch it is to be aware of how little movies this size have to do with art and how much they are product, the result of a calculation involving actorly appeal and spectacle, because spectacle, not story, has the... most universal draw.

February 17, 2017 | Full Review…
BuzzFeed News
Top Critic

Damon's wild-haired gringo claims to have soldiered under "many flags," which would explain his shape-shifting accent that's Irish except for when it sounds beamed from Mars.

February 17, 2017 | Rating: C | Full Review…
MTV
Top Critic

What a bummer that all Chinese master Zhang Yimou and Hollywood star Matt Damon come up with is a B-level creature feature with delusions of grandeur.

February 17, 2017 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…
Rolling Stone
Top Critic

As pure spectacle, The Great Wall is absolutely dazzling.

February 17, 2017 | Full Review…
Village Voice
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Great Wall

½

Strictly for the kiddies. There's one portion that features women bungee jumping as if Olympic divers from the wall to attack monsters with spears - so ridiculous that only the kiddies wouldn't question it. Gonna need lotsa butter with that popcorn. And pass.

Kevin M. Williams
Kevin M. Williams

Super Reviewer

½

Pretty entertaining even if it's nothing original or new as we can guess what happens and when it happens but it does have some good action scenes and the effects were pretty good too, I maybe expected the battle scenes to be abit more epic though, I can't comment on the 3D as I watched the 2D version but I think it would if been pretty good in 3D, The film had a good idea but never really left the comfort zone, It's a good movie but with a strong cast it could/should of been a little bit better.

Jamie Clarke
Jamie Clarke

Super Reviewer

The Great Wall is the most expensive film in Chinese history and the first major co-production between an American film studio and a Chinese-owned studio. While Matt Damon is the name above the title, it's filled with recognizable Chinese stars, like Andy Lau, Eddie Peng, and pop star Lu Han. China's most renowned action filmmaker, Zhang Yimou, serves as the director. It has the look and feel of a Hollywood special effects epic but it's very much a Chinese film in ownership and execution, perhaps marking a new synergy of East meets West blockbusters. With a whopping budget of $150 million, the same as the last Star Trek movie, it looks like a typical Hollywood big-budget epic with visual spectacle and sweeping vistas. It's up to the viewer whether a majority-Chinese production successfully imitating Hollywood middlebrow action spectacle is a brave step forward or just another source for mediocrity. In the 11th centruy, traveling European mercenaries William (Damon) and Tovar (Game of Thrones' Pedro Pascal) are looking for black powder, an explosive substance that's worth serious money back home. A mysterious feral creature attacks them and William cuts off the beast's hand, taking it as a trophy. The Nameless Order, Chinese military officials stationed at the titular great wall, capture them and want to know exactly how these foreigners were able to defeat this beast. Legend states that long ago a meteor crashed to Earth, and with it came a horde of green monsters with big teeth lead by a queen that psychically controls her thousands of attack drones. Every 60 years the creatures emerge searching for food for their ravenous appetites. The Imperial City must be protected at all costs and that is why the wall was constructed. Lin Mae (Tian Jing) is thrown into command when her male superiors are killed, and she relies upon her unexpected Western allies to throw back the evolving horde of monsters. As the first major big-budget collaboration between studios in China and the United States, The Great Wall feels like something that would have escaped from the 1990s era of tentpole filmmaking, and it's clearly a paycheck film for all involved. Now that doesn't condemn in either regard. There's a certain charm to the relatively dumb sci-fi action movies that started being prepped with steady regularity in the 1990s when advancing special effects made it possible for hordes of CGI monsters to thwart. There's an obvious point of engagement that crosses all translations: man versus monsters. The film even somewhat admirably knows its own ridiculousness and embraces it. I was reminded of the go-for-broke silliness of Jerry Bruckheimer's movies like National Treasure's positing that maybe, just maybe, there's a treasure map on the back of the Declaration of Independence. This feels like the biggest budget Asylum movie you can imagine, and that in itself is not necessarily a problem. However, because of the mechanical nature of so much of its storytelling and the safe territory it resolutely occupies, The Great Wall is a mediocre monster movie that aims right down the middle for cross-continental mass appeal and nothing more. I'm almost certain that Damon had to have been paid $20 million dollars to justify his participation. The actors and the director go about their business in a professional manner but you feel the lack of passion. It's a film looking to appeal to the most people and losing any sense of distinction. Credit director Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers) for keeping the film on life support, providing just enough action variety and pleasing visuals to stir an audience awake. The monsters are introduced very early into the film, around the twenty-minute mark, and their CGI horde definitely presents a worthy challenge. In fact they feel too overwhelming in their numbers. Early on we see that the ferocious creatures, which closely resemble the Ghostbusters demon dog painted green, are hard to kill outside of a straight shot to their shoulder-eyes (they have eyes on their shoulders... because...). The first creature that successfully scales the wall takes out a slew of Chinese warriors. If one of these things is that hard to kill, how in the world can a limited number of people, even with high ground, defend against a sea of a hundred thousand? The mismatched numbers deflate the stakes and lessen the tension, which isn't helped from subpar characterization. The world building is certainly hazy (Why do they come out once every 60 years? Why do magnets affect them? Why all the effort for small food supplies?) and some of the elements feel inserted just for their "cool" factor. A group of female warriors bungee jump off platforms to spear the monsters, but why is this necessary when we've already seen that China has fiery projectiles that are far more effective? It is cool though. Thankfully a movie with little going for it other than spectacle at least knows to vary up its action sequences. Each encounter with one of the monsters is structured differently. The best sequence may be William and Tovar navigating through a blinding fog and relying upon the sounds of whizzing arrows to alert them to approaching hungry monsters. It provides some fun tension and pop-out moments. There's a beautiful sequence commemorating a fallen friend with the launching of hundreds of floating lanterns. The concluding sequence involves our remaining characters climbing to the top of a pagoda lined with stained glass. As the characters rush up flights of stairs, the screen is lovingly diluted with colored shafts of light, which also add extra visual flourishes when the monsters begin to leap through the glass level by level. Yimou's use of color has always been a hallmark of his career and it translates even into the color-coded amour of the different divisions of the Nameless Order. They look like ancient Power Rangers. While lacking a great deal of overall tension due to its predictable nature and dull characters, there are fleeting moments of suspense drawn out in individual action set-pieces. The overall movie is generally unremarkable CGI carnage reminiscent of a too-late Lord of the Rings rip-off, and yet there's at least a general professionalism to its unremarkable CGI carnage. Early on the movie was hit with accusations of whitewashing, and given Hollywood's recent track record with the likes of Exodus, Aloha, and Gods of Egypt, it would be entirely conceivable that producers felt Damon needed to be a white savior role. That's not the case at all and in fact the Chinese forces are shown to be flawless specimens. Damon's character is the out-of-place European (complete with hard to place accent) who represents selfish and arrogant Western attitudes. He's routinely awed by the ability and precision of the Chinese warriors, who dutifully sacrifice for the greater good and safety of others they will never know. They are symbols of power, teamwork, courage, strength, and dignity. The lessons can be rather blunt (a woman... in charge?!). The portrayal of the Chinese forces is so honorable and so empowered that they come across as boring moral paragons without an ounce of traceably human nuance. They don't come across like characters so much as interchangeable warriors, and so when they start dying one-by-one their sacrifices ultimately leave little impact. It turns out that the non-Chinese actors, Damon and Pascal, supply the most interesting characters because their roles are allowed personality, basic moral ambiguity, and inner conflict beyond a sense of duty and the requirements of achieving that duty. The Great Wall drafts off Damon's worldwide star power to teach him a lesson about Eastern values. It certainly presents China and Chinese characters in a very positive perspective, but being so broad sanitizes their humanity and transforms people into boring paragons. Given the pedigree of those involved, it's completely expected to be underwhelmed by the end results of such an expensive East meets West collaboration. The Great Wall is ultimately too safe and stately to satisfy beyond generic genre thrills; lowering one's expectations is highly advised in order to properly appreciate the goofy action spectacle. The Great Wall of China being constructed to protect from a horde of ravenous, possibly extraterrestrial monsters is certainly a silly premise, but the movie doesn't pretend it's anything than what it is, a large-scale monster movie with a sense of fun. It's not soaked in deconstructive irony or meta commentary. Instead, The Great Wall is a straight-laced action spectacle that treats its absurdity with conviction. It's not much better or worse than other empty-headed big-budget action cinema from the Hollywood assembly line, but is that progress? Is making an indistinguishable mediocre B-movie a success story? Nate's Grade: C

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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