The Invisible Man Reviews

Page 1 of 2
March 25, 2020
Moss, so attuned to the nuances of trauma in the early going, devolves into revenge movie clichés. There's nothing wrong with an old-fashioned horror flick, but it's frustrating to watch a film make a grab for greatness and end up grasping only air.
March 23, 2020
But "The Invisible Man," alas, comes off as underpopulated, unpersuasive and cheap.
March 6, 2020
Moss gives it her all, throwing herself into the role, literally and figuratively, with courageous abandon. Still, such attributes feel lost on a film far too content to render story logic and common sense as invisible as the bad guy.
March 5, 2020
Lack of urgency trips "Invisible Man."
March 3, 2020
There's a very serious message here, and it needs to be delivered in a far more complex, sophisticated way that matches Moss's fearless work. She's real. Her co-stars are devices.
March 2, 2020
A bracingly modern #MeToo allegory that, despite its brutal craft, rings hollow.
March 2, 2020
While chock full of relatively good scares, campy effects and an ending that will tickle a very specific demographic of 1990s and 2000s thriller fans with glee, The Invisible Man doesn't deliver more than that.
February 29, 2020
The plot has more holes than a brimming pin cushion.
February 29, 2020
In fact, instead of surprising us with something new, he has gone in the opposite direction and has rendered the invisible man, well, truly invisible...
February 29, 2020
[Elisabeth Moss] is a victim in this movie for a long, long time, and I didn't really care for that.
February 28, 2020
... more concerned with high-tech gimmickry than emotional investment in those who are, um, visible.
February 28, 2020
It might deserve some credit for injecting a few doses of effective horror elements into the form of psychological manipulation known as gaslighting, but [it] falls apart at the seams in the thriller's hokey and illogical second half.
February 28, 2020
So it falls to me to be that guy. The woke critic who points out that the film sadistically brutalizes women for 120 minutes of entertainment in order, ostensibly, to tell us that brutalizing women is bad.
February 28, 2020
[A] film whose smarter points, like its antagonist, ultimately blink in and out of existence before standing, dark and disappointing, and clocking you over the head.
February 28, 2020
An initially gripping and chilling psychological horror thriller that loses internal logic along with Hitchcockian suspense midway. Slickly edited, overlong and overproduced. Elisabeth Moss gives a convincingly moving performance, though.
February 28, 2020
[Writer-director Leigh Whannell] seems more interested in the mechanics of torture than in giving the very real emotional framework of abuse its due.
February 28, 2020
An intriguing take on a classic that falls short when adhering to traditional conventions of horror
February 28, 2020
Whannell's direction, as well as his construction of scenes, is, for the most part, of the straight-to-cable variety, taking portentousness for suspense and the illustration of facts for drama.
February 27, 2020
I do not understand what people see here. It's not an s-f horror hybrid about a scientist desiring God-like power anymore. It's a bad boyfriend film with almost no science in it. Optics, indeed.
February 27, 2020
It's never fair to judge a movie based on what you want it to be. But when that movie sets an explicit goal and then fails to meet it - heck, doesn't even try to meet it - it's open season.
Page 1 of 2