The King of Staten Island Reviews

  • 2d ago

    I have to admit, my interest in this project hinged almost entirely on Bill Burr's involvement and, in this admittedly flawed regard, I suppose "The King Of Staten Island" doesn't necessarily disappoint. There are some memorable Burr-isms throughout (rants, one-liners, ball-busting, etc.), but this obviously isn't the Bill Burr show. So, as a semi-autobiographical look into the life and struggles of Pete Davidson, I can say "The King Of Staten Island" does well enough. Some have offered up criticisms involving the likability of the lead character and I'll surely sit for those. My main, protagonist-centric gripe really only involves the amount of inertia present within him for such a long portion of the movie. I understand that laziness and disillusionment are big parts of the character's inner turmoil, but having to follow someone with no inclination for any sort of activity can spell for a trying watch. This was that kind of watch for me at times. You're also handed the typical, Apatow-ian pitfalls — directionless scenes, bloated running times, etc. — which I always expect, but somehow never quite get used to. It helps that the third act is actually the best part of the movie this time around, something I never thought I'd say about an Apatow film since "the 40-Year-Old Virgin." In any case, though, this remains an ultimately enjoyable, yet occasionally rough offering.

    I have to admit, my interest in this project hinged almost entirely on Bill Burr's involvement and, in this admittedly flawed regard, I suppose "The King Of Staten Island" doesn't necessarily disappoint. There are some memorable Burr-isms throughout (rants, one-liners, ball-busting, etc.), but this obviously isn't the Bill Burr show. So, as a semi-autobiographical look into the life and struggles of Pete Davidson, I can say "The King Of Staten Island" does well enough. Some have offered up criticisms involving the likability of the lead character and I'll surely sit for those. My main, protagonist-centric gripe really only involves the amount of inertia present within him for such a long portion of the movie. I understand that laziness and disillusionment are big parts of the character's inner turmoil, but having to follow someone with no inclination for any sort of activity can spell for a trying watch. This was that kind of watch for me at times. You're also handed the typical, Apatow-ian pitfalls — directionless scenes, bloated running times, etc. — which I always expect, but somehow never quite get used to. It helps that the third act is actually the best part of the movie this time around, something I never thought I'd say about an Apatow film since "the 40-Year-Old Virgin." In any case, though, this remains an ultimately enjoyable, yet occasionally rough offering.

  • 2d ago

    If you're a big fan of Pete Davidson's humor, this movie is a must-see

    If you're a big fan of Pete Davidson's humor, this movie is a must-see

  • Avatar
    Glenn G Super Reviewer
    3d ago

    TATTOOED LOVE BOY - My Review of THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND (4 Stars) By now, we all know Judd Apatow makes long movies. With the right script, premise and actors, however, you may find yourself having a great time basking in his universe. He takes his time, allows for breathing room, and essentially makes mumblecore movies on a larger scale. Call it Jumbocore. With his latest, The King Of Staten Island, co-written by Pete Davidson and former SNL writer, Dave Sirus, Apatow has combined the classic hangout movie with elements of romcom, family drama, and a lot of heart. Davidson stars as Scott, an unemployed young man who lives with his mother Margie (Marisa Tomei),and younger sister Claire (Maude Apatow) in a modest Staten Island house, and spends most of his time in the basement playing video games and getting high with his friends. His father, a firefighter, died tragically when he was younger, and this contributes greatly to Scott's suicidal ideation, which we see in the opening scene. On a good day, Scott seems quick to outbursts or worse, tuning out the world. Even the most casual fans of Davidson will recognize the autobiographical elements at play here. Scott has vague dreams of opening a tattoo parlor/restaurant, which I'm sure sounded like a terrible idea when they wrote the script, but in light of our current situation, worsens exponentially. One fateful day, he attempts to ink a minor, which draws the ire of the kid's father Ray (Bill Burr) to Scott's door. Enraged and spitting bile at Margie, Ray, a local fireman, initiates undoubtedly what we'll call a meet-not-so-cute. What little story this shaggy film possesses lies in the machinations which bring Scott to Ray's firehouse to ostensibly learn to adopt a healthy work ethic and confront the demons from his past. Of course, this being a Judd Apatow film, the story goes off on many tangents, including a visit to his resentful sister who has just left home for college. Scott also has been having a quiet fling with his lifelong friend Kelsey (the gifted Bel Powley from The Diary Of A Teenage Girl) and also gets involved in a pharmaceutical caper with his pals. Under normal circumstances, I would call it all a bit too much, but thanks to a screenplay which doesn't try too hard to deliver constant zingers and an alive, honest, soulful performance by Davidson, I loved hanging out with these characters. Unlike Apatow's previous work, this film, while often very funny, benefits from staying grounded in Scott's mental health issues instead of insisting on a gag-a-minute pace. Davidson proves himself as an engaging, thoughtful, unpredictable actor who keeps you guessing his every move or reaction. It's impossible not to love this "loser" because when he tries, he connects so beautifully with others. I especially loved his sweetness with Ray's kids, holding their hands as he walks them to school and shows genuine interest in their lives. National treasure, Tomei, also brings so much warmth and vitality to what could easily have turned into the stock Mom character. Smart, observant and nobody's fool, Tomei milks one great scene after another for all they're worth, especially when she dresses down Ray and Scott for fighting or when she hilariously refuses to take Scott back into her house. In my fan fiction version of the production, I imagined Powley approached Tomei to tell her she was basing her character on Tomei's Oscar-winning My Cousin Vinny role. While not as broad, Powley's Kelsey has that extra New Yawwwk oomph and spunk to ring similarly delightful bells. Burr, best known for his standup comedy, also makes a strong, vibrant showing as an angry guy who needs to be nicer to Scott if he wants to stand a chance with Margie. Steve Buscemi, in a small but effective role as the chief at Ray's fire station, seems to exist to make us like Scott more, but that doesn't take anything away from Buscemi, a former firefighter himself, from giving a relaxed, generous appearance. What I love about Apatow's work is his ability to mine the pain buried beneath the surface of comic actors. Steve Carell, Seth Rogen and Amy Schumer have all benefited from surrendering themselves to Apatow's aesthetic. It also helps that Apatow has hired cinematographer Robert Elswit to give the film an unfussy but living, breathing look. Same goes for Kevin Thompson's production design, which displays a keen awareness of what those Staten Island homes really look like. While nothing earth-shattering, The King Of Staten Island moved me to tears, because it works so hard to welcome the Scotts of the world into the fold and to gently nudge them into finding their purpose. Scott bobs and weaves a lot, simultaneously sincere and diabolical at times. Witness the tattoo reveal on the back of one of our main characters for a specific example. Apatow doesn't tie things up into a neat little bow at the end, preferring to end things abruptly but perfectly in tune with the rhythms of his sweet, slightly lost, yet ultimately beautiful main character.

    TATTOOED LOVE BOY - My Review of THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND (4 Stars) By now, we all know Judd Apatow makes long movies. With the right script, premise and actors, however, you may find yourself having a great time basking in his universe. He takes his time, allows for breathing room, and essentially makes mumblecore movies on a larger scale. Call it Jumbocore. With his latest, The King Of Staten Island, co-written by Pete Davidson and former SNL writer, Dave Sirus, Apatow has combined the classic hangout movie with elements of romcom, family drama, and a lot of heart. Davidson stars as Scott, an unemployed young man who lives with his mother Margie (Marisa Tomei),and younger sister Claire (Maude Apatow) in a modest Staten Island house, and spends most of his time in the basement playing video games and getting high with his friends. His father, a firefighter, died tragically when he was younger, and this contributes greatly to Scott's suicidal ideation, which we see in the opening scene. On a good day, Scott seems quick to outbursts or worse, tuning out the world. Even the most casual fans of Davidson will recognize the autobiographical elements at play here. Scott has vague dreams of opening a tattoo parlor/restaurant, which I'm sure sounded like a terrible idea when they wrote the script, but in light of our current situation, worsens exponentially. One fateful day, he attempts to ink a minor, which draws the ire of the kid's father Ray (Bill Burr) to Scott's door. Enraged and spitting bile at Margie, Ray, a local fireman, initiates undoubtedly what we'll call a meet-not-so-cute. What little story this shaggy film possesses lies in the machinations which bring Scott to Ray's firehouse to ostensibly learn to adopt a healthy work ethic and confront the demons from his past. Of course, this being a Judd Apatow film, the story goes off on many tangents, including a visit to his resentful sister who has just left home for college. Scott also has been having a quiet fling with his lifelong friend Kelsey (the gifted Bel Powley from The Diary Of A Teenage Girl) and also gets involved in a pharmaceutical caper with his pals. Under normal circumstances, I would call it all a bit too much, but thanks to a screenplay which doesn't try too hard to deliver constant zingers and an alive, honest, soulful performance by Davidson, I loved hanging out with these characters. Unlike Apatow's previous work, this film, while often very funny, benefits from staying grounded in Scott's mental health issues instead of insisting on a gag-a-minute pace. Davidson proves himself as an engaging, thoughtful, unpredictable actor who keeps you guessing his every move or reaction. It's impossible not to love this "loser" because when he tries, he connects so beautifully with others. I especially loved his sweetness with Ray's kids, holding their hands as he walks them to school and shows genuine interest in their lives. National treasure, Tomei, also brings so much warmth and vitality to what could easily have turned into the stock Mom character. Smart, observant and nobody's fool, Tomei milks one great scene after another for all they're worth, especially when she dresses down Ray and Scott for fighting or when she hilariously refuses to take Scott back into her house. In my fan fiction version of the production, I imagined Powley approached Tomei to tell her she was basing her character on Tomei's Oscar-winning My Cousin Vinny role. While not as broad, Powley's Kelsey has that extra New Yawwwk oomph and spunk to ring similarly delightful bells. Burr, best known for his standup comedy, also makes a strong, vibrant showing as an angry guy who needs to be nicer to Scott if he wants to stand a chance with Margie. Steve Buscemi, in a small but effective role as the chief at Ray's fire station, seems to exist to make us like Scott more, but that doesn't take anything away from Buscemi, a former firefighter himself, from giving a relaxed, generous appearance. What I love about Apatow's work is his ability to mine the pain buried beneath the surface of comic actors. Steve Carell, Seth Rogen and Amy Schumer have all benefited from surrendering themselves to Apatow's aesthetic. It also helps that Apatow has hired cinematographer Robert Elswit to give the film an unfussy but living, breathing look. Same goes for Kevin Thompson's production design, which displays a keen awareness of what those Staten Island homes really look like. While nothing earth-shattering, The King Of Staten Island moved me to tears, because it works so hard to welcome the Scotts of the world into the fold and to gently nudge them into finding their purpose. Scott bobs and weaves a lot, simultaneously sincere and diabolical at times. Witness the tattoo reveal on the back of one of our main characters for a specific example. Apatow doesn't tie things up into a neat little bow at the end, preferring to end things abruptly but perfectly in tune with the rhythms of his sweet, slightly lost, yet ultimately beautiful main character.

  • 4d ago

    Just like any Judd Apatow movie, The King Of Staten Island is rather toothy in length and filled with hit-and-miss improvisational humor, but led by a strong performance from Pete Davidson. It could have used a little more direction in plot and the relationship between Powley and Davidson more attention, but Apatow knows how to build everything to a nice solid conclusion.

    Just like any Judd Apatow movie, The King Of Staten Island is rather toothy in length and filled with hit-and-miss improvisational humor, but led by a strong performance from Pete Davidson. It could have used a little more direction in plot and the relationship between Powley and Davidson more attention, but Apatow knows how to build everything to a nice solid conclusion.

  • 4d ago

    Loved this movie! Funny and heartfelt!

    Loved this movie! Funny and heartfelt!

  • 5d ago

    Éste es de ésos filmes que amas u odias gracias al personaje principal. La película es graciosa pero también es dura y en algunos puntos su comedia puede llegar a ser ofensiva. La historia se desarrolla de buena manera y hace un buen trabajo en desarrollar a los personajes y mostrarnos claramente los "obstáculos" a los que se enfrenta éste personaje que se sabotea constantemente. Éso precisamente es lo que hace menos interesante el personaje principal, la dirección que toma, a cada minuto se vuelve menos interesante y se va haciendo pequeño y los personajes alrededor crecen y se vuelven lo más importante, sobre todo el personaje que interpreta Bill Burr, que en verdad me sorprendió su trabajo. Una fórmula ya probada por Apatow anteriormente con grandes resultados, en éste caso la falta de un guión más consistente y más paciente hubiera apoyado más a Pete Davidson que hace un muy buen trabajo, pero no puede mantenerlo durante todo el filme desgraciadamente.

    Éste es de ésos filmes que amas u odias gracias al personaje principal. La película es graciosa pero también es dura y en algunos puntos su comedia puede llegar a ser ofensiva. La historia se desarrolla de buena manera y hace un buen trabajo en desarrollar a los personajes y mostrarnos claramente los "obstáculos" a los que se enfrenta éste personaje que se sabotea constantemente. Éso precisamente es lo que hace menos interesante el personaje principal, la dirección que toma, a cada minuto se vuelve menos interesante y se va haciendo pequeño y los personajes alrededor crecen y se vuelven lo más importante, sobre todo el personaje que interpreta Bill Burr, que en verdad me sorprendió su trabajo. Una fórmula ya probada por Apatow anteriormente con grandes resultados, en éste caso la falta de un guión más consistente y más paciente hubiera apoyado más a Pete Davidson que hace un muy buen trabajo, pero no puede mantenerlo durante todo el filme desgraciadamente.

  • 5d ago

    So sad that the pandemic hurt this movie so much. SNL is such hot garbage I judged Davidson unfairly forgetting how young he is plus all that other tabloid nonsense. He is credited as writing or co-writing and that right there on top of his acting, the casting is near perfect - big home run in my opinion that Davidson may not be able to take a victory lap for. Wherever the movie lags, or looses its narrative threads - overall I was extremely impressed. Bill Burr's casting and performance really brings it together in a wonderful way. I may be biased or see things in this film, due to my own experiences losing my father when I was 19, others may not. I really enjoyed it and I came in expecting to hate it. Note: I actually had to shut it off after the first 20 mins and had to try again because I thought I knew where things were going. So glad I was wrong. Damn, so many good performances.

    So sad that the pandemic hurt this movie so much. SNL is such hot garbage I judged Davidson unfairly forgetting how young he is plus all that other tabloid nonsense. He is credited as writing or co-writing and that right there on top of his acting, the casting is near perfect - big home run in my opinion that Davidson may not be able to take a victory lap for. Wherever the movie lags, or looses its narrative threads - overall I was extremely impressed. Bill Burr's casting and performance really brings it together in a wonderful way. I may be biased or see things in this film, due to my own experiences losing my father when I was 19, others may not. I really enjoyed it and I came in expecting to hate it. Note: I actually had to shut it off after the first 20 mins and had to try again because I thought I knew where things were going. So glad I was wrong. Damn, so many good performances.

  • 5d ago

    Not sure how this movie has such great reviews. It was slow and pretty depressing.

    Not sure how this movie has such great reviews. It was slow and pretty depressing.

  • Jul 02, 2020

    loved this movie. Give it a shot and you wont regret it. The performances and script were fantastic and it was overall a rewarding cinematic experience.

    loved this movie. Give it a shot and you wont regret it. The performances and script were fantastic and it was overall a rewarding cinematic experience.

  • Jul 01, 2020

    Amazing!!!! Bill burr and Pete Davidson 10/10

    Amazing!!!! Bill burr and Pete Davidson 10/10