The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter Reviews

  • Sep 28, 2020

    I never saw sequel when I was young thought my wife and I would do 1 and 2 while on Netflix. Holy cow is 2 bad. Absoluty devoid of the charm and imagination of the original. Total skip unless you just have to see it.

    I never saw sequel when I was young thought my wife and I would do 1 and 2 while on Netflix. Holy cow is 2 bad. Absoluty devoid of the charm and imagination of the original. Total skip unless you just have to see it.

  • Aug 23, 2020

    A far cry from Wolfgang Petersen's original. George T. Miller's fantasy adventure drama The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter (1990) is a pale imitation of what magical charm Wolfgang Petersen captured for his classic dark fantasy film The Neverending Story (1984). While Karin Howard's script doesn't compare to the thoughtful and reflective, yet subtle writing of the first film, Michael Ende's novel gets his second half adapted for this secondary picture. It stays true to the heart of the book's idea about youth and adults needing to read, loving your parents, raising your child kindly, using your imagination, staying true to your friends, and being brave in the face of adversity. The entire idea of Bastian being able to wish Fantasia better is expanded upon here in the sequel with deeper significance on a meta level and darker for the consequences of his choices come to fruition. Chris Blunden and Peter Hollywood's slow editing lets scenes go on for too long without interesting cuts to engage viewers making 89 minutes feel like 189. David Connell's cinematography uses beautiful wide shots to capture the lovely matte paintings in the background, yet reveals the dated CGI green screen effects. Connell doesn't use a lot of striking close-ups like the first relied on for emotional cues, so this just has a lot of nice medium shots and pretty wide shots without that emotionally devastating center. The puppetry is average with less lifelike movements than the first movie. They are also not as cute as in The Neverending Story. What happened to Falkor? Robert Folk's score is fairly pretty, but very scarcely used compared to the synth heavy Giorgio Moroder score from The Neverending Story. You only get the iconic theme song at the very end. I missed the music dearly in this lackluster sequel. It's cute and fun, but too childish for the sequel in all regards. Heidi Wujek's costumes are pretty neat for the villainess' dresses though. I must say I am quite impressed by child actor Jonathan Brandis, rest in peace, as the lead actor portraying Bastian this time around. He's so real and moving here, especially during the ending embrace with his cold father, played by an awkward John Wesley Shipp, who gets better as the film progresses. Brandis was a gem of an actor with his expressive eyes and genuine emotional performance, he was skilled beyond his brief years. Kenny Morrison is fine as Atreyu with an authentic friendship depiction, but he's not as compelling as the original actor. Unfortunately, all 3 leads of The Neverending Story quit acting, so we never got a repeat performance from them, thus the recasting in this one. Alexandra Johnes is a cute brunette with a few decent lines, but the original actress for The Childlike Empress was so striking as this sorrowful blonde girl with a tear jerking performance of pleas and wisdom, that this girl does not compare sadly. Clarissa Burt's evil sorceress Xayide is shockingly pretty and really uses her eyebrows, eyes, and smile for effectively conveying her feelings. She's a fun villainess in an otherwise lifeless movie. Martin Umbach's bird character Nimbly is really creepy and annoying in The Neverending Story II. Thomas Hill's Koreander is great as the book shoppe keeper, but underused for certain. Helena Michell is lovely as Bastian's mother Moon Child, but she should have had more flashbacks I think. In all, the hit or miss cast and dated effects with a different score really hurt The Neverending Story II, especially with the changed director that is not as talented as Wolfgang Petersen.

    A far cry from Wolfgang Petersen's original. George T. Miller's fantasy adventure drama The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter (1990) is a pale imitation of what magical charm Wolfgang Petersen captured for his classic dark fantasy film The Neverending Story (1984). While Karin Howard's script doesn't compare to the thoughtful and reflective, yet subtle writing of the first film, Michael Ende's novel gets his second half adapted for this secondary picture. It stays true to the heart of the book's idea about youth and adults needing to read, loving your parents, raising your child kindly, using your imagination, staying true to your friends, and being brave in the face of adversity. The entire idea of Bastian being able to wish Fantasia better is expanded upon here in the sequel with deeper significance on a meta level and darker for the consequences of his choices come to fruition. Chris Blunden and Peter Hollywood's slow editing lets scenes go on for too long without interesting cuts to engage viewers making 89 minutes feel like 189. David Connell's cinematography uses beautiful wide shots to capture the lovely matte paintings in the background, yet reveals the dated CGI green screen effects. Connell doesn't use a lot of striking close-ups like the first relied on for emotional cues, so this just has a lot of nice medium shots and pretty wide shots without that emotionally devastating center. The puppetry is average with less lifelike movements than the first movie. They are also not as cute as in The Neverending Story. What happened to Falkor? Robert Folk's score is fairly pretty, but very scarcely used compared to the synth heavy Giorgio Moroder score from The Neverending Story. You only get the iconic theme song at the very end. I missed the music dearly in this lackluster sequel. It's cute and fun, but too childish for the sequel in all regards. Heidi Wujek's costumes are pretty neat for the villainess' dresses though. I must say I am quite impressed by child actor Jonathan Brandis, rest in peace, as the lead actor portraying Bastian this time around. He's so real and moving here, especially during the ending embrace with his cold father, played by an awkward John Wesley Shipp, who gets better as the film progresses. Brandis was a gem of an actor with his expressive eyes and genuine emotional performance, he was skilled beyond his brief years. Kenny Morrison is fine as Atreyu with an authentic friendship depiction, but he's not as compelling as the original actor. Unfortunately, all 3 leads of The Neverending Story quit acting, so we never got a repeat performance from them, thus the recasting in this one. Alexandra Johnes is a cute brunette with a few decent lines, but the original actress for The Childlike Empress was so striking as this sorrowful blonde girl with a tear jerking performance of pleas and wisdom, that this girl does not compare sadly. Clarissa Burt's evil sorceress Xayide is shockingly pretty and really uses her eyebrows, eyes, and smile for effectively conveying her feelings. She's a fun villainess in an otherwise lifeless movie. Martin Umbach's bird character Nimbly is really creepy and annoying in The Neverending Story II. Thomas Hill's Koreander is great as the book shoppe keeper, but underused for certain. Helena Michell is lovely as Bastian's mother Moon Child, but she should have had more flashbacks I think. In all, the hit or miss cast and dated effects with a different score really hurt The Neverending Story II, especially with the changed director that is not as talented as Wolfgang Petersen.

  • Jul 03, 2020

    This is as bad as movies get, it's an abomination

    This is as bad as movies get, it's an abomination

  • Jun 20, 2020

    This is a watered down, kid friendly, Disney light version of the first film. Bastien is a complete bufoon who either makes the dumbest of wishes or doesn't make a wish when he's in danger. I know people say the third one is the worst of the trilogy but at least the third one is memorable unlike this

    This is a watered down, kid friendly, Disney light version of the first film. Bastien is a complete bufoon who either makes the dumbest of wishes or doesn't make a wish when he's in danger. I know people say the third one is the worst of the trilogy but at least the third one is memorable unlike this

  • Mar 15, 2020

    Me encanto, es una buena pelicula que encierra muchas fabulosas y misteriosas aventuras y creo que esta pelicula no se va a volver a repetir porque lo bueno quedo en esta pelicula, si la recomiendo sobretodo a los niños ya que tienen una mente donde guardan aventuras inolvidables y esta puede formar parte, es hermosa, en cuanto a los efectos especiales comprendo porque son epocas de antes, pero esta pelicula es mucho mejor que algunas de ahora y la actuacion es bellisima y pongo en ejemplo a la de Jonathan como Bastian te recordare como este niño soñador hicieron un buen trabajo. SIN DUDA UN RECUERDO INOLVIDABLE

    Me encanto, es una buena pelicula que encierra muchas fabulosas y misteriosas aventuras y creo que esta pelicula no se va a volver a repetir porque lo bueno quedo en esta pelicula, si la recomiendo sobretodo a los niños ya que tienen una mente donde guardan aventuras inolvidables y esta puede formar parte, es hermosa, en cuanto a los efectos especiales comprendo porque son epocas de antes, pero esta pelicula es mucho mejor que algunas de ahora y la actuacion es bellisima y pongo en ejemplo a la de Jonathan como Bastian te recordare como este niño soñador hicieron un buen trabajo. SIN DUDA UN RECUERDO INOLVIDABLE

  • Mar 13, 2020

    The NeverEnding Story actually exceeded my expectations. While I had problems with the framing device, I otherwise found the movie to be a really solid, well-told fantasy tale. The sequel is a tragic step down. While the new actors are trying their best with the material they have to work, the production design looks okay and I'm sure there were people involved who were trying to have the movie live up to its iconic predecessor, this next chapter drastically dumbs down the plot. After all, it's not really possible to take a movie where a boy wishes for a can of spray rather than a more practical weapon like a sword to fend off the Garthim's pathetic excuses for cousins seriously. And about the plot. Good Lord, Bastian's an idiot. He can literally wish for the entire conflict to be over but he doesn't. And while wishing causes him to gradually lose his memory, he doesn't know that! And no, I'm not just plagiarizing what I've read from TVTropes and heard on YouTube, these are things that legitimately left me stumped when I watched the movie. The tendency to fall back on generic family-friendly fantasy adventure cliches and gags that fall flat on their face don't do the movie any favours either. And there are some weird ideas that don't have any effect on the plot but are still strange nonetheless. Why do Falkor's eyes turn red in one scene as though he's possessed by the Devil in one scene? Sure, he's making it clear that he has no intention of carrying the villain on his back but nothing in the last movie suggested he could change eye colour at will to represent his emotions. On a related note, the Rock Biter had sex?! It's safe to say that, while still watchable, this movie suffered big time from having to do double duty as a sequel to a critically and commercially successful fantasy adventure and being an adaptation of the second half lf the book these films are based off of. And based off of how infamous it is, my guess is that I'm not going to have the best of experiences watching the third film, am I?

    The NeverEnding Story actually exceeded my expectations. While I had problems with the framing device, I otherwise found the movie to be a really solid, well-told fantasy tale. The sequel is a tragic step down. While the new actors are trying their best with the material they have to work, the production design looks okay and I'm sure there were people involved who were trying to have the movie live up to its iconic predecessor, this next chapter drastically dumbs down the plot. After all, it's not really possible to take a movie where a boy wishes for a can of spray rather than a more practical weapon like a sword to fend off the Garthim's pathetic excuses for cousins seriously. And about the plot. Good Lord, Bastian's an idiot. He can literally wish for the entire conflict to be over but he doesn't. And while wishing causes him to gradually lose his memory, he doesn't know that! And no, I'm not just plagiarizing what I've read from TVTropes and heard on YouTube, these are things that legitimately left me stumped when I watched the movie. The tendency to fall back on generic family-friendly fantasy adventure cliches and gags that fall flat on their face don't do the movie any favours either. And there are some weird ideas that don't have any effect on the plot but are still strange nonetheless. Why do Falkor's eyes turn red in one scene as though he's possessed by the Devil in one scene? Sure, he's making it clear that he has no intention of carrying the villain on his back but nothing in the last movie suggested he could change eye colour at will to represent his emotions. On a related note, the Rock Biter had sex?! It's safe to say that, while still watchable, this movie suffered big time from having to do double duty as a sequel to a critically and commercially successful fantasy adventure and being an adaptation of the second half lf the book these films are based off of. And based off of how infamous it is, my guess is that I'm not going to have the best of experiences watching the third film, am I?

  • Jan 17, 2020

    As a Kid born in the early 80's this was one of my first fantasy movies, I still can't believe I cried for Artax, I grew up in a farm and felt related, anyhow I lived it and still recommend it for it lit up the spark to become a reader.

    As a Kid born in the early 80's this was one of my first fantasy movies, I still can't believe I cried for Artax, I grew up in a farm and felt related, anyhow I lived it and still recommend it for it lit up the spark to become a reader.

  • Sep 27, 2019

    Not my favorite one but its still good considering its a 90s movie. So you really have to love the special effects and appreciate the efforts thay went into it.

    Not my favorite one but its still good considering its a 90s movie. So you really have to love the special effects and appreciate the efforts thay went into it.

  • Jul 25, 2019

    A decent but forgettable sequel.

    A decent but forgettable sequel.

  • Jul 15, 2019

    Why why why would you make a first film that cleaved so closely to the first third of the book, and made a bunch of money, only to then just throw the rest of the book out because "you know better"? This movie is a tragedy and a betrayal to the source material, and retained only the faintest aspect of the novel. If there was an art crimes tribunal that could be called, then aggravated felony charges against the producer/writer/director would be a slam dunk.

    Why why why would you make a first film that cleaved so closely to the first third of the book, and made a bunch of money, only to then just throw the rest of the book out because "you know better"? This movie is a tragedy and a betrayal to the source material, and retained only the faintest aspect of the novel. If there was an art crimes tribunal that could be called, then aggravated felony charges against the producer/writer/director would be a slam dunk.