The People vs. George Lucas Reviews

  • Mar 08, 2019

    This is the most insulting thing against George Lucas.

    This is the most insulting thing against George Lucas.

  • Jun 02, 2017

    Not bad to see the raving and unique compilation of fan films.

    Not bad to see the raving and unique compilation of fan films.

  • Apr 15, 2017

    While it does a good job staying objective but in doing so it feels overly sterile, not offering enough interesting points for either side. Grade: C-

    While it does a good job staying objective but in doing so it feels overly sterile, not offering enough interesting points for either side. Grade: C-

  • Luke E Super Reviewer
    Mar 25, 2017

    I love Star Wars just as much as the next person. However, unlike more than two thirds of the interviewees in this documentary I don't feel the need to put George Lucas on a pedestal as if he is the one thing everyone should worship. George Lucas is an ordinary human being who did what he did out of passion and his love for telling stories the way he wanted to, the fact of the matter is that these particular interviewees are part of a generation who experienced what they experienced and are literally 'outspoken'. I also hate the fact when someone admits they like something that someone else prominent in this documentary doesn't like they'll say "You're Wrong". Thus this so-called-documentary comes off as a biased attack at things associated with Star Wars we've all heard especially here on the internet. Worst of all I couldn't stand the film not trying to imply any prejudicial claims against George Lucas. Sure, I have my criticisms for George Lucas especially when it came to his creative decisions and times he for any lack of better words 'overstepped the line'. I find it to be an inexcusable and inhumane misinterpretation on Lucas' part who I believe deserves a lot more respect than the most vocal minority of Star Wars fans who continue to make ridiculous claims like "raped my childhood" 'pfft'. I'd rather have something on why there are generations that like what they like, not focused on a large vocal minority full of narcissistic views and opinions that think they're the center of the world more than the person they're talking about. This film is a reflection of itself; an outdated amateur display of pretentious commentary and online skits, devoid of credibility, insight or actual debate. If there're people who identify with those being focused on or interviewed in this film they might get some enjoyment out of it more than me. However, it makes fan culture look bad and hardly celebrates it enough to even recommend. Just Skip It!

    I love Star Wars just as much as the next person. However, unlike more than two thirds of the interviewees in this documentary I don't feel the need to put George Lucas on a pedestal as if he is the one thing everyone should worship. George Lucas is an ordinary human being who did what he did out of passion and his love for telling stories the way he wanted to, the fact of the matter is that these particular interviewees are part of a generation who experienced what they experienced and are literally 'outspoken'. I also hate the fact when someone admits they like something that someone else prominent in this documentary doesn't like they'll say "You're Wrong". Thus this so-called-documentary comes off as a biased attack at things associated with Star Wars we've all heard especially here on the internet. Worst of all I couldn't stand the film not trying to imply any prejudicial claims against George Lucas. Sure, I have my criticisms for George Lucas especially when it came to his creative decisions and times he for any lack of better words 'overstepped the line'. I find it to be an inexcusable and inhumane misinterpretation on Lucas' part who I believe deserves a lot more respect than the most vocal minority of Star Wars fans who continue to make ridiculous claims like "raped my childhood" 'pfft'. I'd rather have something on why there are generations that like what they like, not focused on a large vocal minority full of narcissistic views and opinions that think they're the center of the world more than the person they're talking about. This film is a reflection of itself; an outdated amateur display of pretentious commentary and online skits, devoid of credibility, insight or actual debate. If there're people who identify with those being focused on or interviewed in this film they might get some enjoyment out of it more than me. However, it makes fan culture look bad and hardly celebrates it enough to even recommend. Just Skip It!

  • Feb 23, 2017

    Good fun and excellent views from Star Wars Fan Boys

    Good fun and excellent views from Star Wars Fan Boys

  • Sep 13, 2016

    If you've always wanted to see almost two hours of people complaining about a couple movies--this is your film. If that sounds bad to you--you're absolutely right.

    If you've always wanted to see almost two hours of people complaining about a couple movies--this is your film. If that sounds bad to you--you're absolutely right.

  • Jul 06, 2016

    One of the best documentaries in the history of pop culture!

    One of the best documentaries in the history of pop culture!

  • Mar 12, 2016

    The People vs. George Lucas attempts to give a voice to the silenced Star Wars fans out there in desperate need of a platform to air 15 years worth of grievances, pent-up anger, and ... wait, aren't these people everywhere? Seriously, does anyone think "beleaguered" fanboys haven't been heard? This documentary, while quite funny, supposes that George Lucas is this oblivious behemoth with no clue how he's wronged his film's biggest fans. That just isn't the case. And though this film doubles back ultimately and gives thanks to "the creator," it, in doing so, sheepishly nullifies everything that came before it. In 1977, director George Lucas changed the film industry forever. Star Wars was more than just a movie, it became a cultural phenomenon as men, women, boys, and girls clamored into the theater to take it in time after time after time. But it wasn't just that-it was toys, clothes, books, videos, everything. Lucas was a hero to these people, but in 1997, with the theatrical release of "special editions" of all three films, he suddenly transformed into a villain. He made a series of seemingly pointless changes to the films and reacted poorly when fans spoke out. But frustration and disappointment turned to venom with the release of the three prequel films. Jar Jar Binks became a symbol of everything that was wrong with Lucas and his new creative vision, and soon, fans that would have bowed before Lucas years earlier began claiming he "raped their childhood." Following the film world so closely forces you to pay some kind of attention to fanboys and their culture. That's what makes this film feel so unnecessary. I know all the arguments-Jar Jar, Greedo, "NOOOOOOO!!!"-and most of them are valid. But people need to give it a rest and move on. We're introduced to Star Wars fan fiction-stories and films that reimagine the series in their creators' own way. These seem like great outlets to get your frustration out. But the films are Lucas's. You want to do a better job? Become as successful as him and do it yourself. You'll see how easy it is to please everyone... So by the end of the film, where exactly are we? We've had 80 minutes of George Lucas bashing followed by 10 minutes of glowing praise. There are some interesting nuggets of information along the way (I must get my hands on that Star Wars holiday special), but without a clear focus, the only thing we're left to believe is that these people have too much time on their hands. http://www.johnlikesmovies.com/people-vs-george-lucas/

    The People vs. George Lucas attempts to give a voice to the silenced Star Wars fans out there in desperate need of a platform to air 15 years worth of grievances, pent-up anger, and ... wait, aren't these people everywhere? Seriously, does anyone think "beleaguered" fanboys haven't been heard? This documentary, while quite funny, supposes that George Lucas is this oblivious behemoth with no clue how he's wronged his film's biggest fans. That just isn't the case. And though this film doubles back ultimately and gives thanks to "the creator," it, in doing so, sheepishly nullifies everything that came before it. In 1977, director George Lucas changed the film industry forever. Star Wars was more than just a movie, it became a cultural phenomenon as men, women, boys, and girls clamored into the theater to take it in time after time after time. But it wasn't just that-it was toys, clothes, books, videos, everything. Lucas was a hero to these people, but in 1997, with the theatrical release of "special editions" of all three films, he suddenly transformed into a villain. He made a series of seemingly pointless changes to the films and reacted poorly when fans spoke out. But frustration and disappointment turned to venom with the release of the three prequel films. Jar Jar Binks became a symbol of everything that was wrong with Lucas and his new creative vision, and soon, fans that would have bowed before Lucas years earlier began claiming he "raped their childhood." Following the film world so closely forces you to pay some kind of attention to fanboys and their culture. That's what makes this film feel so unnecessary. I know all the arguments-Jar Jar, Greedo, "NOOOOOOO!!!"-and most of them are valid. But people need to give it a rest and move on. We're introduced to Star Wars fan fiction-stories and films that reimagine the series in their creators' own way. These seem like great outlets to get your frustration out. But the films are Lucas's. You want to do a better job? Become as successful as him and do it yourself. You'll see how easy it is to please everyone... So by the end of the film, where exactly are we? We've had 80 minutes of George Lucas bashing followed by 10 minutes of glowing praise. There are some interesting nuggets of information along the way (I must get my hands on that Star Wars holiday special), but without a clear focus, the only thing we're left to believe is that these people have too much time on their hands. http://www.johnlikesmovies.com/people-vs-george-lucas/

  • Feb 22, 2016

    Just like George Lucas, this documentary about his greatest work and biggest fall, is extremely controversial. I say it is a must see for every StarWars fan.

    Just like George Lucas, this documentary about his greatest work and biggest fall, is extremely controversial. I say it is a must see for every StarWars fan.

  • Jan 16, 2016

    Often funny and sometimes poignant, this perfectly paced documentary is unbiased and provides a lot of interesting thoughts: a must for any Star Wars fan.

    Often funny and sometimes poignant, this perfectly paced documentary is unbiased and provides a lot of interesting thoughts: a must for any Star Wars fan.