The Song of Lunch (2010) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Song of Lunch (2010)

The Song of Lunch (2010)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

This hour-long installment of the PBS series Masterpiece Contemporary stars Emma Thompson and Alan Rickman, and constitutes an adaptation of Christopher Reid's narrative poem of the same title. Like its source material, the film follows the saga of a nameless book editor (Rickman), meeting his ex-girlfriend (Thompson) a decade and a half after their initial break-up. They join one another for a nostalgic lunch at a chic SoHo restaurant that figured prominently into their relationship; she has become the society wife of a French writer, and now resides in Paris; he, on the other hand, has failed as a belletrist, fell into a mundane, unsatisfying publishing job, and pines for the loss of the love affair. Day in and day out, it seems, he can't shake his feelings of resentment and hostility about aging. Though the reunion begins peacefully and amicably, it soon descends and degenerates into a vitriolic parade of insults and accusations. This marked the first reunion of Thompson and Rickman since their roles as husband and wife in the 2003 romantic comedy Love Actually. ~ Nathan Southern, Rovi

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Critic Reviews for The Song of Lunch

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Audience Reviews for The Song of Lunch

This one was full of surprises, but sadly, few of them were good ones. At least at 50 minutes duration, the pain did not last long, but even so, it seemed longer than its running length. A BBC TV production means of course impeccable production values and I am normally a huge fan of Alan Rickman and Emma Thompson. It was the story and the presentation that were lacking. Most of the film consisted of a voice over narration of what was going though his mind through the course of the encounter. Very little action can still be engrossing if the conversation sparkles. The description of this calls it a poetic monologue. I call it pretentious prattle. I will give it three stars, but only because of Emma. Without her it would have been an unmitigated disaster.

Mark Abell
Mark Abell

Super Reviewer

½

The Song of Lunch is a poignant and bittersweet look at a failed relationship. This is a short film - it's actually an hour-long installment from the PBS series Masterpiece Contemporary - and told largely in poetic monologue from the perspective of Alan Rickman's unnamed character as he and his ex-lover (Emma Thompson) reunite for lunch fifteen years after their break-up. This is a delicious example of what can happen when you mix good writing with talented actors such as Rickman and Thompson. It is a wonderfully controlled and understated film that's peppered with the most minute details (the sound of glasses clinking; the way she chews her food) -- all of which bring their lunch to life. I also enjoy the transition Rickman's character makes, as it allows us to better appreciate what these two people were like fifteen years ago, and where they've been since then.

Kumiko Ide
Kumiko Ide
½

Not your typical film but interesting. A bittersweet tale of lost love. Nice to see Rickman and Thompson working together again.

Sunil Jawahir
Sunil Jawahir

Super Reviewer

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