The Still Life Reviews

  • Mar 07, 2008

    great scenes, great acting, great music

    great scenes, great acting, great music

  • Mar 07, 2008

    An interesting idea - an artist hits the big time and is plagued by emotional distress having lost touch with his original artistic intentions. The metaphor isn't exactly subtle - he has to literally destroy his own creations in order to retain his reputation as a 'destructionist'. The plot is intriguing (if a little naive and slightly under-written - sorry Joel!) and there is certainly directorial flair and a clear passion for film-making. The film is filtered with cameos from various members of the music industry. I'm not sure what further comment I could pass on that, suffice to say that Jason Barry is the only 'actor' in the film. He plays the role passionately and with conviction considering what and whom he has to work with. Having said that, Rachel Miner was tolerable if only for her ability to cry rivers of tears for an hour and a half. Kudos. My interest in independent film continues to provide me with a range of produce. Unfortunately this film, with its industry cameos and attempt at stylised filming coupled with casting via bra-size rather than talent, feels as though it's striving to be mainstream when it had the promise to be so much more.

    An interesting idea - an artist hits the big time and is plagued by emotional distress having lost touch with his original artistic intentions. The metaphor isn't exactly subtle - he has to literally destroy his own creations in order to retain his reputation as a 'destructionist'. The plot is intriguing (if a little naive and slightly under-written - sorry Joel!) and there is certainly directorial flair and a clear passion for film-making. The film is filtered with cameos from various members of the music industry. I'm not sure what further comment I could pass on that, suffice to say that Jason Barry is the only 'actor' in the film. He plays the role passionately and with conviction considering what and whom he has to work with. Having said that, Rachel Miner was tolerable if only for her ability to cry rivers of tears for an hour and a half. Kudos. My interest in independent film continues to provide me with a range of produce. Unfortunately this film, with its industry cameos and attempt at stylised filming coupled with casting via bra-size rather than talent, feels as though it's striving to be mainstream when it had the promise to be so much more.