The Stoneraft Reviews

  • May 11, 2011

    Ebert rightly calls this a low key disaster film, but it is also fantasy, magical realism, a political fable, and an allegory about Spain and Portugal in the context of an impending EU expansion in 2004, though the book on which it was based was written around the time that Spain and Portugal joined the EU in 1986. The Iberian peninsula breaks away from Europe, and heads due West, towards North America (via the Azores). The movie, like the book written by Nobel Prize winning Jose Saramago, is open to a number of interpretations, but focuses on the response of individuals to these tremendous political changes. Each of the five Iberians examines a curious talent or ability about themselves that they do not fully understand. One of the strongest points of the movie is the setup, which makes the break of Iberia from the continent believable. Then as our travelers explore their talents and travel Iberia in search of a location to wait out the impending crash with the Azores, we are free to explore with them as they struggle to understand themselves and each other. Half of the fun of this movie, if you haven't read the book, is waiting for the next unexpected aspect of a talent or ability to unfold. If you have read the book, you might want to make sure you have a few years under your belt before turning down the house lights, and settling in with popcorn.

    Ebert rightly calls this a low key disaster film, but it is also fantasy, magical realism, a political fable, and an allegory about Spain and Portugal in the context of an impending EU expansion in 2004, though the book on which it was based was written around the time that Spain and Portugal joined the EU in 1986. The Iberian peninsula breaks away from Europe, and heads due West, towards North America (via the Azores). The movie, like the book written by Nobel Prize winning Jose Saramago, is open to a number of interpretations, but focuses on the response of individuals to these tremendous political changes. Each of the five Iberians examines a curious talent or ability about themselves that they do not fully understand. One of the strongest points of the movie is the setup, which makes the break of Iberia from the continent believable. Then as our travelers explore their talents and travel Iberia in search of a location to wait out the impending crash with the Azores, we are free to explore with them as they struggle to understand themselves and each other. Half of the fun of this movie, if you haven't read the book, is waiting for the next unexpected aspect of a talent or ability to unfold. If you have read the book, you might want to make sure you have a few years under your belt before turning down the house lights, and settling in with popcorn.

  • Jan 02, 2011

    Ebert rightly calls this a low key disaster film, but it is also fantasy, magical realism, a political fable, and an allegory about Spain and Portugal in the context of an impending EU expansion in 2004, though the book on which it was based was written around the time that Spain and Portugal joined the EU in 1986. The Iberian peninsula breaks away from Europe, and heads due West, towards North America (via the Azores). The movie, like the book written by Nobel Prize winning Jose Saramago, is open to a number of interpretations, but focuses on the response of individuals to these tremendous political changes. Each of the five Iberians examines a curious talent or ability about themselves that they do not fully understand. One of the strongest points of the movie is the setup, which makes the break of Iberia from the continent believable. Then as our travelers explore their talents and travel Iberia in search of a location to wait out the impending crash with the Azores, we are free to explore with them as they struggle to understand themselves and each other. Half of the fun of this movie, if you haven't read the book, is waiting for the next unexpected aspect of a talent or ability to unfold. If you have read the book, you might want to make sure you have a few years under your belt before turning down the house lights, and settling in with popcorn.

    Ebert rightly calls this a low key disaster film, but it is also fantasy, magical realism, a political fable, and an allegory about Spain and Portugal in the context of an impending EU expansion in 2004, though the book on which it was based was written around the time that Spain and Portugal joined the EU in 1986. The Iberian peninsula breaks away from Europe, and heads due West, towards North America (via the Azores). The movie, like the book written by Nobel Prize winning Jose Saramago, is open to a number of interpretations, but focuses on the response of individuals to these tremendous political changes. Each of the five Iberians examines a curious talent or ability about themselves that they do not fully understand. One of the strongest points of the movie is the setup, which makes the break of Iberia from the continent believable. Then as our travelers explore their talents and travel Iberia in search of a location to wait out the impending crash with the Azores, we are free to explore with them as they struggle to understand themselves and each other. Half of the fun of this movie, if you haven't read the book, is waiting for the next unexpected aspect of a talent or ability to unfold. If you have read the book, you might want to make sure you have a few years under your belt before turning down the house lights, and settling in with popcorn.

  • May 27, 2010

    (***): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img] Interesting end of the world film. I enjoyed its pace and really got involved with the characters.

    (***): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img] Interesting end of the world film. I enjoyed its pace and really got involved with the characters.

  • May 27, 2010

    pretty interesting and engaging, cool idea and effects....would most likely have been better had i known much about european geography....

    pretty interesting and engaging, cool idea and effects....would most likely have been better had i known much about european geography....