The Tree of Life Reviews

  • 6d ago

    Nevertheless, this movie is a unique and amazing experience. "The Tree of Life" is a movie about such things, about maturity, nature, sincerity, God, emotions, family, remorse, forgiveness, death, and others. Presented with artistic patterns, this is like an experimental film. Like listening to Radiohead songs or else. It's a rare experience, a rare cinema, so much specialness in this film and I expect films like this again. This movie is just too personal for us.

    Nevertheless, this movie is a unique and amazing experience. "The Tree of Life" is a movie about such things, about maturity, nature, sincerity, God, emotions, family, remorse, forgiveness, death, and others. Presented with artistic patterns, this is like an experimental film. Like listening to Radiohead songs or else. It's a rare experience, a rare cinema, so much specialness in this film and I expect films like this again. This movie is just too personal for us.

  • Jul 07, 2019

    An emotional journey of spirituality, grieving, and hope. Terrence Malick's indie drama The Tree of Life (2011) is an experiment in depicting life philosophies on coping with loss, appreciating family, and finding hope for living. Malick's writing takes you from a man's disaffected maturity back to his troubled childhood rife with loss, control, and frustration. I love how Malick draws parallels between a boy grieving for his dead brother and a grown man unsure of how to feel about his past loss alongside his similarly grief stricken parents. It's a beautiful film, though dense with art house space sequences. I should mention that these long passages of colorful CGI and natural beauty take you on a journey. Terrence Malick inserts a spiritual odyssey around the universe right into the middle of The Tree of Life. This always starts with one of his characters asking God, "Why?" did their son or brother die. It's a captivating series of visual metaphors for life moving on, humanity being only a speck in the grand scheme of the universe, and life containing more beauty than pain. If you can endure these significant portions of stunning imagery, then The Tree of Life is incredibly rewarding for its patient viewers. The following dramatic tale is full of mesmerizing performances and gripping storytelling. Malick's direction is focused for how jarring and experimental the editing is in The Tree of Life. Malick tells you the story of a family grieving over a generation with jump cuts back and forth in time to provide increasingly detailed accounts of these strict, yet loving parents and their adventurous and hurt children. Malick's direction is nothing short of masterful ambition brought to life with Emmanuel Lubezki's cinematography. Each shot is an intimate, moving moment of deep reflection and emotional clarity. The Tree of Life reveals more with each frame and I found it fascinating. Alexandre Desplat's score is an epic classical composition. The heavy, serious tone is matched by Desplat's ultra dark music. I think Desplat has continued to astound me with his magical style that captures wonder and fear alike. Brad Pitt is marvelous as a strict and commanding father named Mr. O'Brien. His meticulous nature delivers a harsh performance and a hard persona towards his children. Pitt is perfect as the stern husband and brutal father, whose highly regimented orders revolve around his children's lives. Pitt interestingly plays his character as a loving, yet controlling father, whose passion for music offsets his remorse for not being more successful. Brad Pitt astonished me in The Tree of Life with his subtle acting in his nuanced role as a complex father figure. Pitt kills it alongside Jessica Chastain as Mrs. O'Brien. She portraying a deep sorrow conveying her character's grief over her dead son, misery in her overbearing marriage, remorse for not standing up for her children or herself against her husband, and a loving attitude towards her children and husband despite their issues. Sean Penn is excellent as the grown up Jack. His display of uncertainty towards his own future and depression caused by his family's past is palpable. Penn is capable of such nuanced roles that he impresses me more with each role. Lastly, the three boys in The Tree of Life all engage you with their portrayal of childhood wonder and anguish. Hunter McCracken, Tye Sheridan, and Laramie Eppler all have potential as actors given their powerful acting in Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life. In all, The Tree of Life is a dense and intricate tale of love over time that is genuinely moving. Terrence Malick's prowess as a top notch director is proven yet again.

    An emotional journey of spirituality, grieving, and hope. Terrence Malick's indie drama The Tree of Life (2011) is an experiment in depicting life philosophies on coping with loss, appreciating family, and finding hope for living. Malick's writing takes you from a man's disaffected maturity back to his troubled childhood rife with loss, control, and frustration. I love how Malick draws parallels between a boy grieving for his dead brother and a grown man unsure of how to feel about his past loss alongside his similarly grief stricken parents. It's a beautiful film, though dense with art house space sequences. I should mention that these long passages of colorful CGI and natural beauty take you on a journey. Terrence Malick inserts a spiritual odyssey around the universe right into the middle of The Tree of Life. This always starts with one of his characters asking God, "Why?" did their son or brother die. It's a captivating series of visual metaphors for life moving on, humanity being only a speck in the grand scheme of the universe, and life containing more beauty than pain. If you can endure these significant portions of stunning imagery, then The Tree of Life is incredibly rewarding for its patient viewers. The following dramatic tale is full of mesmerizing performances and gripping storytelling. Malick's direction is focused for how jarring and experimental the editing is in The Tree of Life. Malick tells you the story of a family grieving over a generation with jump cuts back and forth in time to provide increasingly detailed accounts of these strict, yet loving parents and their adventurous and hurt children. Malick's direction is nothing short of masterful ambition brought to life with Emmanuel Lubezki's cinematography. Each shot is an intimate, moving moment of deep reflection and emotional clarity. The Tree of Life reveals more with each frame and I found it fascinating. Alexandre Desplat's score is an epic classical composition. The heavy, serious tone is matched by Desplat's ultra dark music. I think Desplat has continued to astound me with his magical style that captures wonder and fear alike. Brad Pitt is marvelous as a strict and commanding father named Mr. O'Brien. His meticulous nature delivers a harsh performance and a hard persona towards his children. Pitt is perfect as the stern husband and brutal father, whose highly regimented orders revolve around his children's lives. Pitt interestingly plays his character as a loving, yet controlling father, whose passion for music offsets his remorse for not being more successful. Brad Pitt astonished me in The Tree of Life with his subtle acting in his nuanced role as a complex father figure. Pitt kills it alongside Jessica Chastain as Mrs. O'Brien. She portraying a deep sorrow conveying her character's grief over her dead son, misery in her overbearing marriage, remorse for not standing up for her children or herself against her husband, and a loving attitude towards her children and husband despite their issues. Sean Penn is excellent as the grown up Jack. His display of uncertainty towards his own future and depression caused by his family's past is palpable. Penn is capable of such nuanced roles that he impresses me more with each role. Lastly, the three boys in The Tree of Life all engage you with their portrayal of childhood wonder and anguish. Hunter McCracken, Tye Sheridan, and Laramie Eppler all have potential as actors given their powerful acting in Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life. In all, The Tree of Life is a dense and intricate tale of love over time that is genuinely moving. Terrence Malick's prowess as a top notch director is proven yet again.

  • May 30, 2019

    La película más ilógica, irracional, absurda, aburrida, desquiciante e insalvable que he visto y veré en esta vida. Lo único interesante, la dirección fotográfica. Gracias Malick por haberme hecho desperdiciar 139 minutos de mi vida. The most illogical, irrational, absurd, boring, unsettling and insurmountable film that I have seen and will see in this life. The only interesting thing is the photography direction. Thanks Malick for making me waste 139 minutes of my life.

    La película más ilógica, irracional, absurda, aburrida, desquiciante e insalvable que he visto y veré en esta vida. Lo único interesante, la dirección fotográfica. Gracias Malick por haberme hecho desperdiciar 139 minutos de mi vida. The most illogical, irrational, absurd, boring, unsettling and insurmountable film that I have seen and will see in this life. The only interesting thing is the photography direction. Thanks Malick for making me waste 139 minutes of my life.

  • Apr 19, 2019

    This is Terrence Malick's most ambitious film spanning the history of time and concerning both the conception of the Universe, the evolution of it and the struggles that human's face when tortured by the indifference of nature. The centre of the story is a stand-in for a young Terence Malick as he struggles with his relationship with his brothers, his emotionally cold Father and himself. Intercut with this are scenes of the Universe being formed, work overseen by Douglas Trumbull of Blade Runner (1982) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) fame, as we seen dinosaurs dying and microbes floating through the ocean. The film does not entirely achieve tying these two parts together but it's ambition is admirable and the end result is more stunning than most films being released today. At 2 hours and 19 minutes the film is extremely lengthy and with scenes of stars exploding and jellyfish killing each other feeling like they go on for 30 minutes it is easy to see why Malick's languorous pacing is not for everybody. The New World (2005) stretches for over 2 hours but in both films it feels earned because although Malick is telling a story almost entirely through montage it does feel like there is an interesting story present, that of a young boy's difficult childhood, unlike Malick's more recent work, Knight of Cups (2014), in particular that is vapid, soulless and interminable. Of course capturing Malick's vision in his slow, observational style is going to take a considerable amount of time and the film is an enjoyable, immersive experience if you give yourself over to it. Trumbull's talent is on full display here as the scenes asteroids hitting the atmosphere of planets and dinosaurs evolving are visually gorgeous and have a texture to them that other special-effects heavy films, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, lack creating convincing images of evolution. The use of dramatic opera music over these dramatic montages can feel a tad over the top at times as silence could simply be more effective as we marvel at the glorious images that Trumbull has digitally created. Overbearing music is a signature of Malick's however and I understand that others enjoy it and see it as a perfect accompaniment to Malick's over the top visual style. Cinematography is the obvious star as it is with any Malick film. The shots are peak-Malick here with Jessica Chastain's loving Mother shot with an ethereal light behind her and one sequence in which she is literally dancing in the air. The light drenches every frame and the muted color palate adopted in the childhood sections of the film helps to create a nostalgic tone. Brad Pitt's Father is always shot from below, because he is an intimidating figure, and one touching moment in which our protagonist and his Father hug shows them on equal footing for once. This subtle attention-to-detail allows Malick to show not tell, instead of simply expositing in voiceover, nice moments of subtlety within a very obvious film. The acting in the film takes a back seat to the cinematography but Chastain, Pitt and the young Hunter McCracken in the lead role manage to leave lasting impressions. Chastain gets the showiest role as she photogenically suffers and serenely watches over the household, this was one of her breakout roles and it is clear why she still works steadily, 8 years later. Pitt is successful at portraying a loving but not outwardly expressive Father however it is harder to forget that he is movie star Brad Pitt. McCracken is fabulous as an angry, confused child facing a world that he struggles to understand with new concepts like sexuality, spirituality and love. Sean Penn is horrible, as usual, in his role as the grown-up version of the protagonist and it was a smart move by Malick to almost entirely cut him out of the film but I wish this strand of the story had not been included altogether. This is one of Malick's most iconic films and possibly his most famous next to Badlands (1973) and Days of Heaven (1978) and if you intend to jump into his filmography this is a must-watch. It is not as accessible as his other work, I would suggest watching Badlands (1973) or To the Wonder (2012) to figure out whether you enjoy Malick's filmmaking style before jumping into 2 and a half hours of it. I personally enjoyed the experience of watching this film and I believe that this is one of Malick's finest films. Placing it fourth was difficult because it is such a grand vision but it's shortcomings caused it to have less impact than his other, near-perfect films.

    This is Terrence Malick's most ambitious film spanning the history of time and concerning both the conception of the Universe, the evolution of it and the struggles that human's face when tortured by the indifference of nature. The centre of the story is a stand-in for a young Terence Malick as he struggles with his relationship with his brothers, his emotionally cold Father and himself. Intercut with this are scenes of the Universe being formed, work overseen by Douglas Trumbull of Blade Runner (1982) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) fame, as we seen dinosaurs dying and microbes floating through the ocean. The film does not entirely achieve tying these two parts together but it's ambition is admirable and the end result is more stunning than most films being released today. At 2 hours and 19 minutes the film is extremely lengthy and with scenes of stars exploding and jellyfish killing each other feeling like they go on for 30 minutes it is easy to see why Malick's languorous pacing is not for everybody. The New World (2005) stretches for over 2 hours but in both films it feels earned because although Malick is telling a story almost entirely through montage it does feel like there is an interesting story present, that of a young boy's difficult childhood, unlike Malick's more recent work, Knight of Cups (2014), in particular that is vapid, soulless and interminable. Of course capturing Malick's vision in his slow, observational style is going to take a considerable amount of time and the film is an enjoyable, immersive experience if you give yourself over to it. Trumbull's talent is on full display here as the scenes asteroids hitting the atmosphere of planets and dinosaurs evolving are visually gorgeous and have a texture to them that other special-effects heavy films, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, lack creating convincing images of evolution. The use of dramatic opera music over these dramatic montages can feel a tad over the top at times as silence could simply be more effective as we marvel at the glorious images that Trumbull has digitally created. Overbearing music is a signature of Malick's however and I understand that others enjoy it and see it as a perfect accompaniment to Malick's over the top visual style. Cinematography is the obvious star as it is with any Malick film. The shots are peak-Malick here with Jessica Chastain's loving Mother shot with an ethereal light behind her and one sequence in which she is literally dancing in the air. The light drenches every frame and the muted color palate adopted in the childhood sections of the film helps to create a nostalgic tone. Brad Pitt's Father is always shot from below, because he is an intimidating figure, and one touching moment in which our protagonist and his Father hug shows them on equal footing for once. This subtle attention-to-detail allows Malick to show not tell, instead of simply expositing in voiceover, nice moments of subtlety within a very obvious film. The acting in the film takes a back seat to the cinematography but Chastain, Pitt and the young Hunter McCracken in the lead role manage to leave lasting impressions. Chastain gets the showiest role as she photogenically suffers and serenely watches over the household, this was one of her breakout roles and it is clear why she still works steadily, 8 years later. Pitt is successful at portraying a loving but not outwardly expressive Father however it is harder to forget that he is movie star Brad Pitt. McCracken is fabulous as an angry, confused child facing a world that he struggles to understand with new concepts like sexuality, spirituality and love. Sean Penn is horrible, as usual, in his role as the grown-up version of the protagonist and it was a smart move by Malick to almost entirely cut him out of the film but I wish this strand of the story had not been included altogether. This is one of Malick's most iconic films and possibly his most famous next to Badlands (1973) and Days of Heaven (1978) and if you intend to jump into his filmography this is a must-watch. It is not as accessible as his other work, I would suggest watching Badlands (1973) or To the Wonder (2012) to figure out whether you enjoy Malick's filmmaking style before jumping into 2 and a half hours of it. I personally enjoyed the experience of watching this film and I believe that this is one of Malick's finest films. Placing it fourth was difficult because it is such a grand vision but it's shortcomings caused it to have less impact than his other, near-perfect films.

  • Apr 09, 2019

    Breathtaking. Terrence Malik proves his an extraordinary director and storyteller, with philosophical introspections, analogies, and the beautifull cinematography of emanuel lubezki this film stands in another level.

    Breathtaking. Terrence Malik proves his an extraordinary director and storyteller, with philosophical introspections, analogies, and the beautifull cinematography of emanuel lubezki this film stands in another level.

  • Mar 18, 2019

    the previously unreleased and handsomely filmed portion of benjamin durden's stay here on earth. but seriously: "the only way to be happy is to love. unless you love, your life will flash by. do good to them. wonder. hope. brother. keep us, guide us... till the end of time." a more perfect ending could not be engineered, but, noooo, let's keep going! sheesh... i stopped a few minutes after that. two stars for photography.

    the previously unreleased and handsomely filmed portion of benjamin durden's stay here on earth. but seriously: "the only way to be happy is to love. unless you love, your life will flash by. do good to them. wonder. hope. brother. keep us, guide us... till the end of time." a more perfect ending could not be engineered, but, noooo, let's keep going! sheesh... i stopped a few minutes after that. two stars for photography.

  • Mar 12, 2019

    Ever since being bored to tears and/or rage while watching my last Terrance Mallick film, The Thing Red Line, I haven't risked watching another. Until now. A lot of praise was heaped upon The Tree Of Life, so I gave it a shot. Trademark Mallick: aimless plot, incoherent editing, and endless shots of nothing. It reminded me a lot of Melancholia, anther artistic piece of crap that made film critics cream themselves, yet entertained no one. Rating: F

    Ever since being bored to tears and/or rage while watching my last Terrance Mallick film, The Thing Red Line, I haven't risked watching another. Until now. A lot of praise was heaped upon The Tree Of Life, so I gave it a shot. Trademark Mallick: aimless plot, incoherent editing, and endless shots of nothing. It reminded me a lot of Melancholia, anther artistic piece of crap that made film critics cream themselves, yet entertained no one. Rating: F

  • Feb 18, 2019

    1.5/5. The Tree of Life has solid visuals and cinematography, plus a decent performance from Brad Pitt, but this movie is extremely pretentious and incredibly boring.

    1.5/5. The Tree of Life has solid visuals and cinematography, plus a decent performance from Brad Pitt, but this movie is extremely pretentious and incredibly boring.

  • Feb 18, 2019

    Gentle , pleasant , risky , expressive , bold and real . This movie is definitely unique because the director gave himself the freedom to tell the story the way he felt he needed to and it was brilliant

    Gentle , pleasant , risky , expressive , bold and real . This movie is definitely unique because the director gave himself the freedom to tell the story the way he felt he needed to and it was brilliant

  • Jan 26, 2019

    Nothing like stating the obvious as serious as you can get, combined with a life-time supply of space music.

    Nothing like stating the obvious as serious as you can get, combined with a life-time supply of space music.