The Truth (1960)

The Truth (1960)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

The main attraction in this downbeat, routine drama by director Henri-Georges Clouzot is Brigitte Bardot as lead character Dominique, a small-town woman who is undone by big-city life and inner-city morals. Told in a series of flashbacks during a murder trial, the complicated plot begins when Dominique goes to Paris and launches into various affairs with Left Bank intellectual types. After a brief fling with her sister's boyfriend, they quarrel and split. Time goes by and he scores in his career as a conductor while she deteriorates into prostitution. Fate tragically brings them together one more time when Dominique realizes she always loved him, in spite of everything.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Art House & International , Drama , Mystery & Suspense
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
Runtime:
Studio:
Han Productions

Cast

Brigitte Bardot
as Dominique Marceau
Charles Vanel
as Master Guérin
Paul Meurisse
as Master Éparvier
Marie-José Nat
as Annie Marceau
Sami Frey
as Gilbert Tellier
Louis Seigner
as President of the Court
Jacqueline Porel
as Defense Lawyer
Christian Lude
as Colonel
Suzy Willy
as Mme. Marceau
René Blancard
as Attorney General
Fernand Ledoux
as Court Physician
Louis Arbessier
as Conservatory Professor
Jacques Perrin
as Jérôme
Claude Berri
as Georges
Jacques Hilling
as 'Sputnik' Client
Colette Castel
as Young Lawyer
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Critic Reviews for The Truth

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Audience Reviews for The Truth

Henri-Georges Clouzot never fails to slap his audience in the face by showing them the bleakness of the moral universe they seek to affirm. In that sense, he is the opposite of Hollywood, even though he uses very succesfully the genres, tropes and techniques that American cinema uses. In La Verite the genre he uses is the court drama and he does it masterfully; however, the finalle does not resolve the tensions of the plot in a morally upbeat way, where everything returns in order (moral and social). On the contrary, the film ends with an unresolved conflict - that between the true, passionate feelings of Brigitte Bardot's character towards the man she loved and killed and the cold, moralizing juctice who lacks understanding. Clouzot never brings us too close to his characters, never tries to make us identify totally with them as we would in a Hollywood court drama in which we would know where we stand in relation to them, but his cool eye and distance gives the spotlight to the social conflict itself: the young vs the old, the free sexuality vs the moral uptightedness, the bohemian vs the employed, true love vs fake love, good-parenting vs bad-parenting etc. Clouzot is a satirist deep down; he delights in degrading the noble picture society makes of itself and he does it with deadly seriousness. But, no matter how serious he is as a filmmaker, he is also very playful, making his films full of small, amusing details, such as the security-lady who comes as a witness claiming she always checks who passes from the entrance into the building. The most impressive thing in La Verite is its sincere portrayal of youth culture, of new sexual ethics emerging at the time and the bohemian Parisian life. Clouzot neither glorifies these characters, as some films of the Nouvelle Vague did, nor condemns them. Closing, the performances are excellent and Brigitte Bardot is exceptional here.

George Matalliotakis
George Matalliotakis

Super Reviewer

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