The Two of Us (1967)

The Two of Us (1967)

TOMATOMETER

——

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

The Two of Us Photos

Movie Info

Having been forced into minor parts for several years by a debilitating illness, veteran film actor Michel Simon made a triumphant return to leading roles in the charming, poignant The Two of Us (Le Vieil Homme et L'Enfant). Simon plays a likeable old soak with one significant character flaw: he is a flagrant anti-Semite. During the Nazi occupation of Paris, 8-year-old Jewish lad Alain Cohen is sent to the country, there to live with the parents of his family's Catholic friends. One of those parents is, inevitably, Simon. Taking a liking to Alain, and unaware that the boy is Jewish, Simon attempts to introduce the lad to the doctrine of anti-Semitism. The boy plays along with the old man, teasing him about his prejudices. Despite their obvious philosophical differences, Simon and Alain form a strong and affectionate bond. Director Claude Berri, whose films have often touched upon the Jewish experience in France, once more draws from his own experiences to weave a sensitive, seriocomic scenario.
Rating:
R
Genre:
Art House & International , Comedy , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Rialto

Cast

Michel Simon
as Gramps
Alain Cohen
as Claude
Luce Fabiole
as Granny
Zorica Lozic
as Claude's Mother
Roger Carel
as Victor
Charles Denner
as Claude's Father
Aline Bertrand
as Raymonde
Marco Perrin
as The Priest
Didier Perret
as Dinou's brother
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for The Two of Us

All Critics (8) | Top Critics (4)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | February 10, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

Overall the acting as well as the cinematography is a treat.

Full Review… | September 9, 2005
Miami Herald
Top Critic

A heart-warming movie that showcases one of the last performances of the great Michel Simon.

Full Review… | August 25, 2005
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

You're unaware of the film's power until the ending (well-earned and happy) hits you with an unexpected well of emotion.

Full Review… | July 15, 2005
Seattle Times
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | June 3, 2005
New York Times
Top Critic

Some may find Berri's portrait of provincial France and its prejudices too loving, but it has the ring of a truth that escapes ideologies.

Full Review… | May 24, 2005
Village Voice
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for The Two of Us

½

Charming, "human" film. Michael Simon is fantastic, as is Alain Cohen who gives one of the best and most natural child performances I've ever seen. Grandpa is such an interesting and endearing character despite his obvious flaws and ignorance. But he feels like a real person with Simon's performance and the movie showing his flaws and shortcomings along with his charm. Grandpa and Claude are great together, and the movie plays with your expectations. I'm still a little surprised there wasn't a scene of Grandpa finding out Claude was Jewish. Claude Berri portrays a different aspect of occupied France that I hadn't seen before, and I am pretty blown away by it.

Matt Heiser
Matt Heiser
½

Produced twenty-five years ago, "The Two of Us" is Claude Berri's semi-autobiographical valentine to a painful, yet beautiful chapter of his childhood. Sent to live with an older Christian couple in the French countryside in 1944, a young, precocious, yet wise Jewish boy experiences a variety of events which shape his life. The special bond forged between him and "Grandpa," an anti-Semite, to whom he teaches tolerance, deeply touches the heart and makes this an important Holocaust film, well worth your attention. Performances are uniformly excellent. Subtitles are clear, although flashed a bit too rapidly for my taste -- a small price for viewing this cinematic gem.

Jerry Kane
Jerry Kane

A young Jewish boy during WWII France is sent to the countryside for safety, landing in the home of a Petain supporter. Background: I recorded this off of TCM and had never heard of it prior. My viewing was without prior bias. Observations: 1) This is so charming, a story of innocence, and a great budding friendship. 2) How Michel Simon (Grandpa) pulled off making an old-fashioned bigot into a lovable lug is amazing. Kudos. 3) The war is kept at a distance, allowing the focus to be on childhood. 4) The ending could've went two ways, and the simpler of the two was selected. Maybe in keeping with the light-hearted tone of the film. I still wonder "what if?" Why I gave it a 60%? Simon as the best Grampa character I've seen recently.

Lane B
Lane B

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