The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (Les Parapluies de Cherbourg) Reviews

  • 2d ago

    Great classic all time movie!!!

    Great classic all time movie!!!

  • Jan 04, 2021

    Alright so the technicolor looks amazing. But… this movie is a musical and it seems like it might be really cheesy and gay lol. I really hope the whole fucking movie isn't like this. I mean can't they just talk normally without singing? That's seems really silly to me. Like why'd they have to make a musical out of the whole damn thing? Why not just segments like Sound of Music? Catherine Deneuve is so pretty. Her performance was one of a kind. I feel like I would've liked the movie a lot more if they weren't singing all the goddamn time lol. The story itself is good, it's interesting and somewhat sad and dark with themes like having to go off to war and leaving the girl you love behind and not knowing what to do expecting a child and the father not being around. It is impressive though that they had that much music to go along for the whole movie. And that score at the very end of the movie with all the strings was so hauntingly beautiful. It definitely captured the feeling of heartbreak and loss of not being able to be with your true lover but also being able to move on (because one must move on). This is like one of the saddest and most depressing musicals I've ever seen lmao. Goddamn that was a sad story. At least they were each able to move on even though they're probably still hurting inside forever. Moral of the story here is: fuck war. They break people, split people apart, kill people. I don't know if I'd watch it again even though I liked it and I was thoroughly entertained. It's just too heartbreaking and sad and they sing the whole damn time lol. Other than that, I thought the story impacted me on a deep level.

    Alright so the technicolor looks amazing. But… this movie is a musical and it seems like it might be really cheesy and gay lol. I really hope the whole fucking movie isn't like this. I mean can't they just talk normally without singing? That's seems really silly to me. Like why'd they have to make a musical out of the whole damn thing? Why not just segments like Sound of Music? Catherine Deneuve is so pretty. Her performance was one of a kind. I feel like I would've liked the movie a lot more if they weren't singing all the goddamn time lol. The story itself is good, it's interesting and somewhat sad and dark with themes like having to go off to war and leaving the girl you love behind and not knowing what to do expecting a child and the father not being around. It is impressive though that they had that much music to go along for the whole movie. And that score at the very end of the movie with all the strings was so hauntingly beautiful. It definitely captured the feeling of heartbreak and loss of not being able to be with your true lover but also being able to move on (because one must move on). This is like one of the saddest and most depressing musicals I've ever seen lmao. Goddamn that was a sad story. At least they were each able to move on even though they're probably still hurting inside forever. Moral of the story here is: fuck war. They break people, split people apart, kill people. I don't know if I'd watch it again even though I liked it and I was thoroughly entertained. It's just too heartbreaking and sad and they sing the whole damn time lol. Other than that, I thought the story impacted me on a deep level.

  • Sep 12, 2020

    I wanted to love "Umbrellas", but I was incredibly disappointed in this film. I rented it mainly because I had heard the music used in a skating routine and had also been told that the movie was wonderful. The music is beautiful, but that's about all this film has going for it. First thing you should know when watching this movie; there is NO spoken dialogue. It's ALL in song. You get used to it after a while, but it gives the movie a "cheesy" feel. Plus it's annoying! The storyline is predictable; boy and girl are in love; boy is drafted for two years and the girl says she'll wait for him. The scenery in "Umbrellas" didn't strike me as "beautiful and breathtaking" as everyone says. It just looks like cheap (and very bright) movie sets. This film would have been SO much better if it were a "normal" movie, with spoken words instead of the constant singing. Yes, it was filmed in 1964, but it LOOKS like it. I like movies with a more "timeless" appeal, even if it's apparent that they are from another era. If they had to have singing in this film, they should have made it a real musical, on the lines of "My Fair Lady". where there is both singing and speaking.

    I wanted to love "Umbrellas", but I was incredibly disappointed in this film. I rented it mainly because I had heard the music used in a skating routine and had also been told that the movie was wonderful. The music is beautiful, but that's about all this film has going for it. First thing you should know when watching this movie; there is NO spoken dialogue. It's ALL in song. You get used to it after a while, but it gives the movie a "cheesy" feel. Plus it's annoying! The storyline is predictable; boy and girl are in love; boy is drafted for two years and the girl says she'll wait for him. The scenery in "Umbrellas" didn't strike me as "beautiful and breathtaking" as everyone says. It just looks like cheap (and very bright) movie sets. This film would have been SO much better if it were a "normal" movie, with spoken words instead of the constant singing. Yes, it was filmed in 1964, but it LOOKS like it. I like movies with a more "timeless" appeal, even if it's apparent that they are from another era. If they had to have singing in this film, they should have made it a real musical, on the lines of "My Fair Lady". where there is both singing and speaking.

  • Aug 09, 2020

    Sumptuous restoration heightens the gorgeousness of the actors and cinematography with the sweeping Legrand score

    Sumptuous restoration heightens the gorgeousness of the actors and cinematography with the sweeping Legrand score

  • Aug 09, 2020

    It's positively homophobic that no one told me about Nino Castelnuovo until today. He set off my dreamboat alarms to a distracting agree while watching this movie for the first time and for that I am thankful. While I can't proclaim to particularly love the operatic, sung dialogue I was so enraptured by the brilliant color and visual direction of this movie that I was completely swept up into it regardless. Now excuse me while I go daydream of working at a colorful umbrella shop with a dreamy boyfriend mechanic.

    It's positively homophobic that no one told me about Nino Castelnuovo until today. He set off my dreamboat alarms to a distracting agree while watching this movie for the first time and for that I am thankful. While I can't proclaim to particularly love the operatic, sung dialogue I was so enraptured by the brilliant color and visual direction of this movie that I was completely swept up into it regardless. Now excuse me while I go daydream of working at a colorful umbrella shop with a dreamy boyfriend mechanic.

  • Mar 28, 2020

    This film is polarizing for me. On the one hand, the vivid colors and individual soundtracks (especially the jazz tracks) are infectious, but for every single line to be sung was both unnecessary and aggravating, like a dull throbbing in my head that I couldn't shake. The melody-saturated dialogue takes away from much of the immersion in the narrative, with the actors' tones often conflicting with that of the script. As the film itself says, "All that singing gives me pain. I like movies better." (3/5)

    This film is polarizing for me. On the one hand, the vivid colors and individual soundtracks (especially the jazz tracks) are infectious, but for every single line to be sung was both unnecessary and aggravating, like a dull throbbing in my head that I couldn't shake. The melody-saturated dialogue takes away from much of the immersion in the narrative, with the actors' tones often conflicting with that of the script. As the film itself says, "All that singing gives me pain. I like movies better." (3/5)

  • Jan 06, 2020

    Des premières notes enthousiasmantes de son ouverture à la scène finale tragique, cet opéra de la nouvelle vague est un magnifique chef-d'œuvre de couleurs, de musique, de performance et de mise en scène, une histoire simple racontée avec une originalité et une beauté saisissantes.

    Des premières notes enthousiasmantes de son ouverture à la scène finale tragique, cet opéra de la nouvelle vague est un magnifique chef-d'œuvre de couleurs, de musique, de performance et de mise en scène, une histoire simple racontée avec une originalité et une beauté saisissantes.

  • Oct 13, 2019

    "Les parapluies de Cherbourg" is a wonderfull musical, Jacques Demy deliver us one of the best musical that was ever made. The director, and The main two actors : Catherine Deneuve and Nino Castelnuovo archiving to make the spectator feel emotionally conected to the characers at all time though the movie. "Les parapluies de cherbourg" is an artistic and technical sucess.

    "Les parapluies de Cherbourg" is a wonderfull musical, Jacques Demy deliver us one of the best musical that was ever made. The director, and The main two actors : Catherine Deneuve and Nino Castelnuovo archiving to make the spectator feel emotionally conected to the characers at all time though the movie. "Les parapluies de cherbourg" is an artistic and technical sucess.

  • Aug 10, 2019

    4/5 The joke about Sondheim musicals is that you can mimic his shows by simply singing any ordinary thing you are saying. Welcome to Cherbourg! If you don't know already, every word of dialogue in this film is sung. Since I am relegated to reading the English captions, it wasn't hard to imagine this film without the music. The dialogue is never interrupted with any heart rending arias or other show-stopping songs. I wanted to get a sense of whether it was worth watching without the music. Maybe that's dumb - perhaps it's an essential thread that cannot be pulled out. But I think there was much more indeed. Catherine Deneuve is adorable as Genevieve, a 17 year old shop clerk in her mother's store, selling umbrellas. It's a real store, by the way; 13 Rue De Port, Cherbourg. She's in love with Guy (Nino Castelnuovo). Her mother is in bad financial straits, and Guy gets his draft notice for Algeria (the movie is set in 1957). The shop is rescued by Roland Cassard, who is always referred to by his full name. He eventually expresses his desire to marry Genevieve while Guy is still overseas. Emoting ensues. Jacques Demy is known for his vibrant color choices, and I can't help but wonder if this film (1964) helped create the full color style of the 1960s, or just reflected it. For instance, the shop has pink wallpaper with thin green vertical stripes. In the flat that Genevieve shares with her mother, the wallpaper is the same, but the colors reversed. Their bold outfits clash outrageously with the other wallpapers. Guy's room is decorated in painfully bright deep blue, and he has a toy Esso station, in addition an two oil tanker models on the mantle, reflecting his job at a service station (that's what we used to call gas stations, kids. They did more than pump gas and sell Red Bull). The war for Algerian independence, which ended in 1962, and Vietnam before that, were open wounds in France in 1964. I'm trying to imagine a similar American musical made in 1977 about Vietnam. It doesn't work. Americans no longer have the artistic capacity to transform national trauma into a whimsical artifice. But this isn't film confection, despite how it looks and sounds. That's the point. Demy layered those absurd elements over an otherwise bittersweet melodrama. I can't say why. How much did Esso pay for all the product placement?

    4/5 The joke about Sondheim musicals is that you can mimic his shows by simply singing any ordinary thing you are saying. Welcome to Cherbourg! If you don't know already, every word of dialogue in this film is sung. Since I am relegated to reading the English captions, it wasn't hard to imagine this film without the music. The dialogue is never interrupted with any heart rending arias or other show-stopping songs. I wanted to get a sense of whether it was worth watching without the music. Maybe that's dumb - perhaps it's an essential thread that cannot be pulled out. But I think there was much more indeed. Catherine Deneuve is adorable as Genevieve, a 17 year old shop clerk in her mother's store, selling umbrellas. It's a real store, by the way; 13 Rue De Port, Cherbourg. She's in love with Guy (Nino Castelnuovo). Her mother is in bad financial straits, and Guy gets his draft notice for Algeria (the movie is set in 1957). The shop is rescued by Roland Cassard, who is always referred to by his full name. He eventually expresses his desire to marry Genevieve while Guy is still overseas. Emoting ensues. Jacques Demy is known for his vibrant color choices, and I can't help but wonder if this film (1964) helped create the full color style of the 1960s, or just reflected it. For instance, the shop has pink wallpaper with thin green vertical stripes. In the flat that Genevieve shares with her mother, the wallpaper is the same, but the colors reversed. Their bold outfits clash outrageously with the other wallpapers. Guy's room is decorated in painfully bright deep blue, and he has a toy Esso station, in addition an two oil tanker models on the mantle, reflecting his job at a service station (that's what we used to call gas stations, kids. They did more than pump gas and sell Red Bull). The war for Algerian independence, which ended in 1962, and Vietnam before that, were open wounds in France in 1964. I'm trying to imagine a similar American musical made in 1977 about Vietnam. It doesn't work. Americans no longer have the artistic capacity to transform national trauma into a whimsical artifice. But this isn't film confection, despite how it looks and sounds. That's the point. Demy layered those absurd elements over an otherwise bittersweet melodrama. I can't say why. How much did Esso pay for all the product placement?

  • Apr 29, 2019

    The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is more an opera than a musical (every line is sung rather than characters suddenly breaking into song). It takes a little while to get used to the format, but once you've settled in, it would be hard to imagine this movie any other way. I'm unable to judge the quality of the poetry as I don't speak French, but some of the music was memorable. The bright colors contrast with the bittersweet story, and the final scene made the investment in the story worthwhile.

    The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is more an opera than a musical (every line is sung rather than characters suddenly breaking into song). It takes a little while to get used to the format, but once you've settled in, it would be hard to imagine this movie any other way. I'm unable to judge the quality of the poetry as I don't speak French, but some of the music was memorable. The bright colors contrast with the bittersweet story, and the final scene made the investment in the story worthwhile.