The War of the Gargantuas (Furankenshutain no kaijû: Sanda tai Gaira) Reviews

  • Mar 11, 2019

    This is a MUST SEE for any fan of the genre- one of the best.An experimental lab animal called a gargantua escapes from his captors and is suspected to be the creature that is killing people all over the countryside. But when the gargantua from the lab appears at the same time as the evil gargantua, the two begin to battle across Japan. The production quality and cinematography is very good for the budget and the producers put in a real effort to make a "good movie" based on the Cain and Abel mythos. Much darker than other movies of the genre the (the monsters bleed and people get eaten) and the story is compelling. "War Of The Gargantuas" is in the best tradition of the goofy spirit of fun 60s kaiju films.

    This is a MUST SEE for any fan of the genre- one of the best.An experimental lab animal called a gargantua escapes from his captors and is suspected to be the creature that is killing people all over the countryside. But when the gargantua from the lab appears at the same time as the evil gargantua, the two begin to battle across Japan. The production quality and cinematography is very good for the budget and the producers put in a real effort to make a "good movie" based on the Cain and Abel mythos. Much darker than other movies of the genre the (the monsters bleed and people get eaten) and the story is compelling. "War Of The Gargantuas" is in the best tradition of the goofy spirit of fun 60s kaiju films.

  • Jan 18, 2019

    Absolutely the best movie made from Toho studios!! It didn't follow all the Godzilla rules, and it made it that much better. The monsters hurt, bled, fought back, etc. It was actually scary to me when I was younger. Why? Green chased, attacked and ate people and spit out their clothes! The environments were huge, beautifully detailed, and to scale. There was an actual story. Lots of monster screen time. I wish Toho had modeled more of their movies after this one!

    Absolutely the best movie made from Toho studios!! It didn't follow all the Godzilla rules, and it made it that much better. The monsters hurt, bled, fought back, etc. It was actually scary to me when I was younger. Why? Green chased, attacked and ate people and spit out their clothes! The environments were huge, beautifully detailed, and to scale. There was an actual story. Lots of monster screen time. I wish Toho had modeled more of their movies after this one!

  • Feb 27, 2018

    it is what it is, and Hondo did a great job of delivering it.

    it is what it is, and Hondo did a great job of delivering it.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    One of the greatest in Toho history! The story of good vs. evil, but with two giant hairy monsters starring as both sides! The effects were great, the pacing was fast, the plot was awesome..... but Russ Tamblyn was absolutely horrible! He showed no emotion whatsoever, even when his partner falls down a cliff, only to be caught by a gargantua! (Sanda, the good one) The American version seemed to overuse stock music and repeat the same theme from Akira Ifukube over and over again. But overall, a great movie for the worst time in Toho history.

    One of the greatest in Toho history! The story of good vs. evil, but with two giant hairy monsters starring as both sides! The effects were great, the pacing was fast, the plot was awesome..... but Russ Tamblyn was absolutely horrible! He showed no emotion whatsoever, even when his partner falls down a cliff, only to be caught by a gargantua! (Sanda, the good one) The American version seemed to overuse stock music and repeat the same theme from Akira Ifukube over and over again. But overall, a great movie for the worst time in Toho history.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    A Classic Japanese monster family movie.

    A Classic Japanese monster family movie.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    Entertaining monster movie. It has some nice characters and great kaiju and is pretty much a classic. Even Brad Pitt mention it on the Oscars. Very enjoyable monster movie.

    Entertaining monster movie. It has some nice characters and great kaiju and is pretty much a classic. Even Brad Pitt mention it on the Oscars. Very enjoyable monster movie.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    Campy giant monster movie goodness with the usual awkward dialogue and acting

    Campy giant monster movie goodness with the usual awkward dialogue and acting

  • Feb 27, 2018

    Here we have it; another Japanese movie where guys in rubber suits fight each other and destroy Tokyo! Now I'm actually something of a fan of this genre, and I consider the original Godzilla to be a masterpiece. War of the Gargantuas doesn't even come close to Godzilla. It is an exercise in pure camp. But camp of course has an appeal of its own. The plot is pretty standard Dekakaiju fare. A smuggling vessel is attacked by a giant squid. Then a hairy green giant appears, fights the squid, and sinks the boat. More sightings follow up and down the coast. Scientists dismiss speculation that this is the same monster they had raised years before (more on that later) at one point attributing a report from a group of tourists to a bad LSD trip. Soon, the not-so-jolly green giant comes to shore and begins wreaking havoc. The army drives him up into the mountains, where they nearly destroy him- but then a second, brown giant comes to his rescue! The two Gargantuas, as they're called throughout the movie, spend several days lounging around a lake, until they have a falling out over the morality of eating humans. Spurned by his 'brother', the green giant makes a beeline for the ocean- looking like a mutated track star as he runs headlong across the countryside. Inevitably, the two duke it out again, devastating much of Tokyo in the process, and are both killed by an underwater volcano. This film is a semi-sequel to incredibly lousy Frankenstein Conquers the World, although there's little continuity between the two. The word 'Frankenstein' is never used never used here. And when the scientists flash-back to the monster's early years, instead of seeing footage from the previous film, we're treated to new footage in which the infant Frankenstein/Gargantua looks completely different than he did in the other movie. There's also the fact that he's at least doubled in size, but never mind. Of course the scientists tell everyone they can that the brown Gargantua poses no danger, and of course no-one listens. There's also the usual theory about the monsters' origins. It's conjectured that a piece of the brown Gargantua was somehow cut off, and when exposed to a source of protein, grew into a second, green Gargantua. This means that if the army blows them up, there could be hundreds of them! This information is by turns taken to heart and ignored by the generals. Plus there's a fairly interesting bit about how the green Gargantua is frightened by bright lights. This results in the citizens of Tokyo turning all of their lights on during attacks, and allows the army to repel him with searchlights. Later, he loses this fear because he realizes that there tends to be food (i.e. people) near light sources. Personally, I think he stops being afraid of the light because the plot requires him to. And when our heroes go to the lake to find and hopefully study the monsters, there are numerous hikers, campers, and even boaters enjoying themselves. If I heard that a man-eating aquatic giant was last seen nearby, I'd pick another fishing spot, but hey, that's just me. The only thing more ridiculous than the sight of all these tourists is the speech we get about "youth flourishing in the face of evil." Overshadowing the not unexpected problems of continuity and logic, there's also the matter of the acting. The acting in most Kaiju (Japanese monster) movies is a bit stilted, perhaps a little too broad. What we have here is much worse. The American scientist (*** filling in for the late Nick Adams) strikes the wrong tone in every scene. He's cool and laid back when he should be tense. He's cracking jokes when he should be terrified. And he never once sounds like the kind of guy who spends most of his time in a lab. He comes across more as a playboy or a wise guy. But it may actually not be the actor's fault, for this movie contains the worst dubbing job I have ever seen. Rather than try to describe it, I will give examples. One villager on seeing the green monster emerge from the sea cries out "Hey, look at that!" The scientist, planning their search for the monsters- "I'll go to the Japan Alps." "And I'll go to the beach." "Good." With a plan like that, the monster is as good as found. Asked about the risks posed by their research, the head scientist assures the crowd that "We experiment only when it is safe." The army publicly states that their attacks are meant to "prevent him from escaping to the sea- and to destroy him of course." It would appear that the Japanese Self Defense Force has placed Captain Obvious in charge of public relations. After all the time I've spent listing this movie's failings, I would like to say that there are good reasons to watch it. Because the monster costumes are much lighter than those in other films, and allow more freedom of moment, the final battle between the Gargantuas is actually very well staged. I'm told that Quinton Terantino showed the actors in Kill Bill footage from Gargantuas before having them perform their combat sequences. More importantly, this movie is simply so bad that it's kind of good, in its own goofy way. Most of the time I was more bemused than annoyed by the movie's flaws, and towards the end I found myself enjoying the experience. It seems that in its adaptation for American audiences, War of the Gargantuas was transformed from a fairly standard monster movie into a minor gem of unintentional comedy. It's a bad movie sure, but it's a Good bad movie.

    Here we have it; another Japanese movie where guys in rubber suits fight each other and destroy Tokyo! Now I'm actually something of a fan of this genre, and I consider the original Godzilla to be a masterpiece. War of the Gargantuas doesn't even come close to Godzilla. It is an exercise in pure camp. But camp of course has an appeal of its own. The plot is pretty standard Dekakaiju fare. A smuggling vessel is attacked by a giant squid. Then a hairy green giant appears, fights the squid, and sinks the boat. More sightings follow up and down the coast. Scientists dismiss speculation that this is the same monster they had raised years before (more on that later) at one point attributing a report from a group of tourists to a bad LSD trip. Soon, the not-so-jolly green giant comes to shore and begins wreaking havoc. The army drives him up into the mountains, where they nearly destroy him- but then a second, brown giant comes to his rescue! The two Gargantuas, as they're called throughout the movie, spend several days lounging around a lake, until they have a falling out over the morality of eating humans. Spurned by his 'brother', the green giant makes a beeline for the ocean- looking like a mutated track star as he runs headlong across the countryside. Inevitably, the two duke it out again, devastating much of Tokyo in the process, and are both killed by an underwater volcano. This film is a semi-sequel to incredibly lousy Frankenstein Conquers the World, although there's little continuity between the two. The word 'Frankenstein' is never used never used here. And when the scientists flash-back to the monster's early years, instead of seeing footage from the previous film, we're treated to new footage in which the infant Frankenstein/Gargantua looks completely different than he did in the other movie. There's also the fact that he's at least doubled in size, but never mind. Of course the scientists tell everyone they can that the brown Gargantua poses no danger, and of course no-one listens. There's also the usual theory about the monsters' origins. It's conjectured that a piece of the brown Gargantua was somehow cut off, and when exposed to a source of protein, grew into a second, green Gargantua. This means that if the army blows them up, there could be hundreds of them! This information is by turns taken to heart and ignored by the generals. Plus there's a fairly interesting bit about how the green Gargantua is frightened by bright lights. This results in the citizens of Tokyo turning all of their lights on during attacks, and allows the army to repel him with searchlights. Later, he loses this fear because he realizes that there tends to be food (i.e. people) near light sources. Personally, I think he stops being afraid of the light because the plot requires him to. And when our heroes go to the lake to find and hopefully study the monsters, there are numerous hikers, campers, and even boaters enjoying themselves. If I heard that a man-eating aquatic giant was last seen nearby, I'd pick another fishing spot, but hey, that's just me. The only thing more ridiculous than the sight of all these tourists is the speech we get about "youth flourishing in the face of evil." Overshadowing the not unexpected problems of continuity and logic, there's also the matter of the acting. The acting in most Kaiju (Japanese monster) movies is a bit stilted, perhaps a little too broad. What we have here is much worse. The American scientist (*** filling in for the late Nick Adams) strikes the wrong tone in every scene. He's cool and laid back when he should be tense. He's cracking jokes when he should be terrified. And he never once sounds like the kind of guy who spends most of his time in a lab. He comes across more as a playboy or a wise guy. But it may actually not be the actor's fault, for this movie contains the worst dubbing job I have ever seen. Rather than try to describe it, I will give examples. One villager on seeing the green monster emerge from the sea cries out "Hey, look at that!" The scientist, planning their search for the monsters- "I'll go to the Japan Alps." "And I'll go to the beach." "Good." With a plan like that, the monster is as good as found. Asked about the risks posed by their research, the head scientist assures the crowd that "We experiment only when it is safe." The army publicly states that their attacks are meant to "prevent him from escaping to the sea- and to destroy him of course." It would appear that the Japanese Self Defense Force has placed Captain Obvious in charge of public relations. After all the time I've spent listing this movie's failings, I would like to say that there are good reasons to watch it. Because the monster costumes are much lighter than those in other films, and allow more freedom of moment, the final battle between the Gargantuas is actually very well staged. I'm told that Quinton Terantino showed the actors in Kill Bill footage from Gargantuas before having them perform their combat sequences. More importantly, this movie is simply so bad that it's kind of good, in its own goofy way. Most of the time I was more bemused than annoyed by the movie's flaws, and towards the end I found myself enjoying the experience. It seems that in its adaptation for American audiences, War of the Gargantuas was transformed from a fairly standard monster movie into a minor gem of unintentional comedy. It's a bad movie sure, but it's a Good bad movie.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    War Of The Gargantuas is alot of fun. I definately recommend this to all monster fans.

    War Of The Gargantuas is alot of fun. I definately recommend this to all monster fans.

  • Feb 27, 2018

    My favorite giant monster movie of all time. The movie has action, terror, and a creative plot.

    My favorite giant monster movie of all time. The movie has action, terror, and a creative plot.