The Zookeeper's Wife (2017) - Rotten Tomatoes

The Zookeeper's Wife (2017)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: The Zookeeper's Wife has noble intentions, but is ultimately unable to bring its fact-based story to life with quite as much impact as it deserves.

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Movie Info

The real-life story of one working wife and mother who became a hero to hundreds during World War II. In 1939 Poland, Antonina Żabińska (portrayed by two-time Academy Award nominee Jessica Chastain) and her husband, Dr. Jan Żabiński (Johan Heldenbergh of "The Broken Circle Breakdown"), have the Warsaw Zoo flourishing under his stewardship and her care. When their country is invaded by the Germans, Jan and Antonina are stunned - and forced to report to the Reich's newly appointed chief zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl of "Captain America: Civil War"). To fight back on their own terms, Antonina and Jan covertly begin working with the Resistance - and put into action plans to save lives out of what has become the Warsaw Ghetto, with Antonina putting herself and even her children at great risk.

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Cast

Jessica Chastain
as Antonina Zabinska
Daniel Brühl
as Lutz Heck
Johan Heldenbergh
as Jan Zabinski
Iddo Goldberg
as Maurycy Fraenkel
Shira Haas
as Urszula

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Critic Reviews for The Zookeeper's Wife

All Critics (152) | Top Critics (36)

It doesn't burn through the conscience and haunt you forever like Schindler's List, but in spite of its laid-back reluctance to shock and horrify, it's never trivial or boring.

April 5, 2017 | Rating: 3/4 | Full Review…

Niki Caro breaks out of the genre and emerges with a truly moving and original film. She uses the familiar structure of survival and rescue, but her focus is on the mechanics of cruelty itself in an unlikely setting.

April 4, 2017 | Full Review…

How this was managed is truly inspiring, but the way it plays out in Angela Workman's script (adapted from Diane Ackerman's bestseller) is strictly by the numbers.

March 31, 2017 | Rating: C | Full Review…

If it's remembered at all, it will be seen as a missed opportunity to tell a powerful story.

March 31, 2017 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…

Jessica Chastain is relaxed with some actual lion cubs, and there's a bunny that should win an Oscar. But when the film pivots to the scared human beings down below, you get a hint of the weirder, tougher drama it might have been.

March 31, 2017 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…

Again and again, the fuse is lit and then fizzles. Eventually, bewildered disinterest sets in.

March 31, 2017 | Rating: 1/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Zookeeper's Wife

½

Antonina Zabinski (Jessica Chastain) and her husband Jan (Johan Heldenbergh) are the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo. Their lives are thrown into turmoil when Germany invades and occupies Poland. Their animals are slaughtered or moved to the Berlin Zoo, under the care of Nazi party member and amateur geneticist Lutz Heck (Daniel Bruhl). Feeling impotent to the horrors around them, Antonina and Jan risk everything to hide Jews in their zoo and eventually smuggle them out to safe houses. The Zookeeper's Wife is one of those slice-of-life stories about good people risking much to save lives during the Holocaust that come from obscurity to remind you that there are still fresh, invigorating stories from a topic that can feel tapped out after 70 years. However, it's also an indication that you need the right handling to do it justice. The Holocaust is by nature such a horrific subject matter that it's hard to do it justice with a PG-13 or below rating, but it can be done with the right amount of artistic restraint as long as the overall story doesn't feel hobbled with limitations. Reluctantly, The Zookeeper's Wife feels a bit too sanitized for the story it's telling. When it comes to cruelty and human atrocity, you don't need to shove the audience's face in the mess to fully comprehend its distaste, but overly avoiding the reality can also be a detriment. The Zookeeper's Wife, as a PG-13 movie, does not feel like the ideal way to tell this real-life story. It feels too restrained and some of those artistic compromises make for a movie that feels lacking and distracting at points. Fair warning: there are plenty of animal deaths in this movie, though they are all dealt with off-screen with implied violence. The edits to work around this can be jarring and would take me out of the picture. This is only one example of an element that, in order to maintain its dignified PG-13 rating, unfortunately undercuts the realism and power of its story. For a Holocaust story set in Poland, the stakes feel abnormally low. The zoo is a sanctuary compared to the Jewish ghettos. The danger of hiding over 300 Jewish people over the course of the entire war feels absent, which is strange considering it should be felt in just about every moment. There are a handful of scenes where we worry whether they will be caught but they're defused so quickly and easily. After Antonina is caught talking to a very Jewish-looking "doctor" in her bedroom by the housekeeper, they just fire the housekeeper who leaves quietly and never comes back again. It's a moment of tension that can be felt and it all goes away in a rush. This scene also stands out because the narrow escapes and close calls are surprisingly few and far between. Even when Antonina's son commits stupid mistake after stupid mistake, including impulsively insulting a Nazi officer to his back, there's little fear of some sort of retribution. The movie can also lack subtlety, like watching Heck say three times he's a man of his word and will be trustworthy. We all know he's going to fall short. There's also a moment where Jan is literally loading children, who each raise their arms in anticipation, onto a train car. It's like getting punched in the stomach with every child. Much of the time spent on the zoo is with the quiet moments trying to make the Jewish survivors feel like human beings again (the animals-in-cages metaphor is there). The details of the smuggling and hiding are interesting but cannot carry a movie without more. The biggest reason to see this movie is the promise of another leading Chastain (Miss Sloane) performance. Ever since rocketing to prominence in 2011, Chastain has proven to be one of the most reliably excellent actors in the industry regardless of the quality of the film. She's been dubbed a Streep in the making and Zookeeper's Wife allows her to level up to her "Sophie's Choice acting challenge stage" and try on that famous Slavic accent that turns all "ing" endings into "ink." Chastain is terrific as a person trying to navigate their way through the unimaginable, calling upon reserves of courage when needed, and she's at her best during the moments with Herr Heck. She has to play the dishonorable part of the possible lover, and Heck definitely has his heart set on Antonina. The scenes with the two of them draw out the most tension and afford Chastain a variety of emotions to play as she cycles through her masks. In some ways I wish the more of the movie was focused on this personal conflict and developed it even further. There was a small practically incidental moment that got me thinking. As stated above, the film has a PG-13 rating and one of the reasons is for brief nudity from Chastain. Now the actress has gone nude before in other movies so that's not much of a shocker, but it's the context and execution that got me thinking. Antonina and Jan are lying together in bed after sex and Chastain does the usually Hollywood habit of the bed sheet being at her shoulders while it resides at the man's waist (those typical L-shaped bed sheets). No big deal. Then, during their discussion over what to do, Antonina rolls over and exposes her breast for a second before she covers herself up again. The reason this stood out to me, beyond the prurient, is because it felt like a mistake. It seems obvious that Chastain was not intended to be seen naked in this intimate post-coital conversation but it was used in the final cut anyway, which made me wonder. Was the take so good, or so much better than the others, that director Niki Caro (Whale Rider, McFarland, USA) and Chastain said "the hell with it" and kept the briefly exposed breast? Did they enjoy the happily accidental casual nature to the nudity, creating a stronger sense of realism between the married couple? Or in the end was it just another selling point to help put butts in seats? I'm thinking best take is the answer. You decide. I am convinced one of the main reasons that Chastain wanted to do this movie, and I can't really blame her, is because she would get to hold a bunch of adorable animals. Given the subject matter, I was prepared for a menagerie of cute little creatures, but I started noticing just how many of them Chastain is seen holding. She holds a rabbit for a monologue. She holds a lion cub. She holds a baby pig. She holds a monkey. She even kind of holds a rubbery baby elephant doll (talk about Save the Cat moment, this movie takes it even more literally). There may very well be animals I simply have forgotten she held. I would not be surprised if in her contract there was a rider that insisted that Ms. Chastain hold at least one small, adorable animal every third day of filming on set. Stately and sincere, The Zookeeper's Wife is an inherently interesting true story that should have more than enough elements to bring to life a compelling film experience. It's an acceptable movie that's well made but I can't help but feel that there's a better version of this story out there. It feels a tad too safe, a tad too sanitized, a tad too absent a sense of stakes, like it's on awards-caliber autopilot. Chastain is good but her Polish accent becomes a near metaphor for the larger film: it's polished and proper but you can't help but feel like something is lacking and going through the motions of what is expected. This is a worthy story and I'm sure there are great moments of drama, but The Zookeeper's Wife feels a bit too clipped and misshapen to do its story real justice. Nate's Grade: B-

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

Could have been and should have been a very good movie but instead it is a tepid look at life in Warsaw in the 1940's Nazi invasion of Poland. This movie would have better served with subtitles. When the audience reacts more to the killing of animals than humans you know something's amiss. Chastain cannot attain what Streep did in Sophie's Choice and that is to give us a character we can connect with. (4-8-17).

John C
John C

Super Reviewer

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