The Third Man Reviews

  • Jun 28, 2020

    This may not be Orson Welles movie, but he does appear in this movie as the bad guy. Anyway, The Third Man is an amazing movie that really shows the performance of Orson Welles and the direction of Carol Reed at the same time. I also enjoy the editing and the cinematography as well as the writing. I know this film may not be a fan favorite for Orson Welles' fans, but this movie is perfect. Overall, The Third Man is a one of a kind movie.

    This may not be Orson Welles movie, but he does appear in this movie as the bad guy. Anyway, The Third Man is an amazing movie that really shows the performance of Orson Welles and the direction of Carol Reed at the same time. I also enjoy the editing and the cinematography as well as the writing. I know this film may not be a fan favorite for Orson Welles' fans, but this movie is perfect. Overall, The Third Man is a one of a kind movie.

  • Jun 11, 2020

    Another legendary picture that I'm — mostly — regretting not seeing sooner, Carol Reed's "The Third Man" might be the benchmark film noir in terms of pacing and structure, with a first and second act that unfolds in a deliberate, yet engrossing manner and a relentless finale that leaves you absolutely speechless. These narrative attributes are thanks in no small part to master storyteller and novelist Graham Greene, who penned the film's screenplay. This is a project that takes great pride in its slow burn approach, offering up a veneer of normalcy to the viewer, but with little nuances in the dialogue, tonality and camerawork to let you know something's not quite right here. Once the reveals come, though, I'll say I had a consistently pervasive smile on my face. Any and every scene with Orson Welles is nothing short of iconic. That's not to take away from Joseph Cotten's commendable lead turn. It's just that, with the way the movie sets everything up involving Welles character, you really can't help but leave the screening remembering every scene involving him. And, while I will admit that I personally didn't care for the score (it is admittedly good music, but I also felt it didn't really fit the tone and mood of the film overall), this is still a fantastic watch.

    Another legendary picture that I'm — mostly — regretting not seeing sooner, Carol Reed's "The Third Man" might be the benchmark film noir in terms of pacing and structure, with a first and second act that unfolds in a deliberate, yet engrossing manner and a relentless finale that leaves you absolutely speechless. These narrative attributes are thanks in no small part to master storyteller and novelist Graham Greene, who penned the film's screenplay. This is a project that takes great pride in its slow burn approach, offering up a veneer of normalcy to the viewer, but with little nuances in the dialogue, tonality and camerawork to let you know something's not quite right here. Once the reveals come, though, I'll say I had a consistently pervasive smile on my face. Any and every scene with Orson Welles is nothing short of iconic. That's not to take away from Joseph Cotten's commendable lead turn. It's just that, with the way the movie sets everything up involving Welles character, you really can't help but leave the screening remembering every scene involving him. And, while I will admit that I personally didn't care for the score (it is admittedly good music, but I also felt it didn't really fit the tone and mood of the film overall), this is still a fantastic watch.

  • May 22, 2020

    AFI 100 Greatest Films - #57: I remember about six months ago I was looking to read The Heart of the Matter and found it in a larger collection of Graham Greene's work. Upon completing that, on the following page was a short story titled The Third Man, and the famous movie I had never seen came to mind, never even realizing Greene was involved in that. Greene explains in a short editor's note preceding this story that this was never even meant for publication and was simply part of his method when contracted to develop a script. I will quote Greene now, "To me it is almost impossible to write a film play without first writing a story. Even a film depends on more than plot, on a certain measure of characterization, on mood and atmosphere; and these seem to me almost impossible to capture for the first time in the dull shorthand of a script." Greene goes on to dedicate this story to director Carol Reed, "in admiration and affection and in memory of so many early morning Vienna hours at Maxim's, the Casanova, the Oriental", and when viewing these two quotes in the context of this film we can begin to see how Reed and Greene were able to achieve, along with the score, a certain feeling or ambiance amidst the streets of postwar Vienna that is really what many will remember most about this film. The roles were well cast and acted all around and while the story may not offer the opportunity to have our points of view challenged or change the way we think this film accomplishes exactly what it sets out to do, provide an engrossing mystery thriller that keeps the audience engaged until the conclusion. Before I started this film today I thought back and realized I didn't remember much at all about The Heart of the Matter but could still recall The Third Man fondly. *Usually refrain from placing ratings on films based on books I have previously read as it is nearly always unfair to the film.

    AFI 100 Greatest Films - #57: I remember about six months ago I was looking to read The Heart of the Matter and found it in a larger collection of Graham Greene's work. Upon completing that, on the following page was a short story titled The Third Man, and the famous movie I had never seen came to mind, never even realizing Greene was involved in that. Greene explains in a short editor's note preceding this story that this was never even meant for publication and was simply part of his method when contracted to develop a script. I will quote Greene now, "To me it is almost impossible to write a film play without first writing a story. Even a film depends on more than plot, on a certain measure of characterization, on mood and atmosphere; and these seem to me almost impossible to capture for the first time in the dull shorthand of a script." Greene goes on to dedicate this story to director Carol Reed, "in admiration and affection and in memory of so many early morning Vienna hours at Maxim's, the Casanova, the Oriental", and when viewing these two quotes in the context of this film we can begin to see how Reed and Greene were able to achieve, along with the score, a certain feeling or ambiance amidst the streets of postwar Vienna that is really what many will remember most about this film. The roles were well cast and acted all around and while the story may not offer the opportunity to have our points of view challenged or change the way we think this film accomplishes exactly what it sets out to do, provide an engrossing mystery thriller that keeps the audience engaged until the conclusion. Before I started this film today I thought back and realized I didn't remember much at all about The Heart of the Matter but could still recall The Third Man fondly. *Usually refrain from placing ratings on films based on books I have previously read as it is nearly always unfair to the film.

  • May 13, 2020

    Even after having to dissect it in school, this classic still has plenty of depth and rewatch factor

    Even after having to dissect it in school, this classic still has plenty of depth and rewatch factor

  • Apr 18, 2020

    Slow-burn thriller with a mostly unfortunate soundtrack. The pacing is a problem and one-instrument soundtrack distracting, though iconic. Beautifully shot and decently acted film. Orson Welles steals the show and the film picks up when his character becomes directly involved. Worth inquiring minds.

    Slow-burn thriller with a mostly unfortunate soundtrack. The pacing is a problem and one-instrument soundtrack distracting, though iconic. Beautifully shot and decently acted film. Orson Welles steals the show and the film picks up when his character becomes directly involved. Worth inquiring minds.

  • Apr 14, 2020

    The Third Man has beautiful cinematography, interesting scenes and manages to convey a great suspense

    The Third Man has beautiful cinematography, interesting scenes and manages to convey a great suspense

  • Feb 27, 2020

    Welles is at the height of his powers in this stylishly crafted thriller that pits morality against Machiavellianism, rightfully deserving of its stellar reputation.

    Welles is at the height of his powers in this stylishly crafted thriller that pits morality against Machiavellianism, rightfully deserving of its stellar reputation.

  • Feb 16, 2020

    One of the best ever. The black and white night-time cinematography is the bomb. The background music drives you crazy but is so appropripo. I watch this every time it comes on TCM. Pure love.

    One of the best ever. The black and white night-time cinematography is the bomb. The background music drives you crazy but is so appropripo. I watch this every time it comes on TCM. Pure love.

  • Feb 11, 2020

    What a disappointment. All the raving about how great this movie is, what a masterpiece it is, etc., makes no sense to me. This movie almost put me to sleep (the music doesn't help, but the first 2/3rds or so are mostly pretty boring). There is really nothing worth watching badly dated mystery for. Awful, overrated garbage. And it had Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles too in it; what a waste of talent. Why the hell is this worthless piece of trash praised?!???

    What a disappointment. All the raving about how great this movie is, what a masterpiece it is, etc., makes no sense to me. This movie almost put me to sleep (the music doesn't help, but the first 2/3rds or so are mostly pretty boring). There is really nothing worth watching badly dated mystery for. Awful, overrated garbage. And it had Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles too in it; what a waste of talent. Why the hell is this worthless piece of trash praised?!???

  • Feb 08, 2020

    A short but sparkling performance by Welles, a lovely music theme, and an important subject are what keep this film entertaining even 70 years later.

    A short but sparkling performance by Welles, a lovely music theme, and an important subject are what keep this film entertaining even 70 years later.