Three Colors: White (Trois Couleurs: Blanc) Reviews

  • Aug 24, 2020

    Another amazing movie of the three colors trilogy, not the best one of the trilogy and not as good as the first one but the movie itself was great. Karol Karol is a Polish immigrant who got divorced from his French wife Dominique. Karol is now forced to leave France after losing his wife, the business he and she jointly owned, his house and his money. One day, Karol meets a Polish expatriate called: Mikolah who smuggles him back to their homeland and from there Karol starts to build his new life. White was a movie that I absolutely enjoyed, the 1st act of the film made me wonder what will happen next so I was curious to know where the movie will take me, but when the 2nd act came on, I felt like I was getting bored and the movie started to get cold, but the 3rd act saved the movie and I really loved it. Zbigniew Zamachowski's performance as Karol Karol was good, he gave us that character who acts dumb but you'll never expect what will come out of him. good performance but I feel like another actor would have given us a better performance. Julie Delpy as Dominique was a great choice although she did appear in just a few scenes except at the end. Janusz Gajos as Mikolah was also a great choice, loved his performance so very much. The music score of the movie was exactly amazing as the first one and exactly how it's supposed to be, Zbigniew Preisner did a fantastic job on composing the music score of the trilogy, great choice of music. The ending of the movie was so very amazing and unpredictable. Never thought the movie would end that way, can't say much about that part but all I can say is it's a ‘'Beautiful Revenge''. White is for sure the weakest one of the trilogy, I didn't find it satisfying as the first one ‘'Blue'' or I didn't connect to it as much as I did with ‘'Blue'', I kind of felt like White got out of the theme that the trilogy is supposed to follow, or the story that the trilogy is supposed to follow but the movie itself is still interesting and worth watching. Great movie and a great story. My rating is: 8/10

    Another amazing movie of the three colors trilogy, not the best one of the trilogy and not as good as the first one but the movie itself was great. Karol Karol is a Polish immigrant who got divorced from his French wife Dominique. Karol is now forced to leave France after losing his wife, the business he and she jointly owned, his house and his money. One day, Karol meets a Polish expatriate called: Mikolah who smuggles him back to their homeland and from there Karol starts to build his new life. White was a movie that I absolutely enjoyed, the 1st act of the film made me wonder what will happen next so I was curious to know where the movie will take me, but when the 2nd act came on, I felt like I was getting bored and the movie started to get cold, but the 3rd act saved the movie and I really loved it. Zbigniew Zamachowski's performance as Karol Karol was good, he gave us that character who acts dumb but you'll never expect what will come out of him. good performance but I feel like another actor would have given us a better performance. Julie Delpy as Dominique was a great choice although she did appear in just a few scenes except at the end. Janusz Gajos as Mikolah was also a great choice, loved his performance so very much. The music score of the movie was exactly amazing as the first one and exactly how it's supposed to be, Zbigniew Preisner did a fantastic job on composing the music score of the trilogy, great choice of music. The ending of the movie was so very amazing and unpredictable. Never thought the movie would end that way, can't say much about that part but all I can say is it's a ‘'Beautiful Revenge''. White is for sure the weakest one of the trilogy, I didn't find it satisfying as the first one ‘'Blue'' or I didn't connect to it as much as I did with ‘'Blue'', I kind of felt like White got out of the theme that the trilogy is supposed to follow, or the story that the trilogy is supposed to follow but the movie itself is still interesting and worth watching. Great movie and a great story. My rating is: 8/10

  • Jul 30, 2020

    A film whose ultime theme is that of thinking revenge is a form of equality. Pretentious but interesting nonetheless

    A film whose ultime theme is that of thinking revenge is a form of equality. Pretentious but interesting nonetheless

  • May 06, 2019

    This was my second favorite film in the Three Colors trilogy although it is unfair to compare them because they are so different in style and tone. This one is a so-called ï¿ 1/2~anti-comedy' in that it sets up the audience to expect humor but never really follows through, the irony of this is meant to be humor in itself. This really is a terrifically funny film, not something I expected after the dour mood of Blue, with some great lines about the protagonist's hairdressing ability, a funny almost slapstick scene in which our protagonist stows himself away in a suitcase and an absurd moment in which a woman believes her ex-husband has come back from the dead and decides to sleep with him. There is an undercurrent of sadness throughout the film though as we realize that this man is unable to let go of his love for a woman, even if she is conniving and would happily let him burn in hell. The humorously named Karol Karol, Zbgniew Zamachowski, is a Polish hairdresser living in France whose wife Dominique, Julie Delpy, divorces him and humiliates him by describing his impotence in court. He is left with nothing after the divorce and has a strong desire to return to Poland. How he does so is one of the funniest parts of the film and he ends up back in his hometown where he and his brother continue hairdressing. The man who helped Karol get to Poland in the first place, Mikolaj, Janusz Gajos, requests that Karol kill him, what occurs next is life affirming. Through various harebrained schemes Karol gains enough power to follow through on his ultimate plan to get revenge on Dominique. The film is humorous because it plays on expectations and stereotypes, it creates characters who appear thin but have surprisingly complex emotions and feelings. The attempted killing scene could very easily be mishandled by any other director but Kieslowski finds the balance between the humor of Karol's shock and the darkness of a man who seemingly has everything wanting to kill himself. The scene also manages to feel uplifting in another twists that is shockingly affecting and emotionally resonant where in other films this shift would have felt abrupt and just rather odd. The performances are also fantastic at balancing the darkness and light as Zamachowski, primarily known as a dramatic actor, manages to be an affable comedic lead. His appearance as an innocent guileless man is deceptive because he is able to be extremely crafty and manipulative when he really wants something and as stated many times in the film he is a great hairdresser. When he is able to manipulate his bosses we cheer for him but when he manipulates Dominique we begin to see how dark his ambitions really are. At the end of the film he feels he has lost everything again as he witnesses, Dominique, the only thing he really wanted as she cries in a prison cell. He stares up at her with tears in his eyes and something is exchanged between them that seems an awful lot like love. What a statement, that two people can still love another after putting each other though hell. The sense of place is beautifully captured here as Karol's desire for the safety and ï¿ 1/2~warmth' of Poland compared to the strange, alien France where he can barely understand those around him plays a major part in the plot. Yes, it is humorous when Karol stands above a small Polish town that looks like it's situated in the middle of nowhere and is perennially frozen but the expression on his face is one of utter joy. This may be Kieslowski's own statement in that he understands how Poland could appear to other people and the limitations of the country and yet he loves it completely. This is a great film, one of the best examples of comedy I have seen, and although it's a clichï¿ 1/2 (C) phrase it will make you laugh and cry at once with it's smart observations and devastating portrait of love. If you want to jump into European cinema this is probably a good introduction because it appeals to Western sensibilities while also being entirely about the interaction between the different European nations.

    This was my second favorite film in the Three Colors trilogy although it is unfair to compare them because they are so different in style and tone. This one is a so-called ï¿ 1/2~anti-comedy' in that it sets up the audience to expect humor but never really follows through, the irony of this is meant to be humor in itself. This really is a terrifically funny film, not something I expected after the dour mood of Blue, with some great lines about the protagonist's hairdressing ability, a funny almost slapstick scene in which our protagonist stows himself away in a suitcase and an absurd moment in which a woman believes her ex-husband has come back from the dead and decides to sleep with him. There is an undercurrent of sadness throughout the film though as we realize that this man is unable to let go of his love for a woman, even if she is conniving and would happily let him burn in hell. The humorously named Karol Karol, Zbgniew Zamachowski, is a Polish hairdresser living in France whose wife Dominique, Julie Delpy, divorces him and humiliates him by describing his impotence in court. He is left with nothing after the divorce and has a strong desire to return to Poland. How he does so is one of the funniest parts of the film and he ends up back in his hometown where he and his brother continue hairdressing. The man who helped Karol get to Poland in the first place, Mikolaj, Janusz Gajos, requests that Karol kill him, what occurs next is life affirming. Through various harebrained schemes Karol gains enough power to follow through on his ultimate plan to get revenge on Dominique. The film is humorous because it plays on expectations and stereotypes, it creates characters who appear thin but have surprisingly complex emotions and feelings. The attempted killing scene could very easily be mishandled by any other director but Kieslowski finds the balance between the humor of Karol's shock and the darkness of a man who seemingly has everything wanting to kill himself. The scene also manages to feel uplifting in another twists that is shockingly affecting and emotionally resonant where in other films this shift would have felt abrupt and just rather odd. The performances are also fantastic at balancing the darkness and light as Zamachowski, primarily known as a dramatic actor, manages to be an affable comedic lead. His appearance as an innocent guileless man is deceptive because he is able to be extremely crafty and manipulative when he really wants something and as stated many times in the film he is a great hairdresser. When he is able to manipulate his bosses we cheer for him but when he manipulates Dominique we begin to see how dark his ambitions really are. At the end of the film he feels he has lost everything again as he witnesses, Dominique, the only thing he really wanted as she cries in a prison cell. He stares up at her with tears in his eyes and something is exchanged between them that seems an awful lot like love. What a statement, that two people can still love another after putting each other though hell. The sense of place is beautifully captured here as Karol's desire for the safety and ï¿ 1/2~warmth' of Poland compared to the strange, alien France where he can barely understand those around him plays a major part in the plot. Yes, it is humorous when Karol stands above a small Polish town that looks like it's situated in the middle of nowhere and is perennially frozen but the expression on his face is one of utter joy. This may be Kieslowski's own statement in that he understands how Poland could appear to other people and the limitations of the country and yet he loves it completely. This is a great film, one of the best examples of comedy I have seen, and although it's a clichï¿ 1/2 (C) phrase it will make you laugh and cry at once with it's smart observations and devastating portrait of love. If you want to jump into European cinema this is probably a good introduction because it appeals to Western sensibilities while also being entirely about the interaction between the different European nations.

  • Dec 12, 2018

    Of the trio of Three Colors movies, White is probably the strangest. It feels like Blue and Red have a theme at the core of the plot, and yet have less of a traditional narrative to those plots. On the flipside, White lacks a clear thematic core, but has a narrative that is simple to follow. Ordinarily I would appreciate the more focused storytelling in White, but this film lacked something for me. I think the journey of Karol (the main character) is tough for me to accept. He begins the film as a sympathetic character who I want to see overcome his difficult situation. But his arc in this film is one that has a downward trajectory so he becomes progressively less sympathetic over time. There were also a few moments in this film that were far-fetched and even comical, which didn’t fit with the tone of the rest of this film or the rest of the series. I still was intrigued by the story, and I wanted to see if the central relationship would be reconciled or doomed, but the payoff at the end was underwhelming at best. It seems that, similar to Blue, this chapter of the trilogy is reliant on the final chapter to give any kind of closure to the story, even if that closure is minimal and rushed. I didn’t dislike Three Colors: White, and it was a relatively easy watch for me, because I never felt the boredom that threatened to overtake me in Blue. But there were some problems in the story-telling, and the style simply wasn’t as elegant in White, so it is probably my least-favorite part of the trilogy of films.

    Of the trio of Three Colors movies, White is probably the strangest. It feels like Blue and Red have a theme at the core of the plot, and yet have less of a traditional narrative to those plots. On the flipside, White lacks a clear thematic core, but has a narrative that is simple to follow. Ordinarily I would appreciate the more focused storytelling in White, but this film lacked something for me. I think the journey of Karol (the main character) is tough for me to accept. He begins the film as a sympathetic character who I want to see overcome his difficult situation. But his arc in this film is one that has a downward trajectory so he becomes progressively less sympathetic over time. There were also a few moments in this film that were far-fetched and even comical, which didn’t fit with the tone of the rest of this film or the rest of the series. I still was intrigued by the story, and I wanted to see if the central relationship would be reconciled or doomed, but the payoff at the end was underwhelming at best. It seems that, similar to Blue, this chapter of the trilogy is reliant on the final chapter to give any kind of closure to the story, even if that closure is minimal and rushed. I didn’t dislike Three Colors: White, and it was a relatively easy watch for me, because I never felt the boredom that threatened to overtake me in Blue. But there were some problems in the story-telling, and the style simply wasn’t as elegant in White, so it is probably my least-favorite part of the trilogy of films.

  • Nov 06, 2018

    with good intentions.. Trois Couleurs: White Kieslowski's bittersweet love track is probably the most apt description of the ups and downs that a marriage goes through retold in a metaphorical satire. And the exaggeration that is captured in here is equally practical as much as cinematic it is. With essential husky bits and unexpected thrills, this is the most balanced and bold tale walking on a thin wire that is purely provocative with a scoreboard mentality. From a penny to a palace, this tale has multiple tales resided within where the actual overall arc is projected in the backdrop of all this distraction, where Kieslowski discloses his intentions in its last frame and shows you how he has been fiddling with you subconsciously. And the best part is, you'd want him to play with your feelings in here. Driving such plethora of emotions on one seat, one perspective, similar to its predecessor, this is an ace in the hole. The narration is gripping and busier than the previous one. It has so much to tell within 90 minutes, that it has to play the rules smartly and calculatively, for the makers wouldn't want the audience to grow hectic. Hence, wisely the cinematography is sensible accordingly and the camera work is stable for the most time. Zamachowski, the protagonist, is being played at, and does play by. His evolution is tremendously breathtaking. The work and the detail went by, in its first act itself tells you that you are in a ride of your life. And fortunately, he has got a range to be funny and adorable, to be scare and sinister, and with those big eyes he is clearly expressive in his role. Delpy on the other hand doesn't get much to do, yet she holds on to her part convincingly. Trois Couleurs: White is as pale as it can be and is least diplomatic as it can be, it is a bullet fired from the gun, with good intentions.

    with good intentions.. Trois Couleurs: White Kieslowski's bittersweet love track is probably the most apt description of the ups and downs that a marriage goes through retold in a metaphorical satire. And the exaggeration that is captured in here is equally practical as much as cinematic it is. With essential husky bits and unexpected thrills, this is the most balanced and bold tale walking on a thin wire that is purely provocative with a scoreboard mentality. From a penny to a palace, this tale has multiple tales resided within where the actual overall arc is projected in the backdrop of all this distraction, where Kieslowski discloses his intentions in its last frame and shows you how he has been fiddling with you subconsciously. And the best part is, you'd want him to play with your feelings in here. Driving such plethora of emotions on one seat, one perspective, similar to its predecessor, this is an ace in the hole. The narration is gripping and busier than the previous one. It has so much to tell within 90 minutes, that it has to play the rules smartly and calculatively, for the makers wouldn't want the audience to grow hectic. Hence, wisely the cinematography is sensible accordingly and the camera work is stable for the most time. Zamachowski, the protagonist, is being played at, and does play by. His evolution is tremendously breathtaking. The work and the detail went by, in its first act itself tells you that you are in a ride of your life. And fortunately, he has got a range to be funny and adorable, to be scare and sinister, and with those big eyes he is clearly expressive in his role. Delpy on the other hand doesn't get much to do, yet she holds on to her part convincingly. Trois Couleurs: White is as pale as it can be and is least diplomatic as it can be, it is a bullet fired from the gun, with good intentions.

  • May 26, 2018

    As vezes engraçado, as vezes triste, este filme desanda pela segunda parte, mas ao todo é belo e com personagens imprevisíveis.

    As vezes engraçado, as vezes triste, este filme desanda pela segunda parte, mas ao todo é belo e com personagens imprevisíveis.

  • May 07, 2018

    Filme fodão. Cheio de reviravoltas e mensagens para se pensar,

    Filme fodão. Cheio de reviravoltas e mensagens para se pensar,

  • Nov 03, 2017

    Three Colors: White is much inferior to its predecessor. It is well acted and I liked the first act. But the rest was just not good. The film then went into odd black comedy territory and that just did not work for me as it wasn't funny and it wasn't interesting too. It's a weak sequel.

    Three Colors: White is much inferior to its predecessor. It is well acted and I liked the first act. But the rest was just not good. The film then went into odd black comedy territory and that just did not work for me as it wasn't funny and it wasn't interesting too. It's a weak sequel.

  • Mar 06, 2017

    Part of the amazing trilogy Red/White/Blue that rocked the 90's french auteur cinema, this 'episode' is absolutely amazing. Once again written and directed by a master of observation of the human condition, this film explores the relationships of a man and his wife with such an incredible realism, it's inimitable. The acting is superb and one gets quickly fascinated by the way the story is being told. Great film from a master.

    Part of the amazing trilogy Red/White/Blue that rocked the 90's french auteur cinema, this 'episode' is absolutely amazing. Once again written and directed by a master of observation of the human condition, this film explores the relationships of a man and his wife with such an incredible realism, it's inimitable. The acting is superb and one gets quickly fascinated by the way the story is being told. Great film from a master.

  • Jan 12, 2017

    Comic, erotic, and symmetrical story about the marriage between a Pole and a Frenchwoman, allegorical stand ins for Eastern and Western Europe.

    Comic, erotic, and symmetrical story about the marriage between a Pole and a Frenchwoman, allegorical stand ins for Eastern and Western Europe.