Tikkun Reviews

  • Dec 23, 2016

    What a disappointment. I know how much work it takes to make a film. Why would anyone expend so much time and energy on a film about nothing. At least Seinfeld's "nothing" had redeeming value in that it made you feel good. This move was upsetting and proved to be worthless in the end. High brow critics mistook long, drawn-out wide shots for good cinematography and good acting on silence and no movement. I spent the last two hours waiting for something that came highly recommended by people who think they know what makes for good cinema. Sometimes you have to follow your own path.

    What a disappointment. I know how much work it takes to make a film. Why would anyone expend so much time and energy on a film about nothing. At least Seinfeld's "nothing" had redeeming value in that it made you feel good. This move was upsetting and proved to be worthless in the end. High brow critics mistook long, drawn-out wide shots for good cinematography and good acting on silence and no movement. I spent the last two hours waiting for something that came highly recommended by people who think they know what makes for good cinema. Sometimes you have to follow your own path.

  • Jun 18, 2016

    This Israelite film is a bleak spiritual allegory, that's consistently fascinating, if perhaps a bit too opaque for its own good. Director/writer Avishai Sivan shoots his film with a steady and deliberate sense of craft that often recalls Tarkovsky, even if he's more displaying of humor (albeit the extremely deadpan variety). Tikkun is a challenging film with Kafka-esque images around every turn, and while it's themes regarding Judaism may fly over the heads of those not familiar with the faith, it's pedagogical inferences come off as mostly profound. Some story elements aren't quite developed as they should be, but Tikkun is an accomplished debut work from a quickly-maturing artist.

    This Israelite film is a bleak spiritual allegory, that's consistently fascinating, if perhaps a bit too opaque for its own good. Director/writer Avishai Sivan shoots his film with a steady and deliberate sense of craft that often recalls Tarkovsky, even if he's more displaying of humor (albeit the extremely deadpan variety). Tikkun is a challenging film with Kafka-esque images around every turn, and while it's themes regarding Judaism may fly over the heads of those not familiar with the faith, it's pedagogical inferences come off as mostly profound. Some story elements aren't quite developed as they should be, but Tikkun is an accomplished debut work from a quickly-maturing artist.

  • Jun 14, 2016

    Absorbing, unique, beautifully acted, i.e. realistic for the minority segment of Chassidic people who suffer living the religious life.

    Absorbing, unique, beautifully acted, i.e. realistic for the minority segment of Chassidic people who suffer living the religious life.