Time Out (L' Emploi du temps) Reviews

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October 15, 2009
November 1, 2007
Time Out is stylish and hushed, at once suspenseful and melancholy. It can't be neatly fitted into a genre, just as its hero--played with devastating understatement by Recoing--can't be easily dismissed as a psycho or a villain.
January 16, 2003
August 2, 2002
Time Out is as serious as a pink slip. And more than that, it's an observant, unfussily poetic meditation about identity and alienation.
May 10, 2002
The drama discloses almost nothing.
May 10, 2002
What a modern horror story!
May 10, 2002
Human Resources was a good, straightforward tale, but Time Out is better. It's haunting. It's like a poem.
May 10, 2002
Moody, reflective and acutely noticing, Time Out is less a drama than a cinematic essay about one man's experience in an era defined for professional and laborer by downsizing.
May 10, 2002
Time Out is existential drama without any of the pretension associated with the term.
May 9, 2002
As bizarre as it is, Vincent's gradual estrangement from society is also easy to identify with, which makes Time Out especially compelling.
May 3, 2002
From those first moments behind the windshield, Time Out draws you into its world of quiet deception.
May 3, 2002
Skip work to see it at the first opportunity.
May 2, 2002
A sad, visually stunning commentary on life in the new economy, Time Out does two things very well.
April 26, 2002
Cantet beautifully illuminates what it means sometimes to be inside looking out, and at other times outside looking in.
April 19, 2002
I admire the closing scenes of the film, which seem to ask whether our civilization offers a cure for Vincent's complaint.
April 19, 2002
A taut psychological thriller that doesn't waste a moment of its two-hour running time.
April 18, 2002
Writer-director Cantet, the filmmaker responsible for the similarly provocative Human Resources, has an extremely arid sensibility.
April 12, 2002
Time Out is not just an especially subtle and thoughtful psychological drama, it's a provocative, even an unnerving one as well.
April 11, 2002
In its treatment of the dehumanizing and ego-destroying process of unemployment, Time Out offers an exploration that is more accurate than anything I have seen in an American film.
April 11, 2002
Cantet is singularly skilled at evoking the universal condition of such tragic ordinariness.
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