To Hell and Back: The Kane Hodder Story Reviews

  • Jul 17, 2019

    Something new to learn about a legendary icon.

    Something new to learn about a legendary icon.

  • Jan 02, 2019

    Excellent he is also the nicest man you will ever meet so wonderful to his fan's Kane is the man.

    Excellent he is also the nicest man you will ever meet so wonderful to his fan's Kane is the man.

  • Jul 15, 2018

    "To Hell And Back" is a deeply personal and intense account of the horror icon's journey through his darkest moments. From childhood bullying that reaches some truly violent, heart breaking episodes, right up to the gut-wrenching and harrowing experience as a severe burn survivor. The documentary is more than fangasm, it offers a level of realism and humanism that expands beyond the parameters of the horror genre fandom - all with Kane Hodder as the primary story telling offering a first-person account of his life. Friends of the legend offer up moments and feelings of their relationship with Hodder. The selling point for me, and probably most fans, is the one on one feel you get as Hodder is center stage for the majority of the documentary, giving his story as only he could tell. Especially his recounting of being burnt severely during an impromptu demo with a standard fire stunt. An accident that nearly killed him, and as the title states- sent him to "hell and back". This is a documentary worth seeing and for any fan of Hodder, his work and his life, one to add to the collection.

    "To Hell And Back" is a deeply personal and intense account of the horror icon's journey through his darkest moments. From childhood bullying that reaches some truly violent, heart breaking episodes, right up to the gut-wrenching and harrowing experience as a severe burn survivor. The documentary is more than fangasm, it offers a level of realism and humanism that expands beyond the parameters of the horror genre fandom - all with Kane Hodder as the primary story telling offering a first-person account of his life. Friends of the legend offer up moments and feelings of their relationship with Hodder. The selling point for me, and probably most fans, is the one on one feel you get as Hodder is center stage for the majority of the documentary, giving his story as only he could tell. Especially his recounting of being burnt severely during an impromptu demo with a standard fire stunt. An accident that nearly killed him, and as the title states- sent him to "hell and back". This is a documentary worth seeing and for any fan of Hodder, his work and his life, one to add to the collection.

  • Jul 13, 2018

    Spectacular and truly touching Doc that is well crafted by Herbert. It takes into the life of this Horror icon and humanizes him like you would have never thought. Great support pieces as you travel through various interviews with more Horror Legends and at the core you start to feel not fear this time but compasion and inspiration. Great film and well captured Doc!

    Spectacular and truly touching Doc that is well crafted by Herbert. It takes into the life of this Horror icon and humanizes him like you would have never thought. Great support pieces as you travel through various interviews with more Horror Legends and at the core you start to feel not fear this time but compasion and inspiration. Great film and well captured Doc!

  • Jun 16, 2018

    This is a surprisingly good movie. Kane Hodder is a very funny, compassionate all around awesome human being. The stories he tells are the main force of this film. Starting with a tale of being bullied, through long, sometimes graphically excruciating accounts of a terrible full body burn stunt accident and onto the legends that made him the most iconic actor to take on the famous role of Jason Voorhees in some of the later Friday the 13th movies. The worst part was the incompetent doctors who almost killed him because they did not know what they were doing. The film is full of great interviews with fellow horror icons Robert Englund, Cassandra 'Elvira' Peterson, Bruce Campbell, Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, directors Adam Rifkin, Sean S. Cunningham, Adam Green, makeup artists, tattooists, old friends and family member. This is honestly one of the most thoroughly researched documentaries I've seen in a long time. According to the Q&A I attended with director Derek Dennis Herbert, they had thirty nine hours of footage with Kane alone. They were even able to get Kane to revisit the San Francisco Burn Unit that saved his life over 40 years ago. This is not a fluffy nostalgic puff piece about a horror movie actor. There is real emotional healing in those scenes. I was considering sharing a trailer for some of the PTSD facebook groups I belonged to, but I don't think a trigger warning would be enough to prepare some of the members for the endless scenes of hardcore movie violence. I enjoyed horror movies as a teenager a lot. But I've had to walk out of horror movies in more recent years because of my PTSD. This film is unexpected, and I wish there was more that I could do to help it get the attention and praise it deserves. It does get a bit long at times, especially for a theatrical film, but I still have to give it my highest recommendation. So sayeth the King of Funny Faces.

    This is a surprisingly good movie. Kane Hodder is a very funny, compassionate all around awesome human being. The stories he tells are the main force of this film. Starting with a tale of being bullied, through long, sometimes graphically excruciating accounts of a terrible full body burn stunt accident and onto the legends that made him the most iconic actor to take on the famous role of Jason Voorhees in some of the later Friday the 13th movies. The worst part was the incompetent doctors who almost killed him because they did not know what they were doing. The film is full of great interviews with fellow horror icons Robert Englund, Cassandra 'Elvira' Peterson, Bruce Campbell, Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, directors Adam Rifkin, Sean S. Cunningham, Adam Green, makeup artists, tattooists, old friends and family member. This is honestly one of the most thoroughly researched documentaries I've seen in a long time. According to the Q&A I attended with director Derek Dennis Herbert, they had thirty nine hours of footage with Kane alone. They were even able to get Kane to revisit the San Francisco Burn Unit that saved his life over 40 years ago. This is not a fluffy nostalgic puff piece about a horror movie actor. There is real emotional healing in those scenes. I was considering sharing a trailer for some of the PTSD facebook groups I belonged to, but I don't think a trigger warning would be enough to prepare some of the members for the endless scenes of hardcore movie violence. I enjoyed horror movies as a teenager a lot. But I've had to walk out of horror movies in more recent years because of my PTSD. This film is unexpected, and I wish there was more that I could do to help it get the attention and praise it deserves. It does get a bit long at times, especially for a theatrical film, but I still have to give it my highest recommendation. So sayeth the King of Funny Faces.