To Live and Die in L.A. 1985

To Live and Die in L.A.

Critics Consensus

With coke fiends, car chases, and Wang Chung galore, To Live and Die in L.A. is perhaps the ultimate '80s action/thriller.

91%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 35

78%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 10,519
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To Live and Die in L.A. Photos

Movie Info

When his longtime partner on the force is killed, reckless U.S. Secret Service agent Richard Chance (William L. Petersen) vows revenge, setting out to nab dangerous counterfeit artist Eric Masters (Willem Dafoe). Along with his new, straitlaced partner, John Vukovich (John Pankow), Chance sets up a scheme to entrap Masters, resulting in the accidental death of an undercover officer. As Chance's desire for justice becomes an obsession, Vukovich questions the lawless methods he employs.

Cast & Crew

William Petersen
Richard Chance
Willem Dafoe
Eric 'Rick' Masters
John Pankow
John Vukovich
Debra Feuer
Bianca Torres
Robert Downey Sr.
Thomas Bateman
Samuel Schulman
Executive Producer
Darren Costin
Original Music
Wang Chung
Original Music
Robby Müller
Cinematographer
Bud S. Smith
Film Editor
Lilly Kilvert
Production Design
Show all Cast & Crew

Critic Reviews for To Live and Die in L.A.

All Critics (35) | Top Critics (6) | Fresh (32) | Rotten (3)

Audience Reviews for To Live and Die in L.A.

  • Mar 21, 2013
    Explicit business depth on both sides of the crime drama about counterfeiting. How original. The chase sequence on the wrong side of the freeway has thrills too.
    Max G Super Reviewer
  • Nov 29, 2011
    William Friedkin is a fantastic director. He can surely make a bad film, but when he's working with a good script, magic can be made. "To Live and Die in L.A." is nothing remarkable in turns of plot development, although there are a fair share of twists and turns, but the ferocity with which it is directed is astounding. Such an involving crime film.
    Stephen E Super Reviewer
  • Oct 28, 2011
    Friedkin gives us one of the best Crime Dramas I have ever seen! This is such a great movie and I cannot believe it has taken me this long to see it!
    Jason R Super Reviewer
  • Oct 23, 2011
    William Friedkin is a fantastic director. He sets up the entire scene like a painter, adding detail to every single inch. You can always find something new in each shot. It's artistry like that that mesmerizes the hell out of me. I was also deeply impressed by the pure complexity of To Live and Die in L.A. At the beginning of the famous car chase scene, there's this shot that rises from Chance's car, up along the highway, meets up with the red car in pursuit of Chance, then moves back to Chance's car. And all of this is going on while the cars are going at top speeds. Maybe I'm just biased towards crime films. Crime is a genre that typically impresses me. The characters are always easy to get involved with, the storyline is typically riveting, and all of the technical aspects are usually right on par with everything else. William Friedkin is a director that has mastered this genre, and I've only seen two of his films. I think I might add him to my "Favorite Directors" list.
    Stephen E Super Reviewer

To Live and Die in L.A. Quotes

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