Tomorrow, When the War Began Reviews

  • Oct 13, 2018

    This movie is so bad

    This movie is so bad

  • Sep 14, 2018

    Its like Hone & Away, but with guns. We never get to understand who the "others" are. All seems pretty rushed, and its a bit dull.

    Its like Hone & Away, but with guns. We never get to understand who the "others" are. All seems pretty rushed, and its a bit dull.

  • Sep 12, 2018

    Not read the books but this is a pretty poor film

    Not read the books but this is a pretty poor film

  • Aug 08, 2018

    It's probably a case where the book is better than the movie. This lame Aussie knock-off of Wolverines fails to deliver on a number of fronts. They never identify the attackers for one thing. They're Asian, that's all you know. I won't criticize the acting; it was passable. But the writing and direction are just awful. Imaigine this. Two teen-age girls have just stolen a gas tanker to use to blow up a bridge used by the enemy. The enemy was firing on them and pursuing. When they reach their target, they are supposed to wait for a signal from their comrades. Instead of waiting carefully and being alert? The engage in idle chit-chat about girl stuff. Even smiling and laughing. As enemy soldiers creep up on them. And they have turned their radio off. That's what they're waiting for, right? A signal? Not even teen-aged girls are that stupid.

    It's probably a case where the book is better than the movie. This lame Aussie knock-off of Wolverines fails to deliver on a number of fronts. They never identify the attackers for one thing. They're Asian, that's all you know. I won't criticize the acting; it was passable. But the writing and direction are just awful. Imaigine this. Two teen-age girls have just stolen a gas tanker to use to blow up a bridge used by the enemy. The enemy was firing on them and pursuing. When they reach their target, they are supposed to wait for a signal from their comrades. Instead of waiting carefully and being alert? The engage in idle chit-chat about girl stuff. Even smiling and laughing. As enemy soldiers creep up on them. And they have turned their radio off. That's what they're waiting for, right? A signal? Not even teen-aged girls are that stupid.

  • Jul 27, 2018

    Anachronistic piece of s**t, stoking and building up on fears, which were already ridiculous half a century ago.

    Anachronistic piece of s**t, stoking and building up on fears, which were already ridiculous half a century ago.

  • Jul 14, 2017

    I loved it. It's mossing one star because they didn't make the rest of the story

    I loved it. It's mossing one star because they didn't make the rest of the story

  • Mar 26, 2017

    The acting was awful. Clothes were perfect and clean like they were off a rack. Kids living out bush with not even an insect bite? The 'farmers' labouring and they don't even sport tans. Odd how they are complaining of heat but they aren't sweating in their faces. The movie is awful. It's scattered and not in sequence like the book. Just don't bother. Read the book instead. The movie is an insult to the author.

    The acting was awful. Clothes were perfect and clean like they were off a rack. Kids living out bush with not even an insect bite? The 'farmers' labouring and they don't even sport tans. Odd how they are complaining of heat but they aren't sweating in their faces. The movie is awful. It's scattered and not in sequence like the book. Just don't bother. Read the book instead. The movie is an insult to the author.

  • Dec 04, 2016

    An Australian Red Dawn. Call me crazy but this is not only a better film than the awful Red Dawn remake but it's a step up from the original as well. However, it reeks of YA formula and an attempt to build a non-existent franchise.

    An Australian Red Dawn. Call me crazy but this is not only a better film than the awful Red Dawn remake but it's a step up from the original as well. However, it reeks of YA formula and an attempt to build a non-existent franchise.

  • Apr 03, 2016

    Although Not a horrible film, it is a blatant rip off of the movie Red Dawn. The film is decent and not trerribly written, however it lacks the ability to draw you in and make you want more.

    Although Not a horrible film, it is a blatant rip off of the movie Red Dawn. The film is decent and not trerribly written, however it lacks the ability to draw you in and make you want more.

  • Feb 28, 2016

    It is widely believed that the United Stated of America is the land of the free, however in Australia we know better. Our vivid, vast and high unique country envelops its inhabitants; both adults and children alike, in a wonderful sense of security. But what happens when that is taken away? Hailed in 2000 by the American Literary Association as one of the top 100 books written for teenagers, Tomorrow When the War Began is the first in a series of seven novels by acclaimed Australian author John Marsden. Australia's first major action movie aimed at teenagers, the adaptation has taken creative liberties with some characters but effectively captures the books essence. In the small coastal town of Wirawee, seven teenagers in an end of summer trip decide the let their hair down in true Aussies style; by camping. Exploring deep into the dense bush, the group discovers an idyllic remote location ripe for hunting, shelter and fun in affectionately named, Hell. Naïve to the fact that their lives have been altered forever however, the teens return home to find their families missing, their animals perishing and all forms of communications cut-off. Logically and systematically returning to each family home they find no answers, so the troop decides to investigate why only the local fair ground and hospital show any form of activity. The realisation that Australia has been invaded by a foreign power hits only to hard when Ellie (Caitlin Stasey) witnesses cold-blooded murder through the fence of these makeshift concentration camps. Shocked she inadvertently exposes the group and they return to the safety of Hell. After picking up another escapee; the clueless and careless, Chris (Andrew Ryan), the group bands together to make a plan action. Concluding they must put away childish notions and learn to fight, survive and attack the unknown enemy if they wish to outlast the war no-one knew was coming. Screen writer Stuart Beattie (Australia, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End) embraces his directorial debut, casting first time motion picture actors Caitlin Stasey (Neighbours), Phoebe Tonkin (Packed to the Rafters) and Lincoln Lewis (Home and Away). The film suffers slightly from a mismatched soundtrack, over acting and overt typecasting, but it is the first; with two sequels based the later books already in the pipelines hopeful a little bit more depth of character will be explored. Such a familiar premise (i.e. Red Dawn 1984), Tomorrow When the War Began stands out mostly due to its location and simplicity. Rather than allowing the teens to instantly become self-confident warriors with no fear, it shows them as vulnerable children attempting to survive and rebel. The cinematography is refreshing. Avoiding shaking camera, perplexing cuts and massively overdone action sequences, this movie embraces the smaller things, giving viewers time to absorb its content. The Verdict: This long-awaited film will not only satisfy the memory of avid teen readers from the 90s, but also showcase Australia's young acting talent, writing talent, film making abilities and beautiful scenery. Published: The Queanbeyan Age Date of Publication: 10/09/2010

    It is widely believed that the United Stated of America is the land of the free, however in Australia we know better. Our vivid, vast and high unique country envelops its inhabitants; both adults and children alike, in a wonderful sense of security. But what happens when that is taken away? Hailed in 2000 by the American Literary Association as one of the top 100 books written for teenagers, Tomorrow When the War Began is the first in a series of seven novels by acclaimed Australian author John Marsden. Australia's first major action movie aimed at teenagers, the adaptation has taken creative liberties with some characters but effectively captures the books essence. In the small coastal town of Wirawee, seven teenagers in an end of summer trip decide the let their hair down in true Aussies style; by camping. Exploring deep into the dense bush, the group discovers an idyllic remote location ripe for hunting, shelter and fun in affectionately named, Hell. Naïve to the fact that their lives have been altered forever however, the teens return home to find their families missing, their animals perishing and all forms of communications cut-off. Logically and systematically returning to each family home they find no answers, so the troop decides to investigate why only the local fair ground and hospital show any form of activity. The realisation that Australia has been invaded by a foreign power hits only to hard when Ellie (Caitlin Stasey) witnesses cold-blooded murder through the fence of these makeshift concentration camps. Shocked she inadvertently exposes the group and they return to the safety of Hell. After picking up another escapee; the clueless and careless, Chris (Andrew Ryan), the group bands together to make a plan action. Concluding they must put away childish notions and learn to fight, survive and attack the unknown enemy if they wish to outlast the war no-one knew was coming. Screen writer Stuart Beattie (Australia, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End) embraces his directorial debut, casting first time motion picture actors Caitlin Stasey (Neighbours), Phoebe Tonkin (Packed to the Rafters) and Lincoln Lewis (Home and Away). The film suffers slightly from a mismatched soundtrack, over acting and overt typecasting, but it is the first; with two sequels based the later books already in the pipelines hopeful a little bit more depth of character will be explored. Such a familiar premise (i.e. Red Dawn 1984), Tomorrow When the War Began stands out mostly due to its location and simplicity. Rather than allowing the teens to instantly become self-confident warriors with no fear, it shows them as vulnerable children attempting to survive and rebel. The cinematography is refreshing. Avoiding shaking camera, perplexing cuts and massively overdone action sequences, this movie embraces the smaller things, giving viewers time to absorb its content. The Verdict: This long-awaited film will not only satisfy the memory of avid teen readers from the 90s, but also showcase Australia's young acting talent, writing talent, film making abilities and beautiful scenery. Published: The Queanbeyan Age Date of Publication: 10/09/2010