Transpecos Reviews

  • Jul 03, 2018

    A fine film with strong acting and excellent cinematography. Barebones and lean, with a minimal cast. A simple, tough tale of the border, well told. Clifton Collins, Jr. is always good. The dialogue taut and sparse. This is well worth a watch. ****/*****.

    A fine film with strong acting and excellent cinematography. Barebones and lean, with a minimal cast. A simple, tough tale of the border, well told. Clifton Collins, Jr. is always good. The dialogue taut and sparse. This is well worth a watch. ****/*****.

  • May 29, 2018

    Heavy In Content & Incredibly Thorough In The Story-Telling. A Simple, On-Location Barrenness Leaves The Characters To Rely Almost Entirely On Their Talents To Pull This Off..They Pretty Much Do, It Left Me Thinking About The Job These Guys Must Do, Day-In..Day-Out, With Little Commendation, Barring The Occasional Cluster-Fk..Of Which This Is A Focus Upon.

    Heavy In Content & Incredibly Thorough In The Story-Telling. A Simple, On-Location Barrenness Leaves The Characters To Rely Almost Entirely On Their Talents To Pull This Off..They Pretty Much Do, It Left Me Thinking About The Job These Guys Must Do, Day-In..Day-Out, With Little Commendation, Barring The Occasional Cluster-Fk..Of Which This Is A Focus Upon.

  • Apr 01, 2018

    A small off beat and extremely simple and straight forward film on boarders, choices, friendships, and the truth you find in moments in yourself when presented in heightened moments. A peaceful tapestry that winds into lonliness and sorrow as we dive deeper into this story. Collins is great and the others truly work towards the common goal in this small slice that I hope more people see but most will forget. No big sweeping emotions but enough to hold you and wet the average days appetite.

    A small off beat and extremely simple and straight forward film on boarders, choices, friendships, and the truth you find in moments in yourself when presented in heightened moments. A peaceful tapestry that winds into lonliness and sorrow as we dive deeper into this story. Collins is great and the others truly work towards the common goal in this small slice that I hope more people see but most will forget. No big sweeping emotions but enough to hold you and wet the average days appetite.

  • Jesse O Super Reviewer
    Jun 26, 2017

    Life can be a fickle bitch. Sometimes your life can be exactly the way you want. You have a good job, good friends, a significant other that makes you happy (if that is what you so wish) and nothing can get you down from that high. Sometimes, however, things take a turn for the worse. And they take a turn for the worse very quickly. You may lose your job, your spouse and your house all in the span of several months. Sometimes there's even days where your life, or even several lives, fall apart in the matter of HOURS. This is what brings us to Transpecos. I will be upfront with you, as I usually am, of course. I thought this was a good movie. It was well-written, I thought the acting was damn strong, the setting was desolate to feel like everything that was happening was happening off the grid and away from prying eyes. That gave it a bit of a personal feeling, like you were watching something that you weren't meant to be seeing. I will also say that I like its more small-scale approach to its story. It focuses on three US border patrol agents, due to one of their own working on behalf of the cartel to protect his own family, and how they get involved into this drug trafficking business if, at least, for half a day. The thing I like about that is that, at least at a later point in the film, they bring up the boss of the cartel and how Flores (and Davis) can gain access to him to exact their plan of revenge on him. Or at least Flores' plans, since Davis got them into this situation in the first place. But the film, much like No Country for Old Men, doesn't really follow up on that. No Country spends the entire film building up to a confrontation between Bardem's character and Brolin's character and that confrontation simply never comes. Brolin's character dies off screen and Bardem just goes about his merry way killing everybody. I thought it was a genius approach to the typical western tropes. This movie isn't as masterfully executed as No Country, but it's the same similar approach. The third act seems to build up to Flores finally coming across with the man who led to the death of two of his colleagues and, again, that confrontation never comes. I've always liked that. While No Country did it to subvert the tropes associated with the western genre, I think this movie did it just to showcase that, sadly, one cannot bring down an entire organization, no matter how determined he is to do it. And I think that is, ultimately, what the film is about. One might say that it is a defeatist film, since Flores failed in his quest. But I find that it is anything but, Flores fought right until the very end to get to the cartel boss and make him pay for costing him his two co-workers' lives, but he was outnumbered and outgunned. Like I said earlier, one man cannot bring down an entire organization. Even if that organization might be small when compared to some of the really big cartels. Flores went as far as he could until his body just gave out on him. In a way, it's also a movie about not giving up regardless of what you may face. This is obviously not meant to be an uplifting sort of film, since these people from the cartel are still running around trafficking drugs and bribing agents to help get the drugs in the country easily. Even having said all of that, however, I found that the movie was just missing a certain something. I liked pretty much everything about the film, but I never loved anything about it. And I don't know why. You know how people say they're the jack of all trades, master of none. That's describes this movie. It's good at everything, great at nothing. That's why I only feel comfortable giving this three stars. It's good, for sure, but it never reaches the great territory. I can't give this a wholehearted recommendation, but it's still an enjoyable and well-made movie. This is the movie you watch when you can't find Hell or High Water anywhere else. I don't mean that derisively, but the similarities are obvious and one is clearly better than the other. That shouldn't dissuade you from giving this a shot if you really want to see it.

    Life can be a fickle bitch. Sometimes your life can be exactly the way you want. You have a good job, good friends, a significant other that makes you happy (if that is what you so wish) and nothing can get you down from that high. Sometimes, however, things take a turn for the worse. And they take a turn for the worse very quickly. You may lose your job, your spouse and your house all in the span of several months. Sometimes there's even days where your life, or even several lives, fall apart in the matter of HOURS. This is what brings us to Transpecos. I will be upfront with you, as I usually am, of course. I thought this was a good movie. It was well-written, I thought the acting was damn strong, the setting was desolate to feel like everything that was happening was happening off the grid and away from prying eyes. That gave it a bit of a personal feeling, like you were watching something that you weren't meant to be seeing. I will also say that I like its more small-scale approach to its story. It focuses on three US border patrol agents, due to one of their own working on behalf of the cartel to protect his own family, and how they get involved into this drug trafficking business if, at least, for half a day. The thing I like about that is that, at least at a later point in the film, they bring up the boss of the cartel and how Flores (and Davis) can gain access to him to exact their plan of revenge on him. Or at least Flores' plans, since Davis got them into this situation in the first place. But the film, much like No Country for Old Men, doesn't really follow up on that. No Country spends the entire film building up to a confrontation between Bardem's character and Brolin's character and that confrontation simply never comes. Brolin's character dies off screen and Bardem just goes about his merry way killing everybody. I thought it was a genius approach to the typical western tropes. This movie isn't as masterfully executed as No Country, but it's the same similar approach. The third act seems to build up to Flores finally coming across with the man who led to the death of two of his colleagues and, again, that confrontation never comes. I've always liked that. While No Country did it to subvert the tropes associated with the western genre, I think this movie did it just to showcase that, sadly, one cannot bring down an entire organization, no matter how determined he is to do it. And I think that is, ultimately, what the film is about. One might say that it is a defeatist film, since Flores failed in his quest. But I find that it is anything but, Flores fought right until the very end to get to the cartel boss and make him pay for costing him his two co-workers' lives, but he was outnumbered and outgunned. Like I said earlier, one man cannot bring down an entire organization. Even if that organization might be small when compared to some of the really big cartels. Flores went as far as he could until his body just gave out on him. In a way, it's also a movie about not giving up regardless of what you may face. This is obviously not meant to be an uplifting sort of film, since these people from the cartel are still running around trafficking drugs and bribing agents to help get the drugs in the country easily. Even having said all of that, however, I found that the movie was just missing a certain something. I liked pretty much everything about the film, but I never loved anything about it. And I don't know why. You know how people say they're the jack of all trades, master of none. That's describes this movie. It's good at everything, great at nothing. That's why I only feel comfortable giving this three stars. It's good, for sure, but it never reaches the great territory. I can't give this a wholehearted recommendation, but it's still an enjoyable and well-made movie. This is the movie you watch when you can't find Hell or High Water anywhere else. I don't mean that derisively, but the similarities are obvious and one is clearly better than the other. That shouldn't dissuade you from giving this a shot if you really want to see it.

  • Jun 23, 2017

    Great movie in the vein of Sicario. Well acted and believable.

    Great movie in the vein of Sicario. Well acted and believable.

  • May 18, 2017

    Really good film and good story

    Really good film and good story

  • May 16, 2017

    Proving you don't need a huge budget and big stars to make a terrific film. Pretty much comprising a bad day for border patrol and it's three main characters, loyalties are stretched to the max when an officer goes rogue. Wonderfully shot in wide open spaces like last year's Hell of High Water, this little gem simply glows

    Proving you don't need a huge budget and big stars to make a terrific film. Pretty much comprising a bad day for border patrol and it's three main characters, loyalties are stretched to the max when an officer goes rogue. Wonderfully shot in wide open spaces like last year's Hell of High Water, this little gem simply glows

  • Apr 07, 2017

    A solid film about 3 Border Patrol Agents and the Cartel. Nothing spectacular at all but it was worth a watch. Gabriel Luna does a good job.

    A solid film about 3 Border Patrol Agents and the Cartel. Nothing spectacular at all but it was worth a watch. Gabriel Luna does a good job.

  • Mar 03, 2017

    Horrible movie! Stupid decision after stupid decision, horrible story!

    Horrible movie! Stupid decision after stupid decision, horrible story!

  • Feb 09, 2017

    great film. powerful debut

    great film. powerful debut