Two Seconds - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Two Seconds Reviews

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September 20, 2014
eddie g makes this 1 go
Super Reviewer
½ January 29, 2010
An excellent performance by Edward G. Robinson highlights this story of a man who relives some key incidents of his life during the two seconds it takes to execute him for murder. I'm not familiar with Vivienne Osborne, the film's lead, but she did a good job in conveying a trashy dance hall dame who tricks Eddie (named John Allen here) into marrying her, then turns on him when he becomes ill after witnessing the falling death of his best friend. Overly dramatic at times, but still a film I'm glad I discovered (with the help of TCM...thanks!)
rubystevens
Super Reviewer
½ January 21, 2010
hmm has anyone else seen this film? it's a pretty good melodrama with edward g having a courtroom flashback at his sentencing for murder. catch it if u can. i've sent in the poster...
March 2, 2009
In Two Seconds, we see the man's demise in lengthy flashback, supposedly all recalled in the two seconds it takes him to die in the electric chair. He had started out as an okay guy, a riveter who worked on a skyscraper's steel skeleton, rooming with his co-worker and best friend, just looking for the right girl. After another botched double date, he wandered into a taxi dance hall (oh, how I wish these still existed!), where he met a conniving vixen who played to all desires. Against his roomie's warnings, the schmuck took her out again, and she got him so drunk that she was able to bribe a justice of the peace to marry them. Arguing about the situation up in the sky, the idiot raises his hand against his well-intentioned friend, sending the man plunging to his death. This sends our man into a permanent nervous state; he can't work, so his new wife goes back to the dance hall, against his insistence. She buys herself dresses and pays their rent, along with grocery and doctor bills, with this "dirty" money, while her husband sits at home with the shakes. When he comes into an unexpected windfall, he really looses his mind. He goes to the dance hall and finds her there, in the arms of another man. Paying back his debt in cash, he pulls out a gun and shoots the woman dead. We see him briefly in front of the judge, pleading for clemency in his famous whine, insisting that he deserved to die while he lived off the dirty money, but that he should be free, now that he's paid his debts. Of course, the judge can't abide by this logic, and we return to the chair, where the crank is pulled: the necessary two seconds have passed, and he's dead now. What a delightful ending!
Super Reviewer
July 6, 2008
nominated for best picture by NBR
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